NHS Focus on Geography Series – Montréal


Aboriginal Peoples

Demographic characteristics of Aboriginal people

In 2011, 0.7% (26,285) of the population of Montréal had an Aboriginal identity.Aboriginal Peoples Footnote 1 Of those, 56.1% (14,750) reported a First Nations identityAboriginal Peoples Footnote 2 only, 33.6% (8,840) reported a Métis identity only, and 3.4% (900) reported an Inuit identity only. An additional 1,400, or 5.3%, reported other Aboriginal identities and 395, or 1.5%, reported more than one Aboriginal identity.

Table 1 – Population by Aboriginal identity, Montréal

Table summary

This table presents the population by Aboriginal identity. The column headings are: population; Montréal and Quebec. The columns Montréal and Quebec are divided into number, percentage of total population and percentage of Aboriginal identity population. The rows are: total population; Aboriginal identity population; First Nations single identity; First Nations single identity (Registered or Treaty Indian); First Nations single identity (not a Registered or Treaty Indian); Métis single identity; Inuit single identity; multiple Aboriginal identities; Aboriginal identities not included elsewhere; non-Aboriginal identity population.

Table 1 – Population by Aboriginal identity, Montréal, Quebec
Population Montréal Quebec
Number % of total population % of Aboriginal identity population Number % of total population % of Aboriginal identity population
Total population in private households 3,752,470 100.0 ... 7,732,520 100.0 ...
   Aboriginal identity population 26,285 0.7 100.0 141,915 1.8 100.0
      First Nations single identity 14,750 0.4 56.1 82,425 1.1 58.1
         First Nations single identity (Registered or Treaty Indian) 4,210 0.1 16.0 52,650 0.7 37.1
         First Nations single identity (not a Registered or Treaty Indian) 10,540 0.3 40.1 29,775 0.4 21.0
      Métis single identity 8,840 0.2 33.6 40,955 0.5 28.9
      Inuit single identity 900 0.0 3.4 12,570 0.2 8.9
      Multiple Aboriginal identities 395 0.0 1.5 1,550 0.0 1.1
      Aboriginal identities not included elsewhere 1,400 0.0 5.3 4,415 0.1 3.1
   Non-Aboriginal identity population 3,726,190 99.3 ... 7,590,605 98.2 ...

In general, the Aboriginal population in Canada is younger than the non-Aboriginal population.

In Montréal, Aboriginal children aged 14 and under represented 17.7% of the total Aboriginal population and 0.7% of all children in Montréal. Non-Aboriginal children aged 14 and under accounted for 16.8% of the non-Aboriginal population.

The age distribution of First Nations people, Métis and Inuit is shown in table 2.

Table 2 – Age distribution by Aboriginal identity, Montréal

Table summary

This table presents the population by Aboriginal identity and distribution by various age groups. The column headings are: population; Montréal and Quebec. The column percentage distribution by age groups is shown for Montréal and Quebec and is further divided into: total - age groups; 0 to 14 years; 15 to 24 years; 25 to 64 years; 65 years and over. The rows are: total population; Aboriginal identity population; First Nations single identity; First Nations single identity (Registered or Treaty Indian); First Nations single identity (not a Registered or Treaty Indian); Métis single identity; Inuit single identity; multiple Aboriginal identities; Aboriginal identities not included elsewhere; non-Aboriginal identity population.

Table 2 – Age distribution by Aboriginal identity, Montréal, Quebec
Population Montréal Quebec
Total – Age groups 0 to 14 years 15 to 24 years 25 to 64 years 65 years and over Total – Age groups 0 to 14 years 15 to 24 years 25 to 64 years 65 years and over
Percentage (%) distribution by age groups Percentage (%) distribution by age groups
Total population in private households 100.0 16.9 13.1 56.6 13.5 100.0 16.3 12.6 56.5 14.6
   Aboriginal identity population 100.0 17.7 15.0 57.1 10.1 100.0 23.7 16.2 51.7 8.4
      First Nations single identity 100.0 17.0 14.6 56.8 11.6 100.0 25.0 16.5 49.9 8.5
         First Nations single identity (Registered or Treaty Indian) 100.0 17.2 13.4 58.1 11.4 100.0 28.9 17.4 47.0 6.7
         First Nations single identity (not a Registered or Treaty Indian) 100.0 16.8 15.0 56.3 11.7 100.0 18.3 15.1 54.9 11.7
      Métis single identity 100.0 18.4 15.8 59.2 6.6 100.0 18.6 14.4 58.7 8.4
      Inuit single identity 100.0 27.2 26.1 40.6 6.1 100.0 35.3 21.5 39.5 3.5
      Multiple Aboriginal identities 100.0 21.5 12.7 60.8 2.5 100.0 20.6 16.8 52.9 9.7
      Aboriginal identities not included elsewhere 100.0 13.9 8.6 56.8 20.7 100.0 12.6 12.3 55.9 19.1
   Non-Aboriginal identity population 100.0 16.8 13.1 56.6 13.5 100.0 16.1 12.5 56.6 14.7

Living arrangements of Aboriginal children

In Montréal, 54.1% of Aboriginal children aged 14 and under lived in a familyAboriginal Peoples Footnote 3 with both their parents (biological or adoptive) and 33.5% lived in a lone-parent family.Aboriginal Peoples Footnote 4 Other Aboriginal children in that age group were stepchildren,Aboriginal Peoples Footnote 5 grandchildren living in a skip-generation family,Aboriginal Peoples Footnote 6 foster childrenAboriginal Peoples Footnote 7 or children living with other relatives.

Living arrangements of First Nations, Métis and Inuit children aged 14 and under are illustrated in table 3.

Table 3 – Percentage distribution of the population aged 14 and under by living arrangement for selected Aboriginal identity categories, Montréal

Table summary

This table presents the percentage distribution of the population aged 14 and under by living arrangement for selected Aboriginal identity categories. The column headings are: living arrangements; percentage distribution of the population for: total Aboriginal identity population; First Nations single identity; Métis single identity; Inuit single identity; non-Aboriginal identity population. The rows are: total population aged 14 and under; children of both parents; stepchildren; children of lone parent; of male lone parent; of female lone parent; grandchildren in skip-generation family; foster children; children living with other relatives.

Table 3 – Percentage distribution of the population aged 14 and under by living arrangement for selected Aboriginal identity categories, Montréal
Living arrangements Total Aboriginal identity population First Nations single identity Métis single identity Inuit single identity Non-Aboriginal identity population
Percentage (%) distribution of the population
Table note(s):
Footnote 1

Includes children in a two-parent family where there may also be step siblings or half-siblings present. Also includes children in a two-parent family for whom it cannot be determined if they are stepchildren.

Return to footnote 3-1 referrer

Footnote 2

Non-relatives may be present.

Return to footnote 3-2 referrer

Footnote 3

This category excludes foster children.

Return to footnote 3-3 referrer

Total population aged 14 and under 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0
   Children of both parentsTable 3 Footnote 1 54.1 54.3 54.2 32.7 74.0
   Stepchildren 10.3 10.2 11.7 4.1 6.5
   Children of lone parent 33.5 33.5 33.2 46.9 18.9
      Of male lone parent 5.6 3.8 7.1 12.2 3.3
      Of female lone parent 27.9 29.7 26.2 34.7 15.5
   Grandchildren in skip-generation family 0.2 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.2
   Foster children 1.2 0.6 0.9 8.2 0.3
   Children living with other relativesTable 3 Footnote 2,Table 3 Footnote 3 0.9 1.2 0.0 0.0 0.2

Language and Aboriginal peoples

In Montréal, 720 Aboriginal people, or 2.7% of the population who had an Aboriginal identity, responded that they were able to conduct a conversation in an Aboriginal language. In 2011, the Aboriginal language most frequently reported by Aboriginal people was: Inuktitut (230).

In 2011, 1.9% of the Aboriginal identity population reported an Aboriginal language as mother tongue, defined as the first language learned at home in childhood and still understood.

