NHS guide: long version

Introduction to the guide

About this guide

This guide contains instructions and examples to help you answer each National Household Survey (NHS) question as accurately as possible. Also included are reasons why questions are asked and how the information you provide is used.

What is the National Household Survey (NHS)?

The National Household Survey (NHS) is a new, voluntary survey which replaces the long-form census questionnaire. The NHS bears great similarity to the long-form questionnaire, but also asks questions that were not found on the 2006 long-form. The NHS contains a total of 65 questions.

The 2011 NHS will be held in June 2011.

Why is the NHS important?

The results of the NHS will be used to make many important decisions affecting your neighbourhood, your province or territory, and the entire country. Governments, businesses, associations, and community organizations are among the many thousands of NHS data users. For example, the information collected in the NHS will provide data to plan and support family services, housing, roads and public transportation, and skills training for employment.

If you need help

Visit the NHS website at www.nhs.statcan.gc.ca or call the StatCan Help Line at 1-877-308-2777 (TTY: 1-866-753-7083) starting May 2, 2011 if:

  • you have a question about filling in your NHS form or you want some information about the NHS
  • you are having trouble filling in your NHS form
  • you need a new NHS form because the original is lost or damaged
  • you need a questionnaire in the other official language
  • you need an extra questionnaire because there are more people in your household than there is space for on the questionnaire
  • you need a new Secure Access Code to answer your questionnaire online
  • you want to speak to someone in a language other than English or French or you want a copy of the questions in a language other than English or French.

Operators will be able to provide assistance in various languages in addition to English and French. To assist respondents whose first language is neither English nor French, the NHS questions have been translated into 31 other languages, including 11 Aboriginal languages. Respondents may also contact the StatCan Help Line to obtain a copy of the census questions in any of these 31 languages or to obtain the NHS questions in large print, Braille or in audio format.

For access to TDD/TTY (Telecommunication Devices for the Deaf/Teletype Machines only), call 1-866-753-7083 (free of charge).

The law protects what you tell us

By law, Statistics Canada must protect the confidentiality of the personal information you provide on your NHS form. All Statistics Canada employees are personally liable to fines or imprisonment should they contravene the confidentiality provisions of the Statistics Act. NHS results are released only in a form that does not identify individuals (e.g., aggregate data tables, graphs, analyses, etc.). No information that could identify you, or a member of your household, is ever released. The one exception is if you agree to Question F1, your personal NHS information may be provided to Library and Archives Canada after 92 years (please see the discussion of Step F, below, for further information).

To complete your NHS questionnaire online

Visit the NHS website at www.nhs.statcan.gc.ca.

Before you start, you will need the Secure Access Code located on the front page of the printed questionnaire.

When you click the ’start’ button on the NHS website, your browser will automatically be tested to see if it meets the necessary security requirements to begin the questionnaire. You will receive a message if you need to update or modify your settings.

Your role in the NHS

The information you provide will help ensure that the 2011 NHS accurately reflects your community. If you receive the NHS, support your community and complete the survey.  

Starting off – step by step

Step A

We need your telephone number to contact you should you forget to provide information on your questionnaire.

We need your address to ensure that all dwellings in the sample are counted. Complete your address only if no printed address is provided on the cover page of the questionnaire or if the address where you lived on May 10, 2011 was different than the one printed on the front cover page.

In the case where the printed address is not the exact one (there is a typing error in the name of the street or an error in the street type), you don’t have to correct your address in the response field or in the printed address field. 

Steps B and C

These steps help you to decide who should be included and who should not be included on your questionnaire. They help us to ensure that we have counted everyone we need to count and that no one is counted twice. Please refer to instructions 1 and 2 provided on the second page of your questionnaire. 

Step D

Using capital letters, please copy the names that you already listed in Step B to answer Question 1 at the top of page 4 in the boxes provided. Please place names in the same order. It is important that information provided for the members of your household correspond to the names of all the persons you have identified. The questionnaire is designed for a household of five persons or less. If there are more than five persons in your household, you will need a second questionnaire which can be obtained by calling 1-877-308-2777.

The questions

Basic population information

Question 1 (on the paper survey) asks for the name of each person in the household so that the questions can be asked person by person.

Questions 2 to 6 provide information about the living arrangements of people in Canada, family size, the number of children living with one parent or two parents, and the number of people who live alone. This information is used for planning social programs. It is also used by communities to plan services such as daycare centres, schools and senior citizens’ residences.

Your NHS questionnaire contains all the information needed to answer questions 1 to 6.  If you still have questions or require further information, please visit the NHS website at www.nhs.statcan.gc.ca or phone the StatCan Help Line at 1-877-308-2777.

Question 1 – Name

No additional information.

Question 2 – Sex

Mark either ‘male’ or ‘female’ to indicate the sex of each person.

Question 3 – Date of birth

Enter the date of birth and age of each person in the boxes provided.

Question 4 – Marital status

Mark the circle that indicates the person’s current legal marital status. This does not include the person’s common-law status, which is asked in a separate question.

If the person is the adult son or daughter of Person 1 and still lives at home, mark the circle that most closely describes that person’s marital status. Provide one response only for each person.

It is important to indicate the marital status of every person in the household–even babies and young children. Children under age 15 should be marked as ‘never legally married’.

Question 5 – Common-law status

Mark ‘Yes’ or ‘No’ to indicate whether this person is living with a common-law partner.

Question 6 – Relationship to Person 1

For each person usually living here, describe their relationship to Person 1. Provide one response only for each person.

If none of the choices apply, specify this person's relationship to Person 1 under ‘Other’.

Examples of ‘Other’ relationships to Person 1:

  • brother-in-law or sister-in-law
  • niece or nephew
  • grandfather or grandmother
  • room-mate's son or daughter
  • lodger's husband or wife
  • employee
  • etc.

For all children, please consider the relationship to Person 1 and Person 2.

Adopted children should be considered sons and daughters.

Children in joint custody should be included in the home of the parent where they live most of the time.

Children who spend equal time with each parent should be included in the home of the parent with whom they are staying on May 10, 2011.

Activities of daily living

Questions 7 and 8 provide information on the number of people in Canada who have difficulties with daily activities, and whose activities are reduced because of a physical or mental condition or a health problem. This information is used to plan services relating to accessibility, support and health care.

These questions refer to conditions or health problems that have lasted or are expected to last six months or more.

For young children, consider only those conditions or problems that have been diagnosed by a professional.

Question 7 – Difficulties with daily living

For persons who have difficulty hearing, seeing, communicating, walking, climbing stairs, bending, learning, or any similar activity,

  • mark either ‘Yes, sometimes’ or ‘Yes, often’ as appropriate.

For persons who do not have difficulty with these activities,

  • mark ‘No’.

Question 8 – Reduction in activities due to physical or mental conditions or health problems

Part (a)

For persons with a physical or mental condition or health problem that reduces the amount or the kind of activity they can do at home,

  • mark either ‘Yes, sometimes’ or ‘Yes, often’ as appropriate.

For persons who do not have such a condition,

  • mark ‘No’.

Part (b)

For persons with a physical or mental condition or health problem that reduces the amount or the kind of activity they can do at work or at school,   

  • mark either ‘Yes, sometimes’ or ‘Yes, often’ as appropriate.

