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2006 Census of Canada: Topic-based tabulations

Visible Minority Groups (15), Immigrant Status and Period of Immigration (9), Age Groups (10) and Sex (3) for the Population of Canada, Provinces, Territories, Census Metropolitan Areas and Census Agglomerations, 2006 Census - 20% Sample Data

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Montréal Warning
Visible minority groups (15) Immigrant status and period of immigration (9)
Total - Immigrant status and period of immigration Non-immigrants 1 Immigrants 2 Before 1991 1991 to 2000 1991 to 1995 1996 to 2000 2001 to 2006 3 Non-permanent residents 4
Note(s) :
  1. Census metropolitan areas and census agglomerations crossing provincial boundaries
    There is one census metropolitan area (Ottawa - Gatineau) and three census agglomerations (Campbellton, Hawkesbury and Lloydminster) that cross provincial boundaries. The data for their respective provincial parts are included with the appropriate census metropolitan area or census agglomeration, with data for the census metropolitan area or census agglomeration within the province of the provincial part that contributes the majority of the population to the area. For example, Ottawa - Gatineau can be found in Ontario, Campbellton in New Brunswick, Hawkesbury in Ontario and Lloydminster in Alberta.
  1. NON-IMMIGRANTS
    Non-immigrants are persons who are Canadian citizens by birth. Although most Canadian citizens by birth were born in Canada, a small number were born outside Canada to Canadian parents.
  2. IMMIGRANTS
    Immigrants are persons who are, or have ever been, landed immigrants in Canada. A landed immigrant is a person who has been granted the right to live in Canada permanently by immigration authorities. Some immigrants have resided in Canada for a number of years, while others are recent arrivals. Most immigrants are born outside Canada, but a small number were born in Canada. Includes immigrants who landed in Canada prior to Census Day, May 16, 2006.
  3. 2001 TO 2006
    Includes immigrants who landed in Canada prior to Census Day, May 16, 2006.
  4. NON-PERMANENT RESIDENTS
    Non-permanent residents are persons from another country who, at the time of the census, held a Work or Study Permit or who were refugee claimants, as well as family members living with them in Canada.
  5. TOTAL VISIBLE MINORITY POPULATION
    The Employment Equity Act defines visible minorities as 'persons, other than Aboriginal peoples, who are non-Caucasian in race or non-white in colour'.
  6. SOUTH ASIAN
    For example, 'East Indian', 'Pakistani', 'Sri Lankan', etc.
  7. SOUTHEAST ASIAN
    For example, 'Vietnamese', 'Cambodian', 'Malaysian', 'Laotian', etc.
  8. WEST ASIAN
    For example, 'Iranian', 'Afghan', etc.
  9. VISIBLE MINORITY, N.I.E.
    The abbreviation 'n.i.e.' means 'not included elsewhere'. Includes respondents who reported a write-in response such as 'Guyanese', 'West Indian', 'Kurd', 'Tibetan', 'Polynesian', 'Pacific Islander', etc.
  10. MULTIPLE VISIBLE MINORITY
    Includes respondents who reported more than one visible minority group by checking two or more mark-in circles, e.g., 'Black' and 'South Asian'.
  11. NOT A VISIBLE MINORITY
    Includes respondents who reported 'Yes' to the Aboriginal identity question (Question 18) as well as respondents who were not considered to be members of a visible minority group.
Warning Data quality note(s)
  • Excludes census data for one or more incompletely enumerated Indian reserves or Indian settlements.
  • Data quality index showing, for the short census questionnaire (100% data), a global non response rate higher than or equal to 5% but lower than 10%.
  • Data quality index showing, for the long census questionnaire (20% sample data), a global non response rate higher than or equal to 5% but lower than 10%.
  • 2001 adjusted count; most of these are the result of boundary changes.
Total - Population by visible minority groups 3,588,520 2,806,235 740,355 384,440 190,570 97,515 93,055 165,345 41,930
Total visible minority population 5 590,380 177,750 386,590 150,635 128,810 66,700 62,105 107,155 26,035
Chinese 72,010 17,430 52,070 17,440 16,975 8,125 8,850 17,660 2,510
South Asian 6 70,615 20,910 46,560 15,380 18,430 9,015 9,410 12,750 3,145
Black 169,065 67,890 94,510 44,580 27,265 14,190 13,075 22,660 6,665
Filipino 23,510 6,135 15,505 5,445 7,045 3,985 3,055 3,020 1,870
Latin American 75,400 16,510 54,130 20,565 18,155 11,335 6,820 15,415 4,755
Southeast Asian 7 44,965 14,215 29,940 20,855 6,760 4,490 2,270 2,325 805
Arab 98,880 23,525 71,395 18,730 25,625 11,665 13,965 27,035 3,960
West Asian 8 14,520 2,285 11,480 2,685 5,010 2,150 2,860 3,785 755
Korean 4,660 730 3,140 935 1,220 550 670 985 790
Japanese 2,985 1,440 1,080 375 355 135 225 350 465
Visible minority, n.i.e. 9 3,505 1,305 2,105 1,280 655 330 325 170 95
Multiple visible minority 10 10,250 5,360 4,670 2,370 1,310 735 575 995 210
Not a visible minority 11 2,998,140 2,628,490 353,765 233,805 61,765 30,820 30,945 58,190 15,895
Source: Statistics Canada, 2006 Census of Population, Statistics Canada catalogue no. 97-562-XCB2006011 (Montréal, Code462)