As well, 1.9% of Aboriginal people reported speaking an Aboriginal language at home: 0.9% spoke it most often while another 1.0% spoke it on a regular basis.

Linguistic characteristics of First Nations people, Métis and Inuit are shown in tables 4 to 6.

Table 4 – Number and proportion of Aboriginal identity population, First Nations people, Métis and Inuit for selected Aboriginal language indicators, Montréal

Table summary

This table presents number and proportion of Aboriginal identity population, First Nations people, Métis and Inuit for selected Aboriginal language indicators. The column headings are: selected Aboriginal language indicators; total Aboriginal identity population; First Nations single identity; Métis single identity; Inuit single identity. The last four columns are divided into number and percentage of population. The rows are: ability to conduct a conversation in an Aboriginal language; Aboriginal language as mother tongue; Aboriginal language spoken at least regularly at home; Aboriginal language spoken most often at home; Aboriginal language spoken regularly at home.

Table 4 – Number and proportion of Aboriginal identity population, First Nations people, Métis and Inuit for selected Aboriginal language indicators, Montréal
Selected Aboriginal language indicators Total Aboriginal identity population First Nations single identity Métis single identity Inuit single identity
numberTable 4 Footnote 1 % of population number % of population number % of population number % of population
Table note(s):
Footnote 1

The estimates for the three Aboriginal groups do not add to the total Aboriginal identity population because only selected Aboriginal identity categories are shown.

Return to footnote 4-1 referrer

Footnote 2

This category excludes individuals who reported speaking one Aboriginal language most often at home and speaking another Aboriginal language regularly at home. These individuals are included only in the category 'Aboriginal language spoken most often at home.'

Return to footnote 4-2 referrer

Ability to conduct a conversation in an Aboriginal language 720 2.7 425 2.9 60 0.7 230 25.6
Aboriginal language as mother tongue 505 1.9 280 1.9 40 0.5 185 20.6
Aboriginal language spoken at least regularly at home 495 1.9 270 1.8 40 0.5 180 20.0
   Aboriginal language spoken most often at home 225 0.9 135 0.9 0 0.0 75 8.3
   Aboriginal language spoken regularly at homeTable 4 Footnote 2 270 1.0 135 0.9 30 0.3 105 11.7

In Montréal, 46.9% of the Aboriginal identity population reported that they were able to conduct a conversation only in English or only in French. Additionally, 52.9% of Aboriginal people reported that they were able to conduct a conversation in both of Canada's official languages. The other 0.2%, or 40, reported that they were not able to conduct a conversation in either of these two languages.

Table 5 – Percentage distribution of the population by knowledge of official languages for selected Aboriginal identity categories, Montréal

Table summary

This table presents the percentage distribution of the population by knowledge of official languages for selected Aboriginal identity categories. The column headings are: knowledge of official languages; percentage distribution of the population for: total Aboriginal identity population; First Nations single identity; Métis single identity; Inuit single identity; non-Aboriginal identity population. The rows are: total population; English only; French only; English and French; neither English nor French.

Table 5 – Percentage distribution of the population by knowledge of official languages for selected Aboriginal identity categories, Montréal
Knowledge of official languages Total Aboriginal identity population First Nations single identity Métis single identity Inuit single identity Non-Aboriginal identity population
Percentage (%) distribution of the population
Total population in private households 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0
   English only 7.1 7.9 3.7 35.6 7.3
   French only 39.8 39.3 42.4 18.9 36.7
   English and French 52.9 52.6 53.8 45.0 54.4
   Neither English nor French 0.2 0.1 0.0 0.0 1.6

In Montréal, among the 720 Aboriginal people who reported being able to conduct a conversation in an Aboriginal language, 61.1% reported that same language as their mother tongue. The other 39.6% reported a different language, such as English or French, as mother tongue, which suggests these individuals have acquired an Aboriginal language as a second language.

On the other hand, among the 505 Aboriginal people who reported an Aboriginal language as mother tongue, 12.9% could no longer conduct a conversation in this language, despite the fact that they still understand it.

Table 6 – Population who reported an ability to conduct a conversation in an Aboriginal language that is not their mother tongue and population who reported an Aboriginal mother tongue but who could not conduct a conversation in that language, for selected Aboriginal identity categories, Montréal

Table summary

This table presents the population who reported an ability to conduct a conversation in an Aboriginal language that is not their mother tongue and the population who reported an Aboriginal mother tongue but who could not conduct a conversation in that language, for selected Aboriginal identity categories. The column headings are: selected Aboriginal identity categories; persons reporting an ability to conduct a conversation in an Aboriginal language that is not their mother tongue; persons reporting an Aboriginal mother tongue but who could not conduct a conversation in that language. The last two columns are divided into number and percentage of population. The rows are: total Aboriginal identity population; First Nations single identity; Métis single identity; Inuit single identity; non-Aboriginal identity population.

Table 6 – Population who reported an ability to conduct a conversation in an Aboriginal language that is not their mother tongue and population who reported an Aboriginal mother tongue but who could not conduct a conversation in that language, for selected Aboriginal identity categories, Montréal
Selected Aboriginal identity categories Persons reporting an ability to conduct a conversation in an Aboriginal language that is not their mother tongue Persons reporting an Aboriginal mother tongue but who could not conduct a conversation in that language
numberTable 6 Footnote 1 % of population numberTable 6 Footnote 1 % of population
Table note(s):
Footnote 1

The estimates for the three Aboriginal groups do not add to the total Aboriginal identity population because only selected Aboriginal identity categories are shown.

Return to footnote 6-1 referrer

Total Aboriginal identity population 285 39.6 65 12.9
   First Nations single identity 195 45.9 50 17.9
   Métis single identity 25 41.7 0 0.0
   Inuit single identity 60 26.1 0 0.0
Non-Aboriginal identity population 175 92.1 0 0.0

Note(s):

Footnote 1

Aboriginal identity: The term 'Aboriginal identity' refers to whether the person reported being an Aboriginal person, that is, First Nations (North American Indian), Métis or Inuk (Inuit) and/or being a Registered or Treaty Indian, (that is, registered under the Indian Act of Canada) and/or being a member of a First Nation or Indian band. Aboriginal peoples of Canada are defined in the Constitution Act, 1982, section 35 (2) as including the Indian, Inuit and Métis peoples of Canada.

Aboriginal Peoples Return to footnote 1 referrer

Footnote 2

Respondents self-identified as 'First Nations (North American Indian)' on the NHS questionnaire; however, the term 'First Nations people' is used throughout this document.

Aboriginal Peoples Return to footnote 2 referrer

Footnote 3

Family: The term 'family' in this document refers to the census definition of 'census family,' but for simplicity, the term 'family' is used throughout this report. A census family is composed of a married or common-law couple, with or without children, or of a lone parent living with at least one child in the same dwelling. Couples can be of the opposite sex or of the same sex.

Aboriginal Peoples Return to footnote 3 referrer

Footnote 4

Lone parents: Mothers or fathers, with no married spouse or common-law partner present, living in a dwelling with one or more children.

Aboriginal Peoples Return to footnote 4 referrer

Footnote 5

Stepchild: A stepchild is a child in a couple family who is the biological or adopted child of only one married spouse or common-law partner in the couple, and whose birth or adoption preceded the current relationship.

Aboriginal Peoples Return to footnote 5 referrer

Footnote 6

Skip-generation family: A census family that consists of grandparents and grandchildren without the presence of parents in the home.

Aboriginal Peoples Return to footnote 6 referrer

Footnote 7

Foster children: The population in private households who have been reported as foster children on the NHS questionnaire. Foster children are considered as 'other relatives' outside of a census family.

