2006 Census Topic-based tabulations

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Topic-based tabulation: Selected Language Characteristics (165), Registered Indian Status (3), Age Groups (7) and Sex (3) for the Population of Canada, Provinces, Territories and Census Metropolitan Areas, 2006 Census - 20% Sample Data

About this tabulation

General information

Catalogue number :97-558-XCB2006018
Release date :January 15, 2008
Topic :Aboriginal peoples
Data dimensions :

Note

Note: Data quality - Siouan languages (Dakota/Sioux)

When comparing the census results to those of the 2001 Census, it appears that there is some overestimation of persons reporting Siouan languages (Dakota/Sioux) in British Columbia and, as a result, also at the Canada level. Although it affects a relatively small population, it is best to apply caution when analysing the census data for Siouan languages (Dakota/Sioux) in these geographies.

For more information on factors that may explain such variances in census data, such as response errors and processing errors, please refer to the 2006 Census Dictionary, Appendix B Data quality, sampling and weighting, confidentiality and random rounding.

Note: Data on knowledge of official languages

According to studies on data certification, the 2006 Census statistics on knowledge of official languages could underestimate the category 'English and French' and overestimate the category 'French only,' particularly for the francophone population, but also for the whole population in general. More information on the subject will be available in the Languages Reference Guide, to be published in 2008.

Note: Non-permanent residents and the census universe

In the 2006 Census, non-permanent residents are defined as people from another country who, at the time of the census, held a Work or Study Permit, or who were refugee claimants, as well as family members living in Canada with them. In the 1991, 1996 and 2001 censuses, non-permanent residents also included persons who held a Minister's permit; this was discontinued by Citizenship and Immigration Canada prior to the 2006 Census.

From 1991 on, the Census of Population has enumerated both permanent and non-permanent residents of Canada. Prior to 1991, only permanent residents of Canada were included in the census. (The only exception to this occurred in 1941.) Non-permanent residents were considered foreign residents and were not enumerated.

Total population counts, as well as counts for all variables, are affected by this change in the census universe. Users should be especially careful when comparing data from 1991, 1996, 2001 or 2006 with data from previous censuses in geographic areas where there is a concentration of non-permanent residents.

Today in Canada, non-permanent residents make up a significant segment of the population, especially in several census metropolitan areas. Their presence can affect the demand for such government services as health care, schooling, employment programs and language training. The inclusion of non-permanent residents in the census facilitates comparisons with provincial and territorial statistics (marriages, divorces, births and deaths) which include this population. In addition, this inclusion of non-permanent residents brings Canadian practice closer to the United Nations (UN) recommendation that long-term residents (persons living in a country for one year or longer) be enumerated in the census.

Although every attempt has been made to enumerate non-permanent residents, factors such as language difficulties, the reluctance to complete a government form or to understand the need to participate may have affected the enumeration of this population.

For additional information, please refer to the 2006 Census Dictionary, catalogue number 92-566-XWE or 92-566-XPE.

For counts of the non-permanent resident population in 1991, 2001 and 2006, please refer to the 2006 Census table 97-557-XCB2006006.


Note: Population universe

The population universe of the 2006 Census includes the following groups:
- Canadian citizens (by birth or by naturalization) and landed immigrants with a usual place of residence in Canada;
- Canadian citizens (by birth or by naturalization) and landed immigrants who are abroad, either on a military base or attached to a diplomatic mission;
- Canadian citizens (by birth or by naturalization) and landed immigrants at sea or in port aboard merchant vessels under Canadian registry;
- persons with a usual place of residence in Canada who are claiming refugee status and members of their families living with them;
- persons with a usual place of residence in Canada who hold Study Permits and members of their families living with them;
- persons with a usual place of residence in Canada who hold Work Permits and members of their families living with them.

For census purposes, the last three groups in this list are referred to as 'non-permanent residents'. For further information, refer to the variable Immigration: Non-permanent resident found in the 2006 Census Dictionary, catalogue number 92-566-XWE or 92-566-XPE.