For persons who do not have such a condition,

  • mark ‘No’.

For persons who do not attend school or work,

  • mark ‘Not applicable’.

Part (c)

For persons with a physical or mental condition or health problem that reduces the amount or the kind of activity they can do in other activities, for example transportation or leisure,

  • mark either ‘Yes, sometimes’ or ‘Yes, often’ as appropriate.

For persons who do not have such a condition,

  • mark ‘No’.

Sociocultural information

Questions 9 to 22 provide a social and cultural profile of Canada’s population.

Question 9 provides information on the diversity of Canada’s population, and tells us about movements of people within Canada and from other countries to Canada.

Question 10 provides the citizenship status of Canada’s population. The information is used to plan citizenship classes and programs.

Questions 11 and 12 provide information about immigrants and non-permanent residents in Canada, and the year people immigrated. This information is used to compare the situation of immigrants over time, to evaluate immigration and employment policies and programs, and to plan education, health and other services.

Questions 13 to 16 are used to provide a profile of the linguistic diversity of Canada’s population. This information is used to estimate the need for services in English and French, and to better understand the current status and the evolution of Canada’s various language groups.

Question 17 provides information about ethnic and cultural diversity in Canada. This information is used by associations, agencies and researchers for activities such as health promotion, communications and marketing.

Questions 18, 20 and 21 provide information used by governments, including Aboriginal governments and organisations, to develop programs and services for Aboriginal people.

Question 19 tells us about the visible minority population in Canada. This information is required for programs under the Employment Equity Act, which promote equal opportunity for everyone.

Question 22 helps measure religious affiliation and diversity. It is used to trace change in Canada’s society. The information is also used to plan facilities and services within diverse communities .

Question 9 – Place of birth

For persons born in any of the six counties of Northern Ireland,

  • report ‘United Kingdom’.

For persons born in one of the counties of the Republic of Ireland,

  • report ‘Republic of Ireland’.

For persons born in the former U.S.S.R., the former Yugoslavia, or the former Czechoslovakia,

  • report the name of the independent country or republic according to the boundaries in existence on May 10, 2011. For example, a person who was born in the former U.S.S.R. should report the specific country or republic that is now a nation state–Ukraine, Latvia, Russia, etc.

For persons who are not sure of the country because its boundaries have changed since the time of birth,

  • report the name of the nearest city, state or province.

For adopted persons,

  •  report the place of birth of their adoptive parents if place of birth is unknown for the adopted person or for the adopted person’s birth parents.

Question 10 – Citizenship

For persons born in Canada, unless–at the time of their birth–one or both parents were government representatives of another country (for example, in diplomatic service) and neither parent was a Canadian citizen or a landed immigrant,

  • mark ‘Canada, by birth’.

For persons born outside Canada if, at the time of their birth, one or both parents were Canadian citizens,

  • mark ‘Canada, by birth’.

For persons who have applied for, and have been granted, Canadian citizenship (i.e., persons who have been issued a Canadian citizenship certificate),

  • mark ‘Canada, by naturalization’.

For persons who were born outside Canada and have not become Canadian citizens,

  • report under ‘Other country’ the name of the other country for which they hold citizenship.

For persons who are dual citizens of Canada and another country, do not report ‘dual citizenship’:

  • mark either ‘Canada, by birth’ or ‘Canada, by naturalization’, and report the name of the other country.

Question 11 – Landed immigrant status

For persons who are Canadian citizens by birth, foreign students, foreign workers, or refugee claimants,

  • mark ‘No’.

For persons who are Canadian citizens by naturalization or are permanent residents under the Immigration Act (permanent residents have been granted the right to live permanently in Canada by Canadian immigration authorities but have not yet obtained Canadian citizenship),

  • mark ‘Yes’.

Question 12 – Year of immigration

For persons who immigrated to Canada more than once, report the year landed immigrant status was first obtained.

Question 13 – Knowledge of English and French

  • Mark ‘English’ or ‘French’, or both, only if the person can carry on a conversation of some length on various topics in that language.
  • For people who are deaf or have a speech disability, report knowledge of English, French, or both.

Question 14 – Knowledge of languages other than English or French

  • Report only those languages in which the person can carry on a conversation of some length on various topics.
  • For people who are deaf or have a speech disability, report knowledge of other languages, including sign language.

Question 15 – Language(s) spoken at home

Part (a)

  • Report the language spoken most often at home. Report more than one language only if all languages are spoken equally often.
  • For a child who has not yet learned to speak, report the language spoken most often to the child at home.
  • For a person who lives alone, report the language in which they feel most comfortable.
  • For people who are deaf or have a speech disability, report knowledge of English, French, or other languages, including sign language.

Part (b)

  • Report any other language(s) that the person speaks at home on a regular basis, but not as often as the main language reported in part (a).
  • For people who are deaf or have a speech disability, report knowledge of English, French, or other languages, including sign language.

Question 16 – First language learned at home in childhood and still understood

  • For a person who learned two languages at the same time in early childhood, report the language this person spoke most often at home before starting school. Report two languages only if both languages were used equally often and are still understood by this person.
  • For people who are deaf or have a speech disability, report knowledge of English, French, or other languages, including sign language.

Question 17 – Ethnic or cultural origins

This question refers to the ethnic or cultural origin or origins of a person’s ancestors. Other than Aboriginal persons, most people can trace their origins to their ancestors who first came to this continent. Ancestry should not be confused with citizenship or nationality.

For all persons, report the specific ethnic or cultural group or groups to which their ancestors belonged, not the language they spoke. For example, report ‘Haitian’ rather than ‘French’, or ‘Austrian’ rather than ‘German’.

For persons of East Indian or South Asian origins, report a specific origin or origins. Do not report ‘Indian’. For example, report ‘East Indian from India’, ‘East Indian from Guyana’, or indicate the specific group, such as ‘Punjabi’ or ‘Tamil’.

For persons with Aboriginal ancestors, report a specific origin or origins. For example, report ‘Cree’, ‘Mi’kmaq’, ‘Ojibway’, ‘Métis’, or ‘North American Indian’. Do not report ‘Indian’.

Question 18 – Aboriginal group

  •  Answer this question regardless of whether or not this person is an Aboriginal person of North America.
  • Aboriginal people are usually those with ancestors who resided in North America prior to European contact and who identify with one of the three Aboriginal groups listed on the questionnaire–First Nations (North American Indian), Métis and Inuit.
  • Persons who consider themselves to be East Indian or Asian Indian, or who have ethnic roots on the subcontinent of India, should respond ‘No’ to this question.
  • Individuals who refer to themselves as Métis in the context of mixed ancestry, but who do not have North American Aboriginal ancestry–for example, those from Africa, the Caribbean and South America–should  respond ‘No’.

Question 19 – Population group

‘Population group’ should not be confused with ‘citizenship’ or ‘nationality.’

For persons who belong to more than one population group,

  • mark all categories that apply
  • do not report ‘bi-racial’ or ‘mixed’ in the ‘other–specify’ box provided.

Question 20 – Registered or Treaty Indian Status

Select the circle ‘Yes, Status Indian (Registered or Treaty)’ for persons who:

  • are Registered Indians under the Indian Act
  • are Treaty Indians, only if they are Registered Indians under the Indian Act
  • have become registered since June 1985, when Bill C-31 changed the Indian Act.