Aboriginal Peoples Return to footnote 7 referrer

Immigration and Ethnocultural Diversity

Immigrant population

According to the 2011 National Household Survey (NHS), 846,650 (22.6%) of the population of the Montréal census metropolitan area (CMA) were foreign-born (immigrants), 2,847,210 (75.9%) were Canadian-born (non-immigrants) and 58,620 (1.6%) were non-permanent residents.Ethnocultural Footnote 1 In comparison, the proportion of the population of Quebec who were immigrants was 12.6%, 86.5% were non-immigrants, and 0.9% were non-permanent residents.

Figure 1 Percentage of Canadian born (non-immigrants), foreign born (immigrants) and non permanent residents in Montréal (CMA)

Figure description

This vertical bar graph shows the percentage of Canadian born (non-immigrants), foreign born (immigrants) and non-permanent residents. The y-axis is the percentage of population and the x-axis, from left to right, shows Canadian born (non-immigrants), foreign born (immigrants) and non-permanent residents.

Of the immigrants living in Montréal in 2011, 189,730 came to Canada between 2006 and 2011. These recent immigrants made up 22.4% of the immigrants in Montréal.

The three most common countries of birth of immigrants living in Montréal were: Haiti (accounting for 7.7% of the immigrant population in Montréal), Italy (6.5%) and France (5.5%). In comparison, the top three countries of birth of immigrants living in Quebec were: Haiti (accounting for 7.1% of the immigrant population in Quebec), France (6.9%) and Italy (5.9%).

Table – Immigrants by country of birth, Montréal (CMA)

Table summary

This table shows the most common countries of birth of immigrants. The column headings are: immigrants by country of birth along with the selected geography showing both numbers and percentages. The rows are: total immigrants and the most common countries of birth of immigrants.

Table – Immigrants by country of birth, Montréal (CMA)
Immigrants by country of birth Montréal (CMA) Quebec
Count % Rank Count % Rank
Total immigrants 846,650 100.0 ... 974,895 100.0 ...
   Haiti 65,140 7.7 1 69,070 7.1 1
   Italy 55,380 6.5 2 57,710 5.9 3
   France 46,540 5.5 3 67,650 6.9 2

In 2011, among Montréal's immigrant population, 54.7% spoke English and/or French most often at home. Meanwhile, the three most frequently reported non-official languages spoken most often at home by immigrants in Montréal were Arabic, Spanish and Italian. This compared to the top three non-official languages for immigrants in Quebec, which were Arabic, Spanish and Italian.Ethnocultural Footnote 2

Immigrants by non-official languages spoken most often at home, Montréal (CMA)

Table summary

This table presents the most common non-official language spoken most often at home for immigrants. The column headings are: immigrants by non-official language spoken most often at home with the selected geography showing both numbers and percentages. The rows are: the most common non-official language spoken most often at home.

Immigrants by non-official languages spoken most often at home, Montréal (CMA)
Immigrants by non-official language spoken most often at homeEthnocultural Footnote 2 Montréal (CMA) Quebec
Count % Rank Count % Rank
Arabic 79,525 9.4 1 86,265 8.8 1
Spanish 62,585 7.4 2 75,005 7.7 2
Italian 37,220 4.4 3 37,785 3.9 3

The median age of immigrants in Montréal was 31.9 years in 2011, compared to 31.5 years for the immigrant population at the provincial level.

Visible minority population and ethnic origins

The 2011 NHS estimated that 762,325 individuals in the Montréal belonged to a visible minority group, accounting for 20.3% of its total population.Ethnocultural Footnote 1 In comparison, visible minorities comprised 11.0% of Quebec's population.

The three largest visible minority groups living in Montréal were Black, Arab and Latin American. In Quebec, the three largest visible minority groups were Black, Arab and Latin American.

The median age of the visible minority population in Montréal was 31.9 years in 2011, compared to 31.5 years for the visible minority population at the provincial level.

Table – Population showing visible minority groups, Montréal (CMA) , Quebec, and Canada

Table summary

This table shows the population by visible minority groups. The column headings are: population showing visible minority groups along with the selected geography showing both numbers and percentages. The rows are: total population; total visible minority population; South Asian; Chinese; Black; Filipino; Latin American; Arab; Southeast Asian; West Asian; Korean; Japanese; visible minority, n.i.e., multiple visible minorities and not a visible minority.

Table – Population showing visible minority groups, Montréal (CMA) , Quebec, and Canada
Population showing visible minority groups Montréal (CMA) Quebec Canada
Count % Count % Count %
Total population in private households 3,752,475 100.0 7,732,520 100.0 32,852,320 100.0
   Total visible minority population 762,325 20.3 850,240 11.0 6,264,750 19.1
      South Asian 79,540 2.1 83,320 1.1 1,567,400 4.8
      Chinese 74,375 2.0 82,850 1.1 1,324,750 4.0
      Black 216,310 5.8 243,625 3.2 945,665 2.9
      Filipino 30,215 0.8 31,490 0.4 619,310 1.9
      Latin American 98,005 2.6 116,380 1.5 381,280 1.2
      Arab 150,510 4.0 166,260 2.2 380,620 1.2
      Southeast Asian 59,430 1.6 65,855 0.9 312,080 0.9
      West Asian 21,835 0.6 23,450 0.3 206,840 0.6
      Korean 5,910 0.2 6,660 0.1 161,125 0.5
      Japanese 3,135 0.1 4,025 0.1 87,265 0.3
      Visible minority, n.i.e. 7,555 0.2 8,900 0.1 106,475 0.3
      Multiple visible minorities 15,510 0.4 17,420 0.2 171,935 0.5
   Not a visible minority 2,990,150 79.7 6,882,285 89.0 26,587,575 80.9

The three most frequently reported ethnic origins in Montréal, for people reporting either one or multiple ethnic origins, were Canadian, French and Italian. This compared to the top three in Quebec, which were Canadian, French and Irish.

Table – Most frequently reported ethnic origins, Montréal (CMA)

Table summary

This table shows the most common ethnic origins. The column headings are: ethnic origin along with the selected geography showing both numbers and percentages. The rows are: the most common ethnic origins.

Table – Most frequently reported ethnic origins, Montréal (CMA)
Most frequently reported ethnic origins Montréal (CMA) Quebec
Count % Rank Count % Rank
   Canadian 1,677,930 44.7 1 4,571,990 59.1 1
   French 945,535 25.2 2 2,246,705 29.1 2
   Italian 263,565 7.0 3 307,810 4.0 4

Religion

According to the 2011 NHS, 85.1% of the population in the Montréal reported a religious affiliation, while 14.9% said they had no religious affiliation.Ethnocultural Footnote 1 At the provincial level, 87.9% of the population reported a religious affiliation, while 12.1% had no religious affiliation.

The most frequently reported religious affiliation in Montréal was Roman Catholic, reported by 2,372,085 (63.2%) of the population. Other frequently reported religions included: Muslim (5.9%) and Jewish (2.2%). In comparison, the top three most frequently reported religions in Quebec were: Roman Catholic (reported by 74.6% of the population of Quebec), Muslim (3.1%) and Christian, n.i.e. (1.4%).

Table – Most frequently reported religions, Montréal (CMA)

Table summary

This table shows the most common religions. The column headings are: religion along with the selected geography showing both numbers and percentages. The rows are: the most common religions.

Table – Most frequently reported religions, Montréal (CMA)
Most frequently reported religions Montréal (CMA) Quebec
Count % Rank Count % Rank
Total population in private households 3,752,475 100.0 ... 7,732,520 100.0 ...
   Total reporting a religious affiliation 3,191,820 85.1 ... 6,794,975 87.9 ...
      Roman Catholic 2,372,085 63.2 1 5,766,750 74.6 1
      Muslim 221,040 5.9 2 243,430 3.1 2
      Jewish 83,200 2.2 3 85,100 1.1 4
   Total not reporting a religious affiliation 560,650 14.9 ... 937,545 12.1 ...

Note(s):

Footnote 1

For details on the concepts, definitions, universes, variables and geographic terms used in the 2011 National Household Survey, please consult the National Household Survey Dictionary, Catalogue no. 99-000-X. For detailed explanations on concepts and for information on data quality, please refer to the reference guides found on the NHS website.

