Statistics Canada
Symbol of the Government of Canada

(Note: Content area on this page may be wider than usual.)

Warning View the most recent version.

Archived Content

Information identified as archived is provided for reference, research or recordkeeping purposes. It is not subject to the Government of Canada Web Standards and has not been altered or updated since it was archived. Please contact us to request a format other than those available.

2006 Census of Canada: Topic-based tabulations

Employment Income Groups (23) in Constant (2005) Dollars, Age Groups (7A), Highest Certificate, Diploma or Degree (5), Work Activity in the Reference Year (3) and Sex (3) for the Population 15 Years and Over of Canada, Provinces, Territories, Census Metropolitan Areas and Census Agglomerations, 2000 and 2005 - 20% Sample Data

Select data categories for this product
[Geographic index]




Canada Warning
Employment income groups (23) Year (2)
2000 2 2005 3
Note(s) :
  1. Census metropolitan areas and census agglomerations crossing provincial boundaries
    There is one census metropolitan area (Ottawa - Gatineau) and three census agglomerations (Campbellton, Hawkesbury and Lloydminster) that cross provincial boundaries. The data for their respective provincial parts are included with the appropriate census metropolitan area or census agglomeration, with data for the census metropolitan area or census agglomeration within the province of the provincial part that contributes the majority of the population to the area. For example, Ottawa - Gatineau can be found in Ontario, Campbellton in New Brunswick, Hawkesbury in Ontario and Lloydminster in Alberta.
  1. TOTAL - HIGHEST CERTIFICATE, DIPLOMA OR DEGREE
    'Highest certificate, diploma or degree' refers to the highest certificate, diploma or degree completed based on a hierarchy which is generally related to the amount of time spent 'in-class.' For postsecondary completers, a university education is considered to be a higher level of schooling than a college education, while a college education is considered to be a higher level of education than in the trades. Although some trades requirements may take as long or longer to complete than a given college or university program, the majority of time is spent in on-the-job paid training and less time is spent in the classroom.
  2. 2000
    Canadian censuses were conducted in 2001 and 2006. Income data from these censuses relate to the calendar year prior to the census year, i.e., 2000 and 2005 respectively. For additional information, please refer to the 2006 Census Dictionary, Catalogue no. 92-566-XWE.
  3. 2005
    Canadian censuses were conducted in 2001 and 2006. Income data from these censuses relate to the calendar year prior to the census year, i.e., 2000 and 2005 respectively. For additional information, please refer to the 2006 Census Dictionary, Catalogue no. 92-566-XWE.
  4. TOTAL - EMPLOYMENT INCOME GROUPS
    Earnings or employment income - Refers to total income received by persons 15 years of age and over during calendar year 2005 as wages and salaries, net income from a non-farm unincorporated business and/or professional practice, and/or net farm self-employment income.

    Wages and salaries - Refers to gross wages and salaries before deductions for such items as income tax, pensions and Employment Insurance. Included in this source are military pay and allowances, tips, commissions and cash bonuses, benefits from wage-loss replacement plans or income-maintenance insurance plans, supplementary unemployment benefits from an employer or union as well as all types of casual earnings during calendar year 2005. Other employment income such as taxable benefits, research grants and royalties are included.

    Net farm income - Refers to net income (gross receipts from farm sales minus depreciation and cost of operation) received during calendar year 2005 from the operation of a farm, either on the respondent's own account or in partnership. In the case of partnerships, only the respondent's share of income was reported. Included with gross receipts are cash advances received in 2005, dividends from cooperatives, rebates and farm support payments to farmers from federal, provincial and regional agricultural programs (For example, milk subsidies and marketing board payments) and gross insurance proceeds such as payments from the Net Income Stabilization Account (NISA). The value of income 'in kind,' such as agricultural products produced and consumed on the farm, is excluded.

    Net non-farm income - Refers to net income (gross receipts minus expenses of operation such as wages, rents and depreciation) received during calendar year 2005 from the respondent's non-farm unincorporated business or professional practice. In the case of partnerships, only the respondent's share was reported. Also included is net income from persons babysitting in their own homes, persons providing room and board to non relatives, self-employed fishers, hunters and trappers, operators of direct distributorships such as those selling and delivering cosmetics, as well as freelance activities of artists, writers, music teachers, hairdressers, dressmakers, etc.