All other persons should mark ‘No’, including persons who may be entitled to register under provisions of the Indian Act, but for some reason have not.

Question 21 – Membership in a First Nation or Indian band

  •  A First Nation/Indian band is a group of people for whom lands have been set apart and/or money is held by the Crown.
  • A member of a First Nation/Indian band is an individual who is recognized as being a member of a First Nation/Indian band, as defined by either the band itself or the Indian Act.
  • Individuals should report their First Nation/Indian band affiliation rather than their tribal affiliation–for example, ‘Chemawawin First Nation Band’ instead of ‘Cree’.

Question 22 – Religion

In the answer box provided, respondents should write the name of the specific denomination or religion with which they identify, even if they are not currently a practicing member of that group.

A person who has no religious affiliation can either choose to mark the circle for ‘No religion’ or to print other responses, such as ‘Atheist’ (does not believe in the existence of God) or ‘Agnostic’ (believes nothing can be known about the existence of God) in the write-in box.

For infants or children, report the denomination or religion in which they will be raised.

For persons who are members of a specific group within a larger religion, report the particular name or term for the specific group.

Respondents should indicate what they feel best describes their religious affiliation.

Mobility

Questions 23 and 24 tell us where residents of Canada are moving to and where they are moving from. This information is used to look at the characteristics of people who move, and to help identify the needs for housing, education, transportation and social services.

Question 23 – Place of residence 1 year ago

Mark ‘Born after May 10, 2010’,

  • if the person was born after May 10, 2010.

Mark ‘Lived at the same address as now’,

  • if the address has not changed or has changed simply because the boundary or name of the municipality, Indian reserve or township has changed.

Mark ‘Lived at a different address in the same city, town, village, township, municipality or Indian reserve’,

  • for persons who lived at a different address in the same city, town, village, township, municipality or Indian reserve.

Mark ‘Lived in a different city, town, village, township, municipality or Indian reserve in Canada’,

  • for persons who lived in a different city, town, village, township, municipality or Indian reserve in Canada on May 10, 2010, and print the name of the city, town, village, township, municipality or Indian reserve, the name of the province or territory, and print the postal code in capital letters.
  • Respondents should give the name of the city or town rather than the metropolitan area of which it is a part.

Mark ‘Lived outside Canada’,

  • for persons who lived outside Canada on May 10, 2010 and print the name of the country according to its current boundaries in capital letters.

Question 24 – Place of residence 5 years ago

Mark ‘Born after May 10, 2006’,

  • if the person was born after May 10, 2006.

Mark ‘Lived at the same address as now’,

  • if the address has not changed or has changed due to a boundary change or a name change of the municipality, Indian reserve or township.

Mark ‘Lived at a different address in the same city, town, village, township, municipality or Indian reserve’,

  • for persons who lived at a different address in the same city, town, village, township, municipality or Indian reserve.

Mark ‘Lived in a different city, town, village, township, municipality or Indian reserve in Canada’,

  • for persons who lived in a different city, town, village, township, municipality or Indian reserve in Canada on May 10, 2006, and print the name of the city, town, village, township, municipality or Indian reserve, the name of the province or territory, and print the postal code in capital letters.
  • Respondents should give the name of the city or town rather than the metropolitan area of which it is a part.

Mark the circle ‘lived outside Canada’,

  • for persons who lived outside of Canada on May 10, 2006, and print the name of the country according to its current boundaries in capital letters.

Place of birth of parents

Question 25 is used to assess the social and economic conditions of second-generation Canadians, and helps us understand Canada’s immigration history.

Question 25 – Place of birth of parents

For persons born in any of the six counties of Northern Ireland,

  • report ‘United Kingdom’.

For persons born in one of the counties of the Republic of Ireland,

  • report ‘Republic of Ireland’.

For persons born in the former U.S.S.R., the former Yugoslavia, or the former Czechoslovakia,

  • report the name of the independent country or republic according to the boundaries in existence on May 10, 2011. For example, a person who was born in the former U.S.S.R. should report the specific country or republic that is now a nation state–Ukraine, Latvia, Russia, etc.

For persons who are not sure of the country because its boundaries have changed since the time of birth,

  • report the name of the nearest city, state or province.

For adopted persons,

  • report the place of birth of their adoptive parents if place of birth is unknown for the adopted person or for the adopted person’s birth parents.

Question 26 – Answer questions 27 to 55 for each person aged 15 years and over.

This means that only respondents born before May 10, 1996 should answer questions 27 to 55.

Education

Questions 27 to 33 tell us about the education, training and recent school attendance of residents of Canada. Governments use this information to develop training and other programs to meet the changing needs of our workforce and of specific groups such as immigrants, Aboriginal peoples and youth.

Question 27 – Secondary (high) school diploma or equivalent

For persons who graduated from high school,

  • mark the circle ‘Yes, secondary (high) school diploma.’

If the person has a General Educational Development (GED) certificate or Adult Basic Education (ABE) certificate,

  • mark the circle ‘Yes, secondary (high) school equivalency certificate.’

For persons who have enough credits for the equivalent of high school graduation in the province or territory in which they live, even if they obtained their education outside of Canada,

  • mark the circle ‘Yes, secondary (high) school equivalency certificate.’

In Quebec, those who have a DEP/DVS (diplôme d’études professionnelles/diploma of vocational studies) should report this diploma in question 28, even if they received this diploma from a secondary school.

Persons who received certificates or diplomas outside Canada should report them in the category equivalent to that of the system of the province or territory in which they now live.

Question 28 – Registered apprenticeship or trades certificate or diploma

Include trades certificates and diplomas in question 28, even if they were obtained from a college, CEGEP, or other non-university institution. These trades certificates or diplomas should not be reported again in question 29.

For persons:

  • who received a certificate from a certified registered apprenticeship program, mark the circle ‘Yes, registered apprenticeship certificate (including a Certificate of Qualification, Journeyperson’s designation)’
  • who received a Certificate of Qualification (for example, Journeyperson’s designation, Red Seal endorsement), regardless of whether or not they completed a registered apprenticeship program, mark the circle ‘Yes, registered apprenticeship certificate (including a Certificate of Qualification, Journeyperson’s designation)’
  • who received a certificate or diploma through in-school training in trade-level vocational or pre-vocational programs given at community colleges, institutes of technology, and similar institutions, mark the circle ‘Yes, other trades certificate or diploma.’

Persons who have a trade certificate or diploma may or may not also have apprenticeship or Journeyperson training.

In Quebec, persons who have a DEP/DVS (diplôme d’études professionnelles/diploma of vocational studies) should report the diploma in question 28, even if they received this diploma from a secondary school.

Do not include training certificates from an employer, unless they are apprenticeship or trades certificates recognized by the federal, provincial or territorial government.

Persons who received certificates or diplomas outside Canada should report them in the category equivalent to that of the system of the province or territory in which they now live.

Question 29 – College, CEGEP, and non-university certificate or diploma

Do not include trades certificates or diplomas, even if they were obtained from a college, CEGEP, or other non-university institution. Report this type of training in question 28.

Report certificates or diplomas from a community college (both university transfer and semi-professional career programs), CEGEP (both general and technical), institute of technology, or any other school other than a university.