Ethnocultural Return to footnote 1 referrer

Footnote 2

These counts include both single non-official language responses and multiple language responses. A multiple language response is a combination of non-official language response with a response of English and/or French.

Ethnocultural Return to footnote 2 referrer

Education

Educational attainment Education Footnote 1

In 2011, 62.8% of the 2,628,370 adults aged 25 years and over in Montréal had completed some form of postsecondary education, compared with 59.6% at the national level.

Of the population aged 25 years and over in Montréal, 32.7% had a university certificate or degree. An additional 16.0% had a college diploma and 14.1% had a trades certificate.

The share of the adult population that had completed a high school diploma as their highest level of educational attainment was 20.0%, and 17.2% had completed neither high school nor any postsecondary certificates, diplomas or degrees.

Table 1 – Population aged 25 and over by highest level of educational attainmentEducation Footnote 1, Montréal (CMA), Quebec, Canada

Table summary

This table presents the population aged 25 years and over by highest level of educational attainment. The column headings are: highest level of educational attainment; Montréal, Quebec and Canada, which are divided in number and percentage. The rows are: total population aged 25 years and over; no certificate, diploma or degree; high school diploma; a subtotal for postsecondary certificate, diploma or degree: trades certificate which is a subtotal of the rows for trades certificate or diploma (other than apprenticeship) and registered apprenticeship certificate; college diploma; university certificate below bachelor; university degree which is a subtotal of the rows for bachelor's degree; university certificate above bachelor; degree in medicine, dentistry, veterinary medicine or optometry; master's degree; earned doctorate.

Table 1 – Population aged 25 and over by highest level of educational attainment
Highest level of educational attainment Montréal Quebec Canada
Number % Number % Number %
Total – Population aged 25 years and over 2,628,370 100.0 5,499,490 100.0 22,935,460 100.0
No certificate, diploma or degree 453,075 17.2 1,108,545 20.2 3,956,620 17.3
High school diplomaEducation Footnote 2 525,420 20.0 1,102,860 20.1 5,300,080 23.1
Postsecondary certificate, diploma or degree 1,649,885 62.8 3,288,085 59.8 13,678,765 59.6
Trades certificateEducation Footnote 3 369,910 14.1 957,225 17.4 2,744,380 12.0
Trades certificate or diploma (other than apprenticeship) 260,425 9.9 682,930 12.4 1,596,595 7.0
Registered Apprenticeship certificateEducation Footnote 4 109,485 4.2 274,295 5.0 1,147,790 5.0
College diplomaEducation Footnote 5 421,780 16.0 899,710 16.4 4,487,520 19.6
University certificate below bachelorEducation Footnote 6 160,445 6.1 285,970 5.2 1,100,325 4.8
University degreeEducation Footnote 7 697,750 26.5 1,145,180 20.8 5,346,530 23.3
Bachelor's degree 424,825 16.2 717,340 13.0 3,347,425 14.6
University certificate above bachelorEducation Footnote 8 78,615 3.0 122,265 2.2 571,525 2.5
Degree in medicine, dentistry, veterinary medicine or optometry 18,745 0.7 31,235 0.6 151,715 0.7
Master's degree 145,500 5.5 227,315 4.1 1,068,190 4.7
Earned doctorate 30,065 1.1 47,025 0.9 207,680 0.9

Overall, successive generations of Canadians have been completing high school and attaining postsecondary qualifications in increasing proportions. In 2011, 41.7% of Canadians aged 65 years and over had a postsecondary credential; this compares with 69.5% among adults between the ages of 25 and 44. As well, 35.7% of those aged 65 years and over had not completed any certificate, diploma or degree compared with 9.5% of individuals aged 25 to 44.

In Montréal, 38.9% of those aged 65 years and over had a postsecondary credential, compared to 75.9% of adults aged 25 to 44; 37.6% of individuals aged 65 years and over had no certificate, diploma or degree, compared to 9.1% of 25 to 44 year-olds.

Montréal (CMA) – Proportion of the population aged 25 years and over by level of educational attainment and age groups This product was revised on October 7, 2014.

Figure description

This vertical bar graph shows the proportion of the population aged 25 years and over by level of educational attainment and age groups. The age groups are: 25 to 44, 45 to 64 and 65 and over. The y-axis is the percentage of the population and the x-axis is level of educational attainment including: No certificate, diploma or degree; High school diploma; Trades certificate; College diploma; University certificate below bachelor; Bachelor's degree; University above bachelor.

Major field of study

Table 2 – Most common fields of studyEducation Footnote 9 for the population aged 25 years and over with postsecondary qualifications by level of educational attainmentEducation Footnote 1, Montréal (CMA), Quebec, Canada

Table summary

This table presents the five most common fields of study by level of educational attainment for the population aged 25 years and over with postsecondary qualifications. The column headings are: field of study; Montréal, Quebec and Canada, which are divided in number, percentage and rank. The rows are: the five most common fields of study under the educational attainment levels of: trades certificate; college diploma; university.

Montréal (CMA) – Proportion of the population aged 25 years and over by level of educational attainment and age groups Table 2 Canada, #currentGeo# – Most common fields of study for the population aged 25 years and over with postsecondary qualifications by level of educational attainment
Field of study Montréal Quebec Canada
Number % Rank Number % Rank Number % Rank
Trades certificate
Business, management, marketing and related support services 64,725 17.5 1 159,510 16.7 1 329,330 12.0 3
Mechanic and repair technologies/technicians 51,755 14.0 2 145,335 15.2 2 485,755 17.7 1
Personal and culinary services 46,105 12.5 3 117,510 12.3 3 328,125 12.0 4
Construction trades 42,960 11.6 4 111,680 11.7 4 434,090 15.8 2
Health professions and related programs 42,770 11.6 5 97,915 10.2 6 283,665 10.3 6
College diploma
Business, management, marketing and related support services 112,125 26.6 1 243,835 27.1 1 1,242,870 27.7 1
Health professions and related programs 56,005 13.3 2 126,850 14.1 2 787,660 17.6 2
Engineering technologies and engineering-related fields 37,235 8.8 3 85,315 9.5 3 413,205 9.2 3
Computer and information sciences and support services 28,775 6.8 4 52,960 5.9 4 212,800 4.7 5
Visual and performing arts 28,220 6.7 5 43,360 4.8 5 170,725 3.8 6
UniversityEducation Footnote 10
Business, management, marketing and related support services 210,425 24.5 1 334,330 23.4 1 1,215,210 18.8 1
Engineering 98,245 11.4 2 137,850 9.6 4 686,100 10.6 4
Education 96,745 11.3 3 216,005 15.1 2 921,390 14.3 2
Health professions and related programs 78,185 9.1 4 143,120 10.0 3 702,280 10.9 3
Social sciences 49,405 5.8 5 76,845 5.4 5 429,185 6.7 5

Location of studyEducation Footnote 11

In 2011, there were 1,649,885 residents of Montréal aged 25 years and over with postsecondary credentials. Of these graduates, 80.1% had studied in Quebec, 3.0% had studied in another province or territory and 16.9% had studied outside Canada. Nationally, 72.5% of graduates had studied in the same province/territory in which they lived in 2011, 10.4% had studied in another province or territory and 17.1% had studied outside Canada.

In all provinces, individuals with trades or college certificates were more likely than those with university credentials to have earned their highest certificate, diploma or degree in the province in which they lived in 2011.

Table 3 – Population aged 25 years and over with postsecondary qualifications by location of study and by level of educational attainment, Montréal (CMA)

Table summary

This table presents location of study compared with the province or territory of residence in 2011 for the population aged 25 years and over with postsecondary qualifications by level of educational attainment. The column headings are: educational attainment; location of study divided into studied in Quebec, studied in another province / territory, studied outside Canada further divided in number and percentage. The rows are: total population aged 25 years and over with postsecondary qualifications; trades certificate; college diploma; university certificate below bachelor; bachelor's degree; university above bachelor.