    Receipts not counted as income - The income concept excludes gambling gains and losses, lottery prizes, money inherited during the year in a lump sum, capital gains or losses, receipts from the sale of property, income tax refunds, loan payments received, lump sum settlements of insurance policies, rebates received on property taxes, refunds of pension contributions as well as all income 'in kind,' such as free meals and living accommodations, or agricultural products produced and consumed on the farm.

    Average income of individuals - Average income of individuals refers to the weighted mean total income of individuals 15 years of age and over who reported income for 2005. Average income is calculated from unrounded data by dividing the aggregate income of a specified group of individuals (e.g., males 45 to 54 years of age) by the number of individuals with income in that group.

    Median income of individuals - The median income of a specified group of income recipients is that amount which divides their income size distribution into two halves, i.e., the incomes of the first half of individuals are below the median, while those of the second half are above the median. Median income is calculated from the unrounded number of individuals (e.g., males 45 to 54 years of age) with income in that group.

    Standard error of average income - Refers to the estimated standard error of average income for an income size distribution. If interpreted as shown below, it serves as a rough indicator of the precision of the corresponding estimate of average income. For about 68% of the samples which could be selected from the sample frame, the difference between the sample estimate of average income and the corresponding figure based on complete enumeration would be less than one standard error. For about 95% of the possible samples, the difference would be less than two standard errors and, in about 99% of the samples, the difference would be less than approximately two and one half standard errors.

    Average and median incomes and standard errors of average income of individuals will be calculated for those individuals who are at least 15 years of age and who have an income (positive or negative). For all other universes (families (census/economic), persons 15 years of age and over not in families or private households), these statistics will be calculated over all units, whether or not they reported any income.

    These statistics can be derived for after-tax income, earnings, wages and salaries, or any other particular source of income in the same manner.
  5. WITH EMPLOYMENT INCOME
    Earner or employment income recipient - Refers to a person 15 years of age and over who received wages and salaries, net income from a non-farm unincorporated business and/or professional practice, and/or net farm self-employment income during calendar year 2005.
  6. UNDER $2,000
    Including loss.
  7. MEDIAN EMPLOYMENT INCOME $
    For persons with employment income.
  8. AVERAGE EMPLOYMENT INCOME $
    For persons with employment income.
  9. STANDARD ERROR OF AVERAGE EMPLOYMENT INCOME $
    For persons with employment income.
Warning Data quality note(s)
  • Excludes census data for one or more incompletely enumerated Indian reserves or Indian settlements.
Total - Employment income groups 4 23,901,360 25,664,220
Without employment income 7,485,575 7,462,960
With employment income 5 16,415,785 18,201,265
Under $2,000 6 1,080,070 1,476,235
$2,000 to $4,999 1,102,505 1,219,960
$5,000 to $6,999 707,190 753,470
$7,000 to $9,999 789,400 1,074,375
$10,000 to $11,999 629,600 652,385
$12,000 to $14,999 748,400 875,075
$15,000 to $19,999 1,114,525 1,335,345
$20,000 to $24,999 1,297,250 1,250,960
$25,000 to $29,999 1,113,685 1,189,780
$30,000 to $34,999 1,311,050 1,199,260
$35,000 to $39,999 971,370 1,065,810
$40,000 to $44,999 1,089,215 961,660
$45,000 to $49,999 581,235 809,060
$50,000 to $59,999 1,316,465 1,272,415
$60,000 to $69,999 893,900 955,590
$70,000 to $79,999 556,385 672,890
$80,000 and over 1,113,530 1,436,985
Median employment income $ 7 28,123 26,850
Average employment income $ 8 35,619 36,301
Standard error of average employment income $ 9 25 34
Source: Statistics Canada, 2006 Census of Population, Statistics Canada catalogue no. 97-563-XCB2006054 (Canada, Code01)