Data table

Select data categories for this table


This table details selected language characteristics , registered indian status , age groups and sex for the population in CanadaFootnote 1
Selected language characteristics (165) Registered Indian status (3)
Total - Registered Indian status Registered IndianFootnote 2 Not a Registered Indian
Total population by detailed mother tongueFootnote 3 31,241,030 623,780 30,617,250
Total - Single responsesFootnote 4 30,848,270 612,520 30,235,745
English 17,882,775 423,165 17,459,610
French 6,817,655 24,595 6,793,060
Non-official languages 6,147,840 164,765 5,983,075
Aboriginal languages 210,075 164,565 45,510
Algonquian languages 144,655 134,420 10,240
Algonquin 1,920 1,850 70
Atikamekw 5,245 5,070 180
Blackfoot 3,085 3,050 35
Cree 78,855 71,530 7,330
Malecite 530 505 35
Mi'kmaq 7,365 7,265 105
Montagnais-Naskapi 10,975 10,305 665
Ojibway 24,190 23,240 950
Oji-Cree 11,690 11,485 210
Algonquian languages, n.i.e. 795 130 665
Athapaskan languages 19,015 16,510 2,505
Carrier 1,560 1,475 80
Chilcotin 1,070 1,025 50
Chipewyan 525 460 65
Dene 9,745 7,710 2,035
Dogrib 2,020 1,980 40
Kutchin-Gwich'in (Loucheux) 355 335 20
North Slave (Hare) 1,065 1,020 45
South Slave 1,605 1,555 45
Athapaskan languages, n.i.e. 1,065 945 120
Haida 110 105 10
Iroquoian languages 410 315 95
Mohawk 295 200 90
Iroquoian languages, n.i.e. 120 115 0
Kutenai 155 145 10
Salish languages 3,250 3,065 180
Shuswap 935 885 45
Thompson (Ntlakapamux) 500 490 10
Salish languages, n.i.e. 1,810 1,685 120
Siouan languages (Dakota/Sioux) 5,585 5,480 105
Tlingit 80 75 10
Tsimshian languages 2,170 2,080 95
Gitksan 1,175 1,095 80
Nisga'a 680 670 10
Tsimshian 320 310 10
Wakashan languages 1,090 1,060 30
Nootka 375 370 0
Wakashan languages, n.i.e. 715 690 25
Inuktitut 32,380 330 32,050
Inuinnaqtun 370 10 365
Inuktitut, n.i.e. 32,015 320 31,690
Aboriginal languages, n.i.e. 1,165 980 185
Other single responses 5,937,760 200 5,937,565
Total multiple responsesFootnote 5 392,760 11,260 381,500
English and Aboriginal languageFootnote 6 11,035 9,375 1,660
French and Aboriginal languageFootnote 7 855 590 270
English, French and Aboriginal languageFootnote 8 240 115 125
Other multiple responses 380,625 1,180 379,450
Total population by detailed language spoken most often at homeFootnote 9 31,241,030 623,780 30,617,245
Total - Single responsesFootnote 10 30,665,025 613,655 30,051,370
English 20,584,770 490,570 20,094,200
French 6,608,125 24,035 6,584,085
Non-official languages 3,472,130 99,050 3,373,080
Aboriginal languages 129,340 98,555 30,785
Algonquian languages 87,515 84,075 3,445
Algonquin 385 375 15
Atikamekw 4,745 4,685 60
Blackfoot 1,575 1,570 0
Cree 47,190 44,825 2,365
Malecite 135 135 0
Mi'kmaq 3,985 3,960 20
Montagnais-Naskapi 9,720 9,365 355
Ojibway 11,115 10,745 370
Oji-Cree 8,480 8,375 105
Algonquian languages, n.i.e. 180 35 140
Athapaskan languages 11,225 9,240 1,980
Carrier 605 530 75
Chilcotin 430 415 15
Chipewyan 120 120 10
Dene 7,490 5,745 1,745
Dogrib 1,110 1,095 20
Kutchin-Gwich'in (Loucheux) 25 20 0
North Slave (Hare) 655 625 25
South Slave 600 570 30
Athapaskan languages, n.i.e. 185 115 70
Haida 0 0 0
Iroquoian languages 30 10 15
Mohawk 20 10 10
Iroquoian languages, n.i.e. 10 0 10
Kutenai 15 15 0
Salish languages 510 495 20
Shuswap 250 240 15
Thompson (Ntlakapamux) 50 50 0
Salish languages, n.i.e. 205 200 10
Siouan languages (Dakota/Sioux) 3,780 3,730 45
Tlingit 10 0 0
Tsimshian languages 565 545 20
Gitksan 320 310 10
Nisga'a 180 170 10
Tsimshian 65 55 10
Wakashan languages 115 115 0
Nootka 10 10 0
Wakashan languages, n.i.e. 105 105 10
Inuktitut 25,360 175 25,185
Inuinnaqtun 70 0 65
Inuktitut, n.i.e. 25,285 170 25,120
Aboriginal languages, n.i.e. 210 150 65
Other single responses 3,342,790 495 3,342,295
Total multiple responsesFootnote 11 576,005 10,120 565,880
English and Aboriginal languageFootnote 12 9,680 8,420 1,260
French and Aboriginal languageFootnote 13 695 615 80
English, French and Aboriginal languageFootnote 14 75 55 20
Other multiple responses 565,550 1,030 564,520
Total population by knowledge of Aboriginal languagesFootnote 15 31,241,030 623,780 30,617,245
Total - Single responsesFootnote 16 20,015,415 403,660 19,611,755
English 15,697,475 384,095 15,313,380
French 3,851,775 11,760 3,840,015
Non-official languages 466,165 7,805 458,360
Aboriginal languages 12,725 7,635 5,090
Algonquian languages 7,180 6,885 295
Algonquin 60 55 0
Atikamekw 860 850 15
Blackfoot 25 25 0
Cree 3,495 3,330 165
Malecite 0 0 0
Mi'kmaq 85 85 0
Montagnais-Naskapi 1,070 1,000 65
Ojibway 705 685 20
Oji-Cree 880 855 25
Algonquian languages, n.i.e. 10 0 0
Athapaskan languages 745 645 100
Carrier 10 0 0
Chilcotin 30 25 0
Chipewyan 10 0 0
Dene 465 380 90
Dogrib 105 100 0
Kutchin-Gwich'in (Loucheux) 0 0 0
North Slave (Hare) 50 45 0
South Slave 75 70 0
Athapaskan languages, n.i.e. 10 10 0
Haida 0 0 0
Iroquoian languages 0 0 0
Mohawk 0 0 0
Iroquoian languages, n.i.e. 0 0 0
Kutenai 0 0 0
Salish languages 10 10 0
Shuswap 10 10 0
Thompson (Ntlakapamux) 0 0 0
Salish languages, n.i.e. 10 0 0
Siouan languages (Dakota/Sioux) 60 55 0
Tlingit 0 0 0
Tsimshian languages 10 10 0
Gitksan 0 0 0
Nisga'a 10 10 0
Tsimshian 0 0 0
Wakashan languages 0 0 0
Nootka 0 0 0
Wakashan languages, n.i.e. 0 0 0
Inuktitut 4,710 30 4,685
Inuinnaqtun 15 0 15
Inuktitut, n.i.e. 4,695 25 4,670
Aboriginal languages, n.i.e. 10 0 10
Other single responses 453,435 170 453,270
Total multiple responsesFootnote 17 11,225,615 220,120 11,005,495
English and Aboriginal language(s)Footnote 18 217,295 172,085 45,205
French and Aboriginal language(s)Footnote 19 14,515 13,120 1,395
English, French and Aboriginal language(s)Footnote 20 11,825 7,625 4,200
Other multiple responses 10,981,980 27,285 10,954,695