Table 3 – Population aged 25 years and over with postsecondary qualifications by location of study and by level of educational attainment, Montréal
Educational attainment Location of study
Studied in Quebec Studied in another province/territory Studied outside Canada
number % number % number %
Total population aged 25 years and over with postsecondary qualifications 1,320,860 80.1 49,460 3.0 279,565 16.9
Trades certificate 331,705 89.7 5,300 1.4 32,910 8.9
College diploma 365,860 86.7 9,845 2.3 46,065 10.9
University certificate below bachelor 122,270 76.2 3,715 2.3 34,455 21.5
Bachelor's degree 323,455 76.1 18,030 4.2 83,335 19.6
University above bachelor 177,570 65.1 12,560 4.6 82,795 30.3

Note(s):

Footnote 1

The terms 'Educational attainment,' 'level of educational attainment' and 'highest level of educational attainment' used in this document refer to the Highest certificate, diploma or degree completed by a person. The portion of the population that completed each type of education noted is the portion that completed it as their highest certificate, diploma or degree.

Education return to footnote 1 referrer

Footnote 2

'High school diploma' refers to 'secondary (high) school diploma or equivalent.'

Education return to footnote 2 referrer

Footnote 3

'Trades certificate' refers to 'apprenticeship or trades certificate or diploma,' and is an aggregation which includes both 'Registered Apprenticeship certificate' as well as 'trades certificate or diploma (other than apprenticeship).'

Education return to footnote 3 referrer

Footnote 4

'Registered Apprenticeship certificate' includes those with a certificate of qualification/journeyperson's designation.

Education return to footnote 4 referrer

Footnote 5

'College diploma' refers to 'college, CEGEP or other non-university certificate or diploma.'

Education return to footnote 5 referrer

Footnote 6

'University certificate below bachelor' refers to 'university certificate or diploma below bachelor level.' Comparisons with other data sources suggest that this category was over-reported in the NHS. It is recommended that users interpret the results for this category with caution. For further information, please refer to the Education Reference Guide, National Household Survey.

Education return to footnote 6 referrer

Footnote 7

'University degree' refers to 'university certificate, diploma or degree at bachelor level or above.'

Education return to footnote 7 referrer

Footnote 8

'University certificate above bachelor' refers to 'university certificate or diploma above bachelor level'.

Education return to footnote 8 referrer

Footnote 9

'Field of study' in this table is classified based on the 2-digit series from the Classification of Instructional Programs (CIP) Canada 2011. It is the major field of study for the highest postsecondary certificate, diploma or degree completed by the person.

Education return to footnote 9 referrer

Footnote 10

'University' in this table refers to 'university certificate, diploma or degree,' and includes all university certificates, diplomas and degrees including university certificates below the bachelor level, bachelor's degrees and university certificates and degrees above the bachelor level.

Education return to footnote 10 referrer

Footnote 11

'Location of study' refers to the province, territory or country of the institution where the highest postsecondary certificate, diploma or degree was completed. Here, location of study is compared with province or territory of residence to indicate whether the location of study is the same province or territory as the person's residence in 2011, a different Canadian province or territory, or outside Canada.

Education return to footnote 11 referrer

Labour

Labour

In Montréal, 1,897,615 people were employed and 158,525 were unemployed for a total labour force of 2,056,135 in May 2011. The employment rate was at 60.8% and the unemployment rate was at 7.7%.

Table 1 Total population aged 15 years and over by labour force status, Montréal (CMA), Quebec

Table summary

This table presents the labour force status for the population aged 15 years and over. The column headings are: labour force status; Montréal and Quebec. The rows are: total population aged 15 years and over with sub-totals of: in the labour force (number) and not in the labour force (number). In the labour force (number) there are two components: employed (number) and unemployed (number). Rates are also presented for: participation rate (%); employment rate (%); and unemployment rate (%).

Table 1 Total population aged 15 years and over by labour force status
Labour force status Montréal Quebec
Table note(s):
Footnote 1

In the past, this variable was called Labour force activity.

Labour: Return to footnote 1-1 referrer

Total population aged 15 years and overLabour Table 1 Footnote 1 3,120,055 6,474,590
In the labour force 2,056,135 4,183,445
Employed 1,897,615 3,880,420
Unemployed 158,525 303,025
Not in the labour force 1,063,920 2,291,145
Participation rate 65.9 64.6
Employment rate 60.8 59.9
Unemployment rate 7.7 7.2

Within Montréal, 12.9% of the employed labour force was aged 15 to 24 and 13.9% was aged 55 to 64. This compares to 13.3% and 14.8% respectively for Quebec.

Table 2 Employed labour force by age groups, Montréal (CMA), Quebec

Table summary

This table presents the employed labour force by selected age groups. The column headings are: age groups and Montréal and Quebec, which are divided in number and percentage. The rows are: total; age groups; 15 to 24 years; 25 to 34 years; 35 to 54 years; 55 to 64 years; 65 years and over.

Table 2 Employed labour force by age groups
Age groups Montréal Quebec
number % number %
Total 1,897,615 100.0 3,880,420 100.0
15 to 24 years 244,230 12.9 518,030 13.3
25 to 34 years 418,250 22.0 820,080 21.1
35 to 54 years 915,700 48.3 1,860,310 47.9
55 to 64 years 264,650 13.9 573,220 14.8
65 years and over 54,780 2.9 108,780 2.8

Within Montréal, the top occupations were: Retail salespersons; Administrative assistants; Retail and wholesale trade managers. For Quebec as a whole the top occupations were: Retail salespersons; Administrative assistants; Cashiers.

Table 3 Top occupations for the employed labour force, Montréal (CMA), Quebec

Table summary

This table presents the top occupations. The column headings are: occupation, Montréal and Quebec, which are divided in number and percentage. The rows are: the top occupations.

Table 3 Top occupations for the employed labour force
Occupation Montréal Quebec
number % Rank number % Rank
Retail salespersons 79,400 4.2 1 158,000 4.1 1
Administrative assistants 51,440 2.7 2 114,170 2.9 2
Retail and wholesale trade managers 39,780 2.1 3 80,140 2.1 4
Cashiers 37,460 2.0 4 81,560 2.1 3
Early childhood educators and assistants 34,100 1.8 5 71,335 1.8 5
Food counter attendants, kitchen helpers and related support occupations 31,365 1.7 6 66,345 1.7 6
Registered nurses and registered psychiatric nurses 29,730 1.6 7 63,850 1.6 7
Administrative officers 28,090 1.5 8 60,000 1.5 8
Other customer and information services representatives 27,665 1.5 9 44,055 1.1 17
Financial auditors and accountants 27,165 1.4 10 45,800 1.2 16

Within Montréal, the top industries were: Elementary and secondary schools; Hospitals; Full-service restaurants. For Quebec as a whole the top industries were: Elementary and secondary schools; Hospitals; Grocery stores.

Table 4 Top industries for the employed labour force, Montréal (CMA), Quebec

Table summary

This table presents the top industries. The column headings are: industry, Montréal and Quebec, which are divided in number and percentage. The rows are: the top industries.

Table 4 Top industries for the employed labour force
Industry Montréal Quebec
number % Rank number % Rank
Elementary and secondary schools 85,935 4.5 1 182,775 4.7 1
Hospitals 83,095 4.4 2 173,015 4.5 2
Full-service restaurants 54,565 2.9 3 106,475 2.7 4
Grocery stores 48,610 2.6 4 108,535 2.8 3
Depository credit intermediation 41,810 2.2 5 70,035 1.8 10
Computer systems design and related services 41,525 2.2 6 59,140 1.5 13
Local, municipal and regional public administration 40,600 2.1 7 81,115 2.1 7
Child day-care services 34,095 1.8 8 72,465 1.9 9
Nursing and residential care facilities 33,820 1.8 9 79,650 2.1 8
Universities 32,735 1.7 10 53,110 1.4 16

The number of self-employed in Montréal amounted to 205,165 or 10.8% of all total employed workers.