Mark the regular program length for any college, CEGEP, or other non-university certificates or diplomas completed, and not the time it actually took to complete.

In Quebec, diplomas for the general CEGEP program should be reported under the category ‘Yes, certificate or diploma from a program of 1 to 2 years.’

In Quebec, diplomas for the technical CEGEP program should be reported under the category ‘Yes, certificate or diploma from a program of more than 2 years.’

For persons who received their certificate or diploma from correspondence courses, online courses, or through part-time classes, mark the regular length of the program, and not the time it actually took to complete.

Include all college or other post-secondary certificates from institutions other than universities, whether or not a high school diploma was required for entrance. These include non-university teachers’ colleges and police colleges.

Teacher qualifications received from a university faculty of education or an institution that was associated with an accredited university should be reported in question 30, as a university certificate, diploma or degree.

For persons who received

  • a university certificate, diploma or degree from a university college, or
  • a bachelor’s degree or an applied degree from a degree-granting college,
  • mark the appropriate university category in question 30.

Do not include training certificates from an employer.

Persons who received certificates, diplomas or degrees outside Canada should report them in the category equivalent to that of the system of the province or territory in which they now live.

Report completed qualifications obtained only from educational institutions accredited by a province, territory or their international equivalents.

Question 30 – University certificate, diploma or degree

Persons should mark all university certificates, diplomas or degrees that they completed.

Include university certificates, diplomas or degrees granted by university colleges and bachelor’s degrees or applied degrees from degree-granting colleges.

For persons who have a non-degree teaching certificate awarded by a provincial or territorial department of education for a program at an approved institution associated with a university, and where a bachelor’s degree was not required to enrol in the program,

  • mark the circle ‘Yes, university certificate or diploma below bachelor level.’

For persons who earned their teaching qualifications at an accredited university’s faculty of education,

  • mark the circle ‘Yes, bachelor’s degree.’

‘University certificates or diplomas,’ either below the bachelor level or above the bachelor level, are awarded for non-degree programs of study completed through a university. They are often connected with professional associations in fields such as accounting, banking, insurance or public administration.

  • mark the circle ‘Yes, university certificate or diploma below bachelor level,’ if a bachelor degree is not required to enrol in the program; or
  • mark the circle ‘Yes, university certificate or diploma above bachelor level,’ if a bachelor degree is required to enrol in the program.

Persons who received their certificates, diplomas or degrees outside Canada should report them in the category equivalent to that of the system of the province or territory in which they now live.

Report completed qualifications obtained only from educational institutions accredited by a province, territory or their international equivalents.

Question 31 – Major field of study

Report the field of study corresponding to the person’s highest certificate, diploma, or degree received, though it may not correspond to their current occupation.

‘Highest certificate, diploma, or degree completed’ is generally related to the amount of time spent ‘in-class.’ For persons with a post-secondary certificate, diploma, or degree, a university education is considered to be a higher level of schooling than a college education, while a college education is considered to be a higher level of education than in the trades. Although some trades requirements may take as long or longer to complete than a given college or university program, the majority of time is spent in on-the-job paid training and less time is spent in the classroom.

For persons who earned more than one diploma, degree or certificate at the same highest level (for example, two college certificates of equal length or two bachelor’s degrees),

  • report the field of study for the certificate most recently obtained.

For persons who specialized in more than one field of study while earning their certificate, diploma or degree,

  • report the field in which the greatest number of credits or courses was obtained.

Wherever possible, report the sub-category of specialization within a broad area of training–especially for graduate studies or other advanced training.

Question 32 - Province, territory or country where the diploma was obtained

Report the location (province, territory or country) of the institution from which the person obtained their highest certificate, diploma or degree according to the current boundaries.

For persons who reported a location of study outside Canada who are not sure of their country of study because its boundaries have changed since the time of their studies,

  • report the name of the nearest city, state or province.

For persons who completed their highest certificate, diploma or degree through correspondence, online or distance learning,

  • report the location (province, territory or country) of the institution from which the certificate, diploma or degree was received.

Where two or more institutions jointly offer a program of study and are physically located in separate regions,

  • report the location (province, territory or country) of the lead institution.

Question 33 - School attendance

Mark ‘Yes’ for the appropriate category for all persons who attended a school or an educational institution at any time between the beginning of September 2010 and May 10, 2011, full-time or part-time, even if they were registered but subsequently dropped out.

Only include school attendance where the courses can be used as credits towards a certificate, diploma or degree from a recognized educational institution.

Educational institutions also include seminaries, schools of nursing, private business schools, private or public trade schools, vocational schools, or schools for people who are deaf or blind.

Include courses offered through correspondence, e-learning or distance education. Also include attendance at the in-class portion of an apprenticeship program.

Do not include training received from an employer unless it corresponds to courses offered by a recognized educational institution.

If the person took courses at more than one institution, mark all categories that apply.

Labour market activities

Questions 34 to 45 and 49 to 51 provide information on Canada’s workforce including the industries and occupations in which they work, as well as the language used at work. Employment information is used to assess the economic conditions of communities and specific populations such as Aboriginal Peoples and immigrants. Industry and occupation information is used to forecast job opportunities.

Retired Persons

All persons who did not work any hours during the week of May 1 to May 7, 2011 (answered ‘None’ to question 34), should answer questions 34 to 39 even if the reason they did not work was because they retired.

All persons who did any work for pay or in self-employment between January 1, 2010 and May 7th, 2011 should answer questions 40 to 51 even if they are retired at the time of the survey.

Recent Immigrants

Persons who did not have a job during the week of May 1 to May 7, 2011, but who have worked since January 1, 2010, should answer questions 34 to 39 for the last job they held even if it was in another country and continue with questions 40 to 51.

General

If the person held more than one job, they should answer questions 40 to 49 for the job at which they worked the most hours.

Question 34 –  Hours worked for pay or in self-employment

For each person 15 years and over, enter the total number of hours worked for pay at all jobs and in self-employment during the week of May 1 to May 7, 2011.

Include:

  • hours spent working for salary, wages, tips or commission
  • hours spent working in one’s own business, agricultural operation or professional practice, alone or with a partner.

Include as hours worked:

  • all time spent maintaining and administering the operation of one’s own agricultural operation, business or professional practice
  • all time spent fishing, trapping or hunting for profit or to maintain the community, with equipment that is rented, owned or owned in part
  • for fishers, hours spent preparing and maintaining boats, nets, etc.
  • for farmers, hours spent maintaining farm fences, buildings or machinery, cultivating, sowing, milking, etc.
  • hours spent working directly towards the operation of a family agricultural operation, business or professional practice without pay. This means working for a spouse or another relative who is a member of the same household. Include any work that helped the relative run his or her agricultural operation or business. For example, include bookkeeping for a business owned by a spouse.

If the number of hours is not known, report the best estimate.

Question 35 – Lay-off or absence from job

Answer only for persons aged 15 and over who did not work for pay during the week of May 1 to May 7, 2011.

mark ‘Yes, on temporary lay-off’ for persons who expect to return to the job from which they were laid off, no matter how long ago they were laid off.

mark ‘Yes, on vacation, ill, on strike or locked out, or absent for other reasons’ for persons who had a job or business during the week of May 1 to May 7, 2011 and were absent with or without pay for the whole week.

Include absence because of parental leave (maternity or paternity), bad weather, fire, personal or family responsibilities, etc.