Footnotes

Footnote 1

Excludes census data for one or more incompletely enumerated Indian reserves or Indian settlements.

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Footnote 2

Registered or Treaty Indian: The expression 'Registered Indian' refers to those persons who reported they were registered under the Indian Act of Canada. Treaty Indians are persons who are registered under the Indian Act and can prove descent from a band that signed a treaty.

The Registered Indian counts in this table may differ from the administrative counts maintained by the Department of Indian Affairs and Northern Development, with the most important causes of these differences being the incompletely enumerated Indian reserves and Indian settlements as well as methodological and conceptual differences between the two sources.

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Footnote 3

Mother tongue refers to the first language learned at home in childhood and still understood by the individual at the time of the census.

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Footnote 4

Indicates the number of persons who reported only one language as their mother tongue.

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Footnote 5

Indicates the number of persons who reported more than one language as their mother tongue.

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Footnote 6

Indicates the number of persons who reported English and one Aboriginal language as their mother tongue.

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Footnote 7

Indicates the number of persons who reported French and one Aboriginal language as their mother tongue.

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Footnote 8

Indicates the number of persons who reported English, French and one Aboriginal language as their mother tongue.

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Footnote 9

Refers to the language spoken most often at home by the individual at the time of the census. The data on home language shown in this table are not comparable to data found in similar tables produced for the 2001 Census when home language referred to the language spoken most often at home and the language spoken on a regular basis at home.

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Footnote 10

Indicates the number of persons who reported only one language spoken most often at home.

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Footnote 11

Indicates the number of persons who reported more than one language spoken most often at home.

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Footnote 12

Indicates the number of persons who reported English and one Aboriginal language spoken most often at home.

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Footnote 13

Indicates the number of persons who reported French and one Aboriginal language spoken most often at home.

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Footnote 14

Indicates the number of persons who reported English, French and one Aboriginal language spoken most often at home.

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Footnote 15

Refers to the ability to conduct a conversation in an Aboriginal language.

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Footnote 16

Indicates the number of persons who reported knowledge of only one language, either as an official or a non-official language. For example, the category 'English' includes persons who reported knowledge of English only without reporting knowledge of any non-official language(s).

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Footnote 17

Indicates the number of persons who reported multiple official and/or non-official languages.

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Footnote 18

Indicates the number of persons who reported knowledge of English and at least one Aboriginal language.

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Footnote 19

Indicates the number of persons who reported knowledge of French and at least one Aboriginal language.

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Footnote 20

Indicates the number of persons who reported knowledge of English, French and at least one Aboriginal language.

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Source: Statistics Canada, 2006 Census of Population, Statistics Canada Catalogue no. 97-558-XCB2006018.

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Footnotes

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