Table 5 Employed labour force by class of workers, Montréal (CMA), Quebec

Table summary

This table presents class of worker. The column headings are: class of worker; Montréal and Quebec, which are divided in number and percentage. The rows are: total employed labour force; with subtotals of employee (number and percent) and total – self-employed (number and percent). The total – self-employed there are two components: self-employed (incorporated or unincorporated) and unpaid family worker.

Table 5 Employed labour force by class of workers
Class of worker Montréal Quebec
number % number %
Table note(s):
Footnote 1

Includes self-employed with an incorporated business and self-employed with an unincorporated business. Also included among the self-employed are unpaid family workers.

Return to footnote 5-1 referrer

Total employed labour force 1,897,615 100.0 3,880,420 100.0
Employee 1,692,450 89.2 3,465,775 89.3
Total – Self-employedTable 5 Footnote 1 205,165 10.8 414,650 10.7
Self-employed (incorporated or unincorporated) 201,970 10.6 406,800 10.5
Unpaid family worker 3,195 0.2 7,845 0.2

In 2011, 22.2% of commuters within Montréal used public transit to get to work. This compares to Quebec at 13.3%. 66.4% of the population used a car, truck or van as a driver, while 3.4% used a car, truck or van as a passenger. The average commuting time to work in Montréal was 29.7 minutes, this compares to Quebec at 25.2 minutes.

Within Montréal, 85.3% of the employed labour force aged 15 years and over worked at their usual place, 5.9% worked at home and 8.5% had no fixed workplace address.

Table 6 Employed labour force by mode of transportation, Montréal (CMA), Quebec

Table summary

This table presents the employed labour force by mode of transportation. The column headings are: mode of transportation; Montréal and Quebec, which are divided in number and percentage. The rows are: total employed labour force with a usual place of work or no fixed workplace address; car, truck or van as driver; car, truck or van as passenger; public transit; walked; bicycle; other.

Table 6 Employed labour force by mode of transportation
Mode of transportation Montréal Quebec
number % number %
Total employed labour force with a usual place of work or no fixed workplace address 1,779,360 100.0 3,633,085 100.0
Car, truck or van as driver 1,181,980 66.4 2,713,295 74.7
Car, truck or van as passenger 60,155 3.4 136,495 3.8
Public transit 395,685 22.2 484,595 13.3
Walked 95,160 5.3 215,215 5.9
Bicycle 31,075 1.7 48,870 1.3
Other 15,310 0.9 34,620 1.0

Table 7 Average commuting duration for the employed labour force, Montréal (CMA), Quebec

Table summary

This table presents the average commuting duration. The column headings are: average commuting duration; Montréal and Quebec. The row includes the average commuting duration.

Table 7 Average commuting duration for the employed labour force
Commuting duration Montréal Quebec
Average 29.7 25.2

Table 8 Employed Labour force by time leaving for work, Montréal (CMA), Quebec

Table summary

This table presents time leaving for work. The column headings are: time leaving for work; Montréal and Quebec, which are divided in number and percentage. The rows are: total; 5 to 5:59 a.m.; 6 to 6:59 a.m.; 7 to 7:59 a.m.; 8 to 8:59 a.m.; 9 to 11:59 a.m.; 12 p.m. to 4:59 a.m.

Table 8 Employed Labour force by time leaving for work
Time leaving for work Montréal Quebec
number % number %
Total 1,779,360 100.0 3,633,085 100.0
5 to 5:59 a.m. 134,805 7.6 249,210 6.9
6 to 6:59 a.m. 318,625 17.9 679,010 18.7
7 to 7:59 a.m. 506,355 28.5 1,137,025 31.3
8 to 8:59 a.m. 373,445 21.0 737,375 20.3
9 to 11:59 a.m. 196,665 11.1 327,620 9.0
12 p.m. to 4:59 a.m. 249,465 14.0 502,850 13.8

Table 9 Employed labour force by place of work status, Montréal (CMA), Quebec

Table summary

This table presents place of work. The column headings are: place of work; Montréal and Quebec, which are divided in number and percentage. The rows are: total; usual place of work; worked at home; worked outside Canada; no fixed workplace address.

Table 9 Employed labour force by place of work status
Place of work Montréal Quebec
number % number %
Total employed labour force 1,897,615 100.0 3,880,420 100.0
Usual place of work 1,618,045 85.3 3,301,560 85.1
Worked at home 112,630 5.9 237,625 6.1
Worked outside Canada 5,620 0.3 9,705 0.3
No fixed workplace address 161,315 8.5 331,520 8.5

In Montréal, 18.6% (401,075) of the population aged 15 years and over who worked in 2010 or 2011 reported English only as the language used most often at work, 71.6% (1,543,440) reported French only and 8.2% (177,215) said they used both official languages (English and French) equally. In addition, 0.7% of the population aged 15 years and over who worked in 2010 or 2011 reported using an official language and a non-official language equally most often at work and 0.9% a non-official language only.

Furthermore, 26.9% (580,060) of the population aged 15 years and over who worked in 2010 or 2011 reported working in English on a regular basis, 9.9% (212,520) in French on a regular basis and 0.1% (1,120) in the country's two official languages on a regular basis. In addition, 0.7% (15,685) of of the population aged 15 years and over who worked in 2010 or 2011 reported using an official language and a non-official language on a regular basis at work and 1.6% (33,775) a non-official language only.

In Quebec, 11.9% (526,790) of the population aged 15 years and over who worked in 2010 or 2011 reported English only as the language used most often at work, 81.6% (3,614,285) reported French only and 5.3 (235,475) said they used both official languages (English and French) equally. Furthermore, 0.4% of the population aged 15 years and over who worked in 2010 or 2011 reported using an official language and a non-official language equally most often at work.

As for the language used at work on a regular basis in Quebec, the proportions are as follows: 21.3% (944,195) reported using English; 6.4% (284,730) use French; 0.0% (1,550) use both official languages; 0.4% (19,325) reported using an official language and a non-official language; and 1.0% (43,905) a non-official language only.

Table 10 Languages used at work, Montréal (CMA), Quebec

Table summary

This table presents the languages used most often and regularly at work. The column headings are: languages used at work; language used most often at work and language used regularly at work for Montréal and Quebec, which are divided in number and percentage. The rows are: Total population 15 years and over who worked since 2010; English only; French only; other language only; English and French; English and other language; French and other language; English, French and other language.

Table 10 Languages used at work
Languages used at work Language used most often Language used regularlyTable 1 Footnote 1
Montréal Quebec Montréal Quebec
number % number % number % number %
Table note(s):
Footnote 1

Other than the language spoken most often.

Return to footnote 1-1 referrer

Total population aged 15 years and over who worked since 2010 2,156,170 100.0 4,426,985 100.0 843,165 39.1 1,293,710 29.2
English only 401,075 18.6 526,790 11.9 580,060 26.9 944,195 21.3
French only 1,543,440 71.6 3,614,285 81.6 212,520 9.9 284,730 6.4
Other language only 18,390 0.9 31,755 0.7 33,775 1.6 43,905 1.0
English and French 177,215 8.2 235,475 5.3 1,120 0.1 1,550 0.0
English and other language 4,085 0.2 4,865 0.1 10,180 0.5 12,895 0.3
French and other language 3,785 0.2 4,770 0.1 5,445 0.3 6,355 0.1
English, French and other language. 8,180 0.4 9,040 0.2 65 0.0 75 0.0
None ... ... ... ... 1,313,000 60.9 3,133,275 70.8

In Montréal, the non-official languages most used, most often or regularly, with or without an official language, are Spanish, Chinese languages and Arabic, which account respectively for 0.5% (22,160), 0.3% (11,050) and 0.2% (9,470) of the population aged 15 years and over who worked in 2010 or 2011.