Question 36 – New job arrangements

Answer only for persons aged 15 and over who did not work for pay during the week of May 1 to May 7, 2011.

Question 37 – Recent search for paid work

Answer only for persons aged 15 and over who did not work for pay during the week of May 1 to May 7, 2011.

Question 38 – Availability for work

Answer only for persons 15 and over who did not work for pay during the week of May 1 to May 7, 2011 and who actively looked for work in the previous four weeks.

Question 39 – Last date of work

Include only:

  • work done for wages, salary, tips, commission, piece-rate payment, payment in kind (payment in goods and services rather than in money)
  • work done in self-employment
  • work done without pay by family members for family businesses, agricultural operations or professional practice.

Do not include:

  • volunteer work
  • unpaid housework
  • unpaid child care
  • unpaid care to seniors
  • unpaid home maintenance
  • leisure activities.

Question 40 – Name of employer

For self-employed persons, enter the name of the business. If the business does not have a name, enter the person’s name.

For persons aged 15 and over who work as employees in someone’s home (for example, nannies), report the name of the family worked for, then report ‘private household’.

For persons aged 15 and over whose wages are paid by an agency that hires out their services, report the name of the agency.

Question 41 – Kind of business, industry or service

Describe the type of business, industry or service in detail.

For example, ‘automotive brake linings manufacturing’ would be a more complete response than ‘auto parts’; and ‘road and highway construction’ would be a more complete response than ‘construction’.

Question 42 – Occupation or work

Give specific descriptions of the occupation or work done.

For example, ‘electrical equipment maintainer’ would be a more complete response than ‘maintenance’; and ‘auto mechanic helper’ would be a more complete response than ‘helper’.

Question 43 – Main activities at work

Report the main activities this person does in his or her job. Be sure to indicate supervisory or management responsibilities if they apply.

For persons who are members of a religious order engaged in teaching or nursing, report these specific activities rather than the religious activities.

Question 44 – Class of worker

Mark ‘working for wages, salary, tips or commission’ for persons aged 15 and over who worked:

  • for wages or salary
  • for tips
  • on commission as a salesperson
  • for payment in kind (room, board) in a non-family enterprise (for example, as a member of a religious order)
  • for piece-rates
  • as a member of the Armed Forces
  • as a paid housekeeper or nanny.

Mark ‘working without pay for his / her spouse or another relative in a family agricultural operation or business’ for persons aged 15 and over who worked without money wages at a task that contributed to the operation of an agricultural operation or business that belongs to a spouse or relative who is a member of   this household.

‘Self-employed’ refers to persons aged 15 and over who:

  • operated their own business, agricultural operation or professional practice (alone or in partnership) even if no goods or services were sold
  • operated their own business, agricultural operation or professional practice (alone or in partnership) whether it made a profit or suffered a loss
  • operated an agricultural operation, whether they owned or rented the land
  • worked on a freelance or contract basis
  • provided meals and / or room or day-care services in their own home for boarders, roomers or neighbours’ children
  • operated a direct distributorship selling and delivering products such as cosmetics, newspapers, brushes or cleaning products
  • fished, trapped or hunted for profit or for the maintenance of the community, with equipment that is rented, owned or owned in part
  • were setting up a business, agricultural operation or professional practice.

Mark ‘Self-employed without paid help’ if the person is self-employed and does not have any employees.

Mark ‘Self-employed with paid help’ if the person is self-employed and has one or more paid employees.

If the person held more than one job, they should answer question 44 for the job at which they worked the most hours.

Question 45 – Incorporation status 

Incorporated business is a business or agricultural operation that has been formed into a legal corporation under either federal or provincial/territorial laws.

Mark ‘Yes’ if the person is self-employed, and their business is incorporated.

Mark ‘No’ if the person is self-employed, and their business is not incorporated.

Question 49 – Language at work   

Part (a)

  • Report two languages only if they are used equally often.
  • Report languages used to speak, read or write in order to perform a job or a major task.
  • Do not report a language used only during coffee, lunch or other rest breaks.
  • For people who are deaf or who have a speech disability, report languages used to speak, read or write in order to perform a job or a major task, including sign language.

Part (b)

  • Report any other language(s) that this person may use on a regular basis in performing a job or a major task, though not as often as the main language reported in part (a).
  • Do not report a language used only during coffee, lunch or other rest breaks.
  • For people who are deaf or who have a speech disability, report languages used to speak, read or write in order to perform a job or a major task, including sign language.

Question 50 – Weeks worked in 2010

Include any week in which persons aged 15 and over worked for pay or in self-employment in 2010, even if they only worked for a few hours during the entire week.

Exclude weeks on leave without pay.

Include weeks:

  • on leave with pay
  • on training paid for by the employer
  • on paid vacation and sick leave with pay

Report ‘52 weeks’ for persons who worked less than a year but who were paid on a 12-month basis, for example, teachers.

Self-Employed Persons

Report ‘52 weeks’ for persons who operated a business, agricultural operation or professional practice for the full year, including weeks on vacation or sick leave (paid or unpaid).

Question 51 – Full-time or part-time work

Mark ‘Full time’ for persons aged 15 and over who worked 30 hours or more per week at all jobs (may be more than one), salaried or self-employed, during most of the weeks they had worked in 2010.

Mark ‘Part time’ for persons aged 15 and over who worked less than 30 hours per week at all jobs (may be more than one), salaried or self-employed, during most of the weeks they had worked in 2010.

Persons who had a part-time job during one part of the year and a full-time job during the other part of the year should answer on the basis of the job for which they worked the most number of weeks.

Place of work and transportation

Questions 46 to 48 tell us where people work and how they get to work. This information is used to assess commuting patterns, public transit needs and energy use.

Labour market information also helps to identify locations for new hospitals, schools, daycare and recreational facilities, and the need for roads and transit services.

These questions should be completed for the job recorded in questions 40 to 45.

For persons who had more than one job during the week of May 1 to May 7, 2011, questions should be answered for the job at which they worked the most hours.

Report this person’s regular place of work, even if they were temporarily on assignment, training or holiday during the week of May 1 to May 7, 2011.

If the person did not have a job during the week of May 1 to May 7, 2011, the questions should be answered for the job of the longest duration in the past year and a half, that is, since January 1, 2010.

Question 46 – Place of work

For persons aged 15 and over who worked most of the time at home–for example, farmers, apartment building superintendents, teleworkers, etc.,

  • mark ‘Worked at home’.

For persons who worked part of the time at home and part of the time at an employer’s address, but most of the time was spent working at home (for example, three days out of five, or 10 hours out of 15),

  • mark ‘Worked at home’.

For persons who worked at various work locations or job sites and did not report to a headquarters or depot before starting work each day,

  • mark ‘No fixed workplace address’.

For persons who usually worked at a specific location other than their homes,

  • mark ‘Worked at the address specified below’.

For persons who worked part of the time at home and part of the time at an employer’s address, but spent most of their working time at an employer’s address,

  • mark ‘Worked at the address specified below’.

For persons who reported to a headquarters or depot each day, before going to various work locations or job sites,

  • mark ‘Worked at the address specified below’.

When ‘worked at the address specified below’ is marked, print the address in capital letters.