In Quebec, the non-official languages most used, most often or regularly, with or without an official language, are Spanish, Chinese languages and Arabic, which account respectively for 0.3% (29,245), 0.1% (11,740) and 0.1% (10,185) of the population aged 15 years and older who worked in 2010 or 2011.

Table 11 Non-official languages used at work, Montréal (CMA), Quebec

Table summary

This table presents non-official languages used at work. The column headings are: languages used at work; language used at least regularly at work, language used most often at work and language used regularly at work for Montréal and Quebec, which are divided in number and percentage. The rows are the top non-official languages used at least regularly at work.

Table 11 Non-official languages used at work
Languages used at work Language used at least regularlyTable 2 Footnote 2 Language used most oftenTable 2 Footnote 2 Language used regularlyTable 2 Footnote 1,Table 2 Footnote 3
Montréal Quebec Montréal Quebec Montréal Quebec
number % rank number % rank number % rank number % rank number % rank number % rank
Table note(s):
Footnote 1

Other than the language spoken most often.

Return to footnote 2-1 referrer

Footnote 2

Percentages calculated over the population aged 15 years and over who worked in 2010 or 2011.

Return to footnote 2-2 referrer

Footnote 3

Percentages calculated over the population aged 15 years and over who worked in 2010 or 2011 and who declared one or more languages used regularly at work.

Return to footnote 2-3 referrer

Spanish 22,160 0.5 1 29,245 0.3 1 6,790 0.3 2 8,775 0.2 1 15,370 1.8 1 20,470 1.6 1
Chinese languages 11,050 0.3 2 11,740 0.1 2 7,070 0.3 1 7,385 0.2 2 3,980 0.5 4 4,355 0.3 4
Arabic 9,470 0.2 3 10,185 0.1 3 4,115 0.2 3 4,305 0.1 4 5,360 0.6 3 5,880 0.5 3
Italian 9,455 0.2 4 9,805 0.1 4 2,880 0.1 4 2,960 0.1 6 6,575 0.8 2 6,845 0.5 2
Greek 3,615 0.1 5 3,730 0.0 7 1,460 0.1 6 1,485 0.0 9 2,155 0.3 5 2,250 0.2 5
Income

Income composition

The total income for the population in private households can be broken down into two basic components: market incomeIncome Footnote 1 and government transfers.Income Footnote 2 In Montréal, 86.6% of total income was from market income in 2010 and 13.4% was from government transfers. (Aggregate total income for Montréal was 113.4 billion dollars in 2010.)

Figure 1 Income composition for the population in private households in 2010

Figure description

This stacked horizontal bar figure shows income composition for the population in private households. The y-axis is Canada, Quebec and Montréal. The x-axis is percentage of income composition (market income and government transfer payments).

Market income's main component was employment income. In Montréal, it accounted for $85.00 of every $100 of market income, slightly above the figure for Quebec of $84.40. For the two components of employment income, wages and salaries represented $79.00 and net income from self-employment, $6.10.

The other components of market income were smaller than employment income: in Montréal, investment income represented $5.30 per $100 of market income, retirement income, $7.70 and $2.00 came from other private sources of money.

The government transfers received in Montréal were Canada Pension Plan or Quebec Pension Plan with $25.40 of every $100 of total government transfers received, Old Age Security (OAS) pension and Guaranteed Income Supplement ($24.60), Other income from government sources ($18.90), Child benefits ($16.30), and Employment Insurance benefits ($14.80).

Table 1 – Income composition for the population in private households in 2010, Montréal, Quebec, Canada

Table summary

This table shows income composition for the population in private households in 2010. The column headings are: income composition, Montréal, Quebec and Canada. The rows are: aggregate total income in millions of dollars which has main components of market income and government transfer payments. Market income is further divided into: employment income in percentage (including wages and salaries in percentage and self-employment income in percentage); investment income in percentage; retirement pensions, superannuation and annuities in percentage; other money income. Government transfer payments is further divided into: Canada / Quebec pension plan benefits in percentage; Old Age Security pension and Guaranteed Income Supplement in percentage; employment insurance benefits in percentage; child benefits in percentage and other income from government sources in percentage. Also included are income taxes paid (as a percent of total income) and after-tax income (as a percent of total income).

Table 1 – Income composition for the population in private households in 2010, Montréal, Quebec, Canada
Income composition Montréal (CMA) Quebec Canada
Aggregate total income (million $) 113,392.0 224,780.4 1,053,582.1
Composition of total income in 2010 (%) 100.0 100.0 100.0
Market income (%) 86.6 85.0 87.6
Employment income (%) 73.7 71.7 74.7
Wages and salaries (%) 68.4 66.8 70.3
Self-employment income (%) 5.3 4.9 4.4
Investment income (%) 4.6 4.1 4.6
Retirement pensions, superannuation and annuities (%) 6.6 7.6 6.7
Other money income (%) 1.8 1.6 1.7
Government transfer payments (%) 13.4 15.0 12.4
Canada/Quebec Pension Plan benefits (%) 3.4 3.9 3.5
Old Age Security pension and Guaranteed Income Supplement (%) 3.3 3.8 3.1
Employment Insurance benefits (%) 2.0 2.4 1.8
Child benefits (%) 2.2 2.2 1.5
Other income from government sources (%) 2.5 2.7 2.6
Income taxes paid – as a % of total income 17.8 16.7 16.4
After-tax income – as a % of total income 82.2 83.3 83.6

High total income

Among the Canadian population in private households aged 15 years and over, ten percent had total incomes of more than $80,400 in 2010. To be in the top five percent, Canadians needed to have a total income of slightly above $102,300 and to be in the top one percent required just over $191,100, nearly seven times the national median income of $27,800.Income Footnote 3

In Montréal, 4.2% percent of the population aged 15 years and over had total income that put them in the top five percent and 1.0% in the top one percent. This compared with 3.3% and 0.7% in Quebec and 5.0% and 1.0% in Canada.

Table 2 – Population aged 15 years and over by total income, Montréal, Quebec, Canada

Table summary

The following table presents the population aged 15 years and over by total income. The column headings are: total income, Montréal, Quebec and Canada. The rows are: population aged 15 years and over by total income (count); without income or less than $27,815 in percentage; without income or less than $12,025 in percentage; $12,025 to $27,814 in percentage; $27,815 and over in percentage; $27,815 to $51,304 in percentage; $51,305 and over in percentage; $80,420 and over (top 10 percent) in percentage; $102,305 and over top 5 percent) in percentage and $191,150 and over (top 1 percent) in percentage.

Table 2 – Population aged 15 years and over by total income, Montréal, Quebec, Canada
Total income Montréal (CMA) Quebec Canada
Population 15 years and over by total income (count) 3,120,055 6,474,590 27,259,525
Without income or less than $27,815 (%) 51.9 51.9 50.0
Without income or less than $12,025 (%) 25.9 24.5 25.0
$12,025 to $27,814 (%) 26.0 27.3 25.0
$27,815 and over (%) 48.1 48.1 50.0
$27,815 to $51,304 (%) 25.9 27.6 25.0
$51,305 and over (%) 22.2 20.6 25.0
$80,420 and over (top 10 percent) (%) 8.0 6.7 10.0
$102,305 and over (top 5 percent) (%) 4.2 3.3 5.0
$191,150 and over (top 1 percent) (%) 1.0 0.7 1.0

A national map showing the spatial distribution of persons with total income in the top five percent of persons with the highest total income is also available. Canada. Percentage of population in top five percent of total income in 2010 by 2011 census division (CD)

Employment income

Of those persons with employment income in Montréal, 49.2% worked full year, full timeIncome Footnote 4 in 2010 compared to 49.0% in Quebec. The median employment income was $44,052 for these workers ($41,963 for those in Quebec).