Provide a complete address including street number, name, type and, if applicable, direction. Give the name of the city or town rather than the metropolitan area of which it is a part.

If the employer’s address is unknown, or if the employer’s mailing address is a post office box, print the name of the building or the nearest street intersection to the employer’s physical address. Do not give a post office box number.

Question 47 – Mode of transportation to work

Part (a)

Mark the type of transportation usually used to get to work.

Mark only one circle indicating the type of transportation used for most of the distance traveled.

If different modes of transportation were used to go to work and come home,

  • mark the mode of transportation used to get to work.

If different modes of transportation were used at different times of the year, for example, the person took public transit to work during the winter and walked, bicycled, or used a motorcycle in the summer,

  • mark the mode of transportation used in the week of May 1 to May 7, 2011.

If more than one mode of transportation was used, for example, they drove and then took public transit,

  • the person should report the one used for most of the travel distance.

If the person did not regularly commute from home to work, for example their home was far away from their work and they lived near their work during the work week and traveled home on weekends,

  • the person should answer according to where they lived when at work.

Part (b)

For those who marked ‘Car, truck or van–as a driver’ or ‘Car, truck or van–as a passenger’ in question 47(a),

  • mark the appropriate circle to indicate how many people usually shared the ride to work.

For people who were driven to work by someone who was not going to work,

  • the question refers to the number of people who shared the ride to work. If no other people in the car, truck or van were traveling to work, the person should mark ‘drove alone.’

Question 48 – Time of travel to work

Part (a)

Report the time the person usually left their home in order to go to work according to the twelve hour clock–then mark either ‘a.m.’ or ‘p.m.’ as appropriate.

If the person left for work at noon, report ‘12:00’ and mark ‘p.m.’ If the person left for work at midnight, report ‘12:00’ and mark ‘a.m.’

If the person’s work schedule varied or they worked different shifts,

  • report the time they left most often during the week of May 1 to May 7, 2011.

If there is no ‘most often’ time, then select a specific day that they worked and report the time that they left on that day.

If the person did not travel directly from home to work, for example, a student who went from school to their work,

  • report the time they left school to go to work, rather than the time that they left home.

Part (b)

Report the number of minutes it usually took the person to get from home to work. The travel time is from door to door. Include the time waiting for public transit or picking up passengers. Do not include the time taken to get from work to home.

If the trip to work normally includes a stop such as dropping off children at daycare,

  • include the time traveling to this stop but do not include the time at this stop.

Income

Questions 52 and 53 provide information on expenses related to child care and support payments. Along with the information on income, these questions provide more precise measures of disposable income.

Questions 54 and 55 provide statistics on income from all sources. Governments use these statistics to develop income support programs such as Old Age Security, provincial income supplements and social assistance payments. Businesses use income statistics to locate stores, and to develop new products and services. Private and public sector researchers use information about earnings to study labour markets and industry patterns.

If you need to report an amount that exceeds the space available in the response boxes, enter all the additional digits in the leftmost box.

Question 52 – Amount paid for child care

For persons who paid for child care in order to work at a paid job,

  • mark ‘Yes’ and enter the amount paid.

Only enter the full amount once, even if child care enabled more than one person to work at a paid job. You may split the amount between the payers if you choose.

Do not include casual babysitting arrangements made for entertainment purposes.

For persons who did not pay for child care in order to work at a paid job,

  • mark ‘No’.

Question 53 – Support payments

For persons who paid child or spousal support to a former spouse or partner,

  • mark ‘Yes’ and enter the amount.

Only include support payments that were actually paid.

Do not include transfers of money or other gifts.

Report the total amount paid, not only the taxable portion.

If you received child or spousal support, please report it as income in question 55, part (l).

For persons who did not pay child or spousal support,

  • mark ‘No’.

Question 54 – Tax permission option

Respondents completing the survey questionnaire can save time by permitting Statistics Canada to use information that is available in their income tax file.

If you wish to give Statistics Canada authorization to use your income tax information and skip question 55,

  • mark ‘Yes’.

If you do not wish to give permission to Statistics Canada to use your income tax information for this survey, or you do not plan to file an income tax return for 2010,

  • mark ‘No’ and continue with question 55.

Question 55 – Income in 2010

General Instructions

Complete question 55 for all persons aged 15 and over who said no to question 54, whether or not they worked in 2010.

Report annual income received from January 1, 2010 to December 31, 2010 for each applicable source in parts (a) to (l), as well as the total income from all sources.

Also report total income tax paid in 2010 (federal, provincial and territorial). If you are not sure of the exact amount for a source, consult your 2010 income tax return and information slips or give your best estimate.

For persons who had no income from any source in 2010,

  • mark ‘No’ in parts (a) to (l) and against total income, and report $0 in income tax paid.

In the case of a loss in parts (b), (c), (i) or (j),

  • mark ‘Yes’, report the amount and also mark ‘Loss’.

In the case of a loss in total income,

  • mark ‘Yes’, report the amount and also mark ‘Loss’.

Report income obtained from outside Canada in equivalent Canadian dollars.

Paid employment

Part (a) – Total wages and salaries

Report in part (a) the total amount of wages and salaries received in 2010.

Include:

  • total wages and salaries from all jobs before deductions for income tax, pensions etc. Do not report take-home pay only.
  • commissions, tips, cash bonuses and casual earnings.
  • military pay and allowances.
  • benefits from wage-loss replacement plans or income-maintenance insurance plans.
  • employer or union supplementary unemployment benefits.
  • other employment income, such as taxable benefits, research grants and royalties.

Report retirement allowances and severance pay in part (l), ‘Other money income’.

If using T4 slips to answer part (a), report the amount in Box 14.

If using your T1 income tax form, report the total of lines 101 and 104.

Self-employment income

Part (b) – Net farm income

Persons who operated an agricultural operation in 2010, alone or in partnership, should report net farm income (gross receipts minus operating expenses, such as wages, rent or capital cost allowance) in part (b).

In the case of a partnership,

  • report only this person’s share of net income.

In the case of a loss,

  • mark ‘Yes’, report the amount and also mark ‘Loss’.

Agricultural operations produce at least one of the following items intended for sale:

  • hay, field crops, tree fruits or nuts, berries, grapes, vegetables or seed
  • poultry, livestock, game birds or animals
  • animal products such as eggs, milk, meat, furs or wool
  • greenhouse or nursery products
  • other agricultural products such as honey, bees, mushrooms, sod, Christmas trees or maple syrup products.

Include:

  • cash advances in gross receipts received in 2010
  • all rebates and farm-support payments from federal, provincial, territorial and regional agricultural programs, such as dairy or milk subsidies
  • marketing board payments and dividends received from co-operatives
  • gross insurance and program proceeds, such as payments from crop insurance or the Canadian Agricultural Income Stabilization program.

Do not include:

  • the value of agricultural products produced and consumed on the farm or traded for goods. 

Report income from incorporated farms in part (a), ‘Total wages and salaries’, and/or in part (i), ‘Dividends, interest on bonds, deposits and savings certificates, and other investment income’.

For persons who rented out their farms,

  • report the net rent in part (i), ‘Dividends, interest on bonds, deposits and savings certificates, and other investment income’.

If using your T1 income tax form, report the amount on line 141.

Part (c) – Net non-farm income from unincorporated business, professional practice, etc.

Mark ‘Yes’ in part (c) for:

  • persons who owned and operated a non-farm, unincorporated business or professional practice in 2010, alone or in partnership, including:
  • persons doing casual work, such as baby-sitting in their own home, or selling and delivering cosmetics or newspapers
  • freelancers, such as artists, writers or music teachers
  • persons who received income from provision of room and board to non-relatives
  • self-employed fishers, trappers and hunters.

Report net income (gross receipts minus operating expenses such as wages, rents or depreciation). Do not subtract personal deductions such as income tax and pension contributions.

In the case of a partnership,

  • report only this person’s share of net income.

In the case of a loss,

  • mark ‘Yes’, report the amount and also mark ‘Loss’.

Include also:

  • net income from roomers and boarders.

Report income from incorporated businesses in part (a), ‘Total wages and salaries’, and / or in part (i), ‘Dividends, interest on bonds, deposits and savings certificates, and other investment income’.

If using your T1 income tax form, report the total of lines 135, 137, 139 and 143.

Income from government

Part (d) – Child benefits

Mark ‘Yes’ in part (d) for eligible parents who received child benefits in 2010 for dependant children from the federal, provincial or territorial governments.

Include:

  • Canada Child Tax Benefit (CCTB), Universal Child Care Benefit (UCCB), and any provincial or territorial child tax benefits such as Nova Scotia Child Benefit, New Brunswick Child Tax Benefit and Working Income Supplement, Quebec Child Assistance and Supplement for Handicapped Children, Ontario Child Care Supplement for Working Families, Saskatchewan Child Benefit, Alberta Employment Tax Credit, British Columbia Family Bonus or Earned Income Benefit, Yukon Child Benefit, Nunavut Child Benefit, Northwest Territories Child Benefit and Territorial Workers’ Supplement
  • Child disability benefit

Report alimony, child support and any periodic support received from persons not in the household in question 55, part (l), ‘Other money income’.

Do not include:

  • orphans’ benefits
  • payments for care of foster children.

If using your T1 income tax form, only the Universal Child Care Benefit part is listed on the tax form. Report line 117, minus line 213, plus the amount from any other programs.

Part (e) – Old Age Security Pension, Guaranteed Income Supplement, Allowance and Allowance for the Survivor

Mark ‘Yes’ in part (e) for:

  • persons 65 years and over who received Old Age Security Pension (and Guaranteed Income Supplement) from the federal government in 2010
  • 60 to 64-year-old spouses or common-law partners of pensioners who received the Allowance
  • 60 to 64-year-old widowed spouses or common-law partners who received the Allowance for the survivor.

Exclude the amount of Old Age Security benefit that you must repay as part of social benefit repayments.

Report provincial or territorial income supplements in part (h), ‘Other income from government sources’.

If using T4A (Old Age Security) slips to answer part (e), report the sum of the amounts in boxes 18 and 21.

If using your T1 income tax form, report the total of lines 113 and 146, minus the relevant part of line 235.

Part (f) – Benefits from Canada or Quebec Pension Plan

Report in part (f) benefits received from the Canada or Quebec Pension Plan in 2010.

Include:

  • retirement pensions
  • survivors’ benefits (including survivor’s pension and children’s benefits)
  • disability benefits
  • a combination of these pensions and benefits.

Do not include:

  • contributions to the plan
  • lump-sum death benefits.

Report retirement pensions of civil servants, RCMP and military personnel in part (k), ‘Retirement pensions, superannuation and annuities, including those from RRSPs and RRIFs’.

Report old age, retirement and war pensions received from foreign sources in part (l), ‘Other money income’.

If using T4A (P) slips to answer part (f), report the amount in box 20.

If using your T1 income tax form, report the amount on line 114.

Part (g) – Benefits from Employment Insurance

Report in part (g) benefits received under the federal Employment Insurance (EI) and the Quebec Parental Insurance Plan (QPIP) programs in 2010.

Include benefits received for:

  • unemployment, including self-employed fishers
  • maternity or parental care
  • sickness
  • compassionate care.

Report employer or union supplementary unemployment benefits in part (a), ‘Total wages and salaries’.

Exclude the amount of EI benefits that you must repay as part of social benefits repayments.

If using T4E slips to answer part (g), report the amount in box 14.

If using your T1 income tax form, report the amount on line 119, minus the relevant part of line 235.

Part (h) – Other income from government sources

Report in part (h) income received from federal, provincial, territorial and municipal government(s) in 2010 and not reported in other parts of question 55.

Include:

  • provincial or territorial income supplements to Old Age Security pension recipients
  • provincial or territorial payments for rent or lodging expenses for senior citizens
  • workers’ compensation benefits
  • veterans’ pensions
  • war veterans’ allowances
  • pensions to widows and orphans of veterans
  • refunds of Goods and Services Tax (GST) or Harmonized Sales Tax (HST)
  • refundable provincial or territorial tax credits
  • cash benefits for food, fuel and shelter under provincial, territorial or municipal social assistance (welfare) programs
  • cash assistance to persons who are handicapped or disabled
  • payments received from training programs sponsored by the federal, provincial or territorial governments.

Do not include:

  • income tax refunds
  • lump-sum compensation from a provincial/territorial government or agency for a criminal act or for motor vehicle accident victims.

Other income

Part (i) – Dividends, interest on bonds, deposits and savings certificates, and other investment income

Report in part (i) the total amount of dividends, interest earned from investments or other investment income received in 2010.

In the case of a joint investment, report only this person’s share.

In the case of a loss, mark ‘Yes’, report the amount and also mark ‘Loss’.

Include:

  • the actual (not the taxable) amount of dividends received from Canadian and foreign corporate stocks and mutual funds
  • interest from deposits in banks, trust companies, co-operatives, credit unions and caisses populaires
  • interest on savings certificates, guaranteed investment certificates (GICs), Canada Savings Bonds, other government or corporate bonds and debentures or treasury bills
  • cash dividends and interest from insurance policies
  • net rental income from real estate, including farmland
  • mortgage and loan interest received
  • regular income from an estate or trust fund
  • investment income received from abroad (report in Canadian dollars)
  • investment income received within a Tax Free Savings Account (TFSA), even if non-taxable.

Report capital gains or losses in part (j), ‘Capital gains or losses’.

If using your T1 income tax form, report the total of lines 120 (multiply amount by 0.8), 121, 122, and 126.

Part (j) – Capital gains or losses

For persons who made capital gains in 2010,

  • mark ‘Yes’ and report the amount.

In the case of a capital loss,

  • mark ‘Yes’, report the amount and also mark ‘Loss’.

If using your T1 income tax form, report the amount from line 197 on Schedule 3.

Part (k) – Retirement pensions, superannuation and annuities, including those from RRSPs and RRIFs

  • For persons who received pension income or survivors’ benefits in 2010 from an employee pension plan, or annuities from a matured registered retirement savings plan (RRSP) or a registered retirement income fund (RRIF),
  • Mark ‘Yes’ and enter the amount. 

Include:

  • all income from a pension plan of one or more employers
  • payments received from all annuities, including payments from a matured RRSP in the form of a life annuity, a fixed-term annuity, a RRIF or an income-averaging annuity contract
  • pensions paid to widow(er)s or other relatives of deceased pensioners
  • pensions of retired civil servants, Armed Forces personnel and RCMP officers
  • annuity payments received from the Canadian Government Annuities Fund or an insurance company.

Do not include:

  • lump-sum benefits
  • withdrawals from a pension plan or RRSP
  • refunds of overcontributions
  • scheduled repayments you failed to make to your RRSP under the Home Buyer’s plan (HBP) or the Lifelong Learning Plan (LLP).

Report severance pay, retirement allowances, and old age, retirement and war pensions received from foreign sources in part (l), ‘Other money income’.

If using your T1 income tax form, usually report the total of lines 115 and 129, subject to the exclusions noted above.

Part (l) – Other money income

Report in part (l) any other regular cash income received in 2010 and not covered in parts (a) to (k).

Include:

  • alimony, child support and any periodic support from persons not in the household
  • non-refundable scholarships, bursaries, fellowships and study grants, and artists’ project grants
  • severance pay and retirement allowances.

Do not include:

  • money received from gambling, lotteries, the sale of property or loan repayments
  • a cash refund of pension fund contributions
  • lump-sum death benefits or any other one-time, lump-sum payment
  • lump-sum inheritance or insurance policy settlements or cash gifts
  • income tax refunds.

If using your T1 income tax form, report the total of lines 156 and 130.

Total income

Total income is the sum of all sources provided in parts (a) to (l).

In the case of a loss, mark ‘Yes’, report the amount and also mark ‘Loss’.

Income tax paid

Report all income tax paid to federal, provincial and territorial governments for income received in 2010. This includes amounts paid at tax time, installments and amounts withheld by employers throughout 2010.

For those using income tax forms, the amount reported should be the sum of amounts in lines 420 and 428. Residents of Quebec should report the amount in line 420 minus the amount in line 440 from the federal return, plus the amount from line 430 of the Quebec income tax return.

Step E: housing

Questions E1 to E10 provide information to develop housing communities and projects.

Information on the number of rooms and bedrooms in homes and on housing costs is used to assess the economic situation of families. Governments use this information to measure levels of crowding within households and to develop housing programs.

Information on the age of dwellings and the need for repairs is used by municipalities to develop neighbourhood improvement programs.

Question E1 – Who pays the rent or mortgage, taxes, electricity, etc., for this dwelling?

  • Mark the circle(s) to indicate the person(s) who pays the rent, mortgage, taxes, electricity, etc., for this dwelling.

Question E2 – Owned or rented

  • Mark the circle ‘Owned’ if you and/or another member of this household own the dwelling in which you live, even if the dwelling is on rented or leased land, if it is part of a condominium or if it is being paid for by you or another member of your household. If the household contains both owners and renters, such as a boarder, the dwelling should be considered owned.
  • Mark the circle ‘Rented’ in all other cases, even if the dwelling you occupy is provided without cash rent or at a reduced rent (e.g., a clergy’s residence or a superintendent’s dwelling in an apartment building), or the dwelling is part of a co-operative.

Question E3 – Part of condominium development

  •  Mark ‘Yes’ if the dwelling is part of a condominium development.  Include as condominiums those dwellings that are in the process of becoming registered condominiums.
  • Mark ‘No’ if the dwelling is not part of a condominium development.

Question E4 – Number of rooms and bedrooms

Part (a) – Number of rooms in a dwelling

Do not count any half-rooms (e.g., instead of ‘1½’ enter ‘1’ or ‘2’, depending on which best describes the dwelling).

If a room is partially divided by a fixed or movable partition, or has two parts used for different purposes, such as an L-shaped living and dining room, count it as two separate rooms.

Part (b) – Number of bedrooms

For a one-room dwelling or bachelor apartment, report ‘0’.

Question E5 – Period when built

To find out the age of the building:

  • Ask the manager or superintendent in condominiums, large apartment blocks, or other rented dwellings.
  • Check your home insurance policy and documents about the purchase of the dwelling.

Question E6- – Need for repairs

  • Regular maintenance means the normal activities continually being performed to prevent the dwelling from deteriorating, such as oiling hinges and replacing electrical fuses.
  • If some part of your dwelling is damaged, defective or not operating properly, choose ‘Minor repairs’ or ‘Major repairs’. 
  • Choose ‘Major repairs’ if your dwelling needs critical repairs to electrical, heating or water systems; or structures such as wells, floors and ceilings; or needs major replacements such as a new roof, or new external siding.
  • If your dwelling needs both minor and major repairs, mark only ‘Major repairs’.

Question E7 – Dwelling on an agricultural operation

  • Mark the circle ‘Yes’ if the dwelling is on an agricultural operation that is operated by a member of the household.
  • In all other situations, mark the circle ‘No’.

Question E8 – Yearly payments

Parts (a) to (c)

  • If you have occupied this dwelling for less than a year, estimate and report the yearly amount based on either your payments up to this date or other available information.
  • For condominium owners, if electricity or other service charges are included in the condominium fee, mark ‘included in rent or other payments’.

Part (b)

  • To estimate the total yearly cost of fuel, find the amount of fuel you consumed during the year (litres of oil, containers of propane gas, cords of wood or tons of coal) and multiply it by the average price per unit.

Question E9 – Monthly rent

Part (a)

  • Enter the total rent paid by all household members for the dwelling you now occupy.
  • Include parking fees paid with rent, if any.

Part (b)

  • Mark ‘Yes’ if the dwelling is subsidized, otherwise, mark ‘No’.

Question E10 Owner costs

Part (a)

  • Where mortgage payments are made in increments other than monthly (e.g., biweekly), add all the payments made in the last 12 months and divide by 12 to calculate the average monthly payment.

Part (b)

  • If municipal property taxes are included in the regular monthly mortgage payments reported in part (a) and school taxes are not, mark ‘No’ in part (b) and report the annual school taxes in part (c).

Part (c)

  • Property taxes include local improvement taxes, even if they are billed separately.

Part (d)

  • For a single dwelling, report the value of the entire property, including the land and any other detached structure on the property (e.g., garage).
  • For a building that contains several dwellings or that includes both residential and business premises, estimate the portion of the market value that applies only to the dwelling in which you live.
  • To report an amount that exceeds available boxes, enter all additional digits in the leftmost box.

Part (e)

  • If condominium fees are not paid in monthly installments, add all payments made in the last 12 months and divide the total by 12 to calculate the average monthly payment.
  • If the dwelling is not part of a condominium development, mark the circle ‘none’.

Step F: Access to personal information 92 years after the 2011 National Household Survey

Question F1 ensures that each person is given the opportunity to make an informed decision about what happens to the personal information provided on the National Household Survey questionnaire. It is only if you answer “Yes” to this question that your 2011 NHS information might be released in 92 years. If you wish to change your answer to this question, write to the Coordinator, Access to Information and Privacy, Statistics Canada, 100 Tunney’s Pasture Driveway, Ottawa, Ontario, K1A 0T6.

Question F1 – 92 years

When you are completing this question, you should check with each person in the household to obtain their views before answering the question.

If a person’s view is not known, leave this question blank for that person.

For children, only answer this question if agreement is given by their parent or legal guardian. If not known, leave this question blank for that person.

For people legally unable to make a choice, legal guardians can answer on their behalf. If not known, leave this question blank.

Step G

Thank you for completing and returning your questionnaire.

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