The top three most common occupations for those working full-year full-time in 2010 in Montréal were Administrative assistants; Retail salespersons; and Retail and wholesale trade managers.

Table 3 – Median earnings of the most common full-year, full-time occupations in 2010, Montréal, Quebec, Canada

Table summary

The following table presents the most common occupations for full-year, full-time workers in 2010. The column headings are: population with earnings who worked full-year, full-time in 2010, Montréal divided into number and median earnings in dollars and Quebec and Canada divided in median earnings in dollars. The rows are the most common occupations.

Table 3 – Median earnings of the most common full-year, full-time occupations in 2010, Montréal, Quebec, Canada
Population with earnings who worked full-year, full-time in 2010Income Footnote 5 Montréal (CMA) Quebec Canada
number median earnings ($) median earnings ($) median earnings ($)
Administrative assistants 29,810 37,894 36,765 39,143
Retail salespersons 28,705 28,562 27,664 30,249
Retail and wholesale trade managers 27,770 38,134 36,326 42,697

Family income

The median after-tax income of economic families in Montréal in 2010 was $61,456, the median for couple families was $67,224 and for lone-parent families, $41,881. For persons not in economic families (persons living alone or with non relatives only), the median after-tax income was $23,667.

These compare to the medians in Quebec of $59,560 for after-tax family income of all economic families, $64,197 for couple families, $41,275 for lone-parent families and $23,120 for persons living alone or without relatives.

Table 4 – Median after-tax income in 2010 for economic families and persons not in economic families, Montréal, Quebec, Canada

Table summary

This table shows median after-tax income in 2010 by economic family structure and sex. The column headings are: economic family structure and sex, Montréal divided into number and median after-tax income in dollars and Quebec and Canada divided into median after-tax income in dollars. The rows are: all economic families (couple families, lone-parent families, other economic families); persons not in economic families (males, females).

Table 4 – Median after-tax income in 2010 for economic families and persons not in economic families, Montréal, Quebec, Canada
Economic family structure and sex Montréal (CMA) Quebec Canada
number median after-tax income ($) median after-tax income ($) median after-tax income ($)
All economic families 1,036,485 61,456 59,560 67,044
Couple families 835,210 67,224 64,197 72,356
Lone-parent families 175,525 41,881 41,275 42,401
Other economic families 25,755 46,671 47,097 55,484
Persons not in economic families 665,855 23,667 23,120 25,761
Males 318,860 24,966 25,167 28,197
Females 346,995 22,657 21,605 23,917

Figure 2 Median after-tax income in 2010 for Montréal, Quebec and Canada

Figure description

The following vertical bar figure shows the median after-tax income in 2010 by economic family structure and sex. The y-axis is the median after-tax income in dollars. The x-axis is economic family structure and sex including: all economic families; couple families; lone-parent families; other economic families; persons not in economic families; males not in economic families and females not in economic families.

Families came in different sizes and larger families may have benefited from pooling of resources and economies of scale. In Montréal, based on their after-tax income adjusted for family size, 43.8% of the population was in the top half of the income distribution, similar to the rate of 42.3% in Quebec.

In Montréal, the percentage of the population in the lowest income decile groupIncome Footnote 6 at 11.8% was higher than in Quebec (10.4%). The percentage of the population in the highest decile group was 7.1%, higher than in Quebec (5.6%).

Table 5 – Population in private households by adjusted after-tax family income in 2010, Montréal, Quebec, Canada

Table summary

The following table shows the population in private households by adjusted after-tax income in 2010. The column headings are: percentage of private households in decile groups of adjusted after-tax income in 2010, Montréal, Quebec and Canada. The rows are: population in private households as count, decile groups.

Table 5 – Population in private households by adjusted after-tax family income in 2010, Montréal, Quebec, Canada
Population in private households by decile groups of adjusted after-tax income in 2010 Montréal (CMA) Quebec Canada
Population in private households (count) 3,752,475 7,732,520 32,852,320
In bottom half of Canadian distribution (%) 56.2 57.7 50.0
In lowest decile (%) 11.8 10.4 10.0
In second decile (%) 11.1 11.5 10.0
In third decile (%) 11.5 12.1 10.0
In fourth decile (%) 11.1 12.1 10.0
In fifth decile (%) 10.7 11.6 10.0
In top half of Canadian distribution (%) 43.8 42.3 50.0
In sixth decile (%) 10.3 10.8 10.0
In seventh decile (%) 9.8 10.1 10.0
In eighth decile (%) 8.9 8.7 10.0
In ninth decile (%) 7.7 7.1 10.0
In highest decile (%) 7.1 5.6 10.0

Low incomeIncome Footnote 7

In the NHS, a relative measure is used to classify persons by income status: the low-income measure based on after-tax income (LIM-AT). For this measure, the income threshold is half the Canadian median of after-tax household income. The income has been adjusted to account for household size. Persons in households with a household income below this thresholdIncome Footnote 8 were considered to be in low income.

Based on the after-tax income low-income measure, the proportion of the population in low income in Montréal was 17.9%, above the rate of 16.7% observed in Quebec. In Montréal, compared to the population of all ages, for persons under 18, the rate was higher (18.7%) and for the population aged 65 years and over, it was higher at 18.4%.

Table 6 – Income status based on after-tax low-income measure (LIM-AT) in 2010, Montréal, Quebec, Canada

Table summary

This table shows income status based on the after-tax low-income measure in 2010. The column headings are: income status, Montréal, Quebec and Canada. The rows are: total - persons in private households for income status statistics (count); proportion in low income (based on LIM-AT) in percentage; under 18 years in percentage; under 6 years in percentage; 18 to 64 in percentage; 65 years and over in percentage.

Table 6 – Income status based on after-tax low-income measure (LIM-AT) in 2010, Montréal, Quebec, Canada
Income status Montréal (CMA) Quebec Canada
Total - Persons in private households for low income (count)Income Footnote 9 3,752,475 7,691,755 32,386,170
Proportion in low income (based on LIM-AT) (%) 17.9 16.7 14.9
Under 18 years (%) 18.7 16.3 17.3
Under 6 years (%) 19.9 16.8 18.1
18 to 64 years (%) 17.6 16.0 14.4
65 years and over (%) 18.4 20.1 13.4

A map showing the proportion of the population in low income within Montréal CMA is also available.

Note(s):

Footnote 1

Market income includes income from all non-government sources such as employment, investments, private pensions and spousal or child support payments.

Income return to footnote 1 referrer

Footnote 2

Government transfers include Canada/Quebec Pension Plan benefits, Old Age Security (OAS) pension and the Guaranteed Income Supplement, Employment Insurance benefits, child benefits and other income from government sources.

Income return to footnote 2 referrer

Footnote 3

The population aged 15 years and over without income and those with negative income are included at the bottom of the distribution.

Income return to footnote 3 referrer

Footnote 4

Full-year, full-time: worked 49 to 52 weeks, mainly full-time.

Income return to footnote 4 referrer

Footnote 5

Only the most common occupations with at least 250 persons with earnings who worked full-year, full-time are presented here.

Income return to footnote 5 referrer

Footnote 6

The income decile group provides a rough ranking of the economic situation of a person based on his or her relative position in the economic families adjusted after-tax income distribution. The population in private households is sorted according to its adjusted after-tax family income and then divided into 10 equal groups each containing 10% of the population.

Income return to footnote 6 referrer

Footnote 7

The low-income estimates from the National Household Survey (NHS) are not directly comparable to estimates from other sources such as earlier censuses or the Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics but comparisons of different groups or geographies with sufficient sample size within the NHS are of good quality.

Income return to footnote 7 referrer

Footnote 8

A household of four with after-tax income below $38,920 would be considered low income and, for a person living alone, the threshold was $19,460.

Income return to footnote 8 referrer

Footnote 9

For the purposes of low-income statistics, households in the territories and in First Nations communities were excluded. The use of a statistic based only on money income could be misleading in areas where there are substantial in-kind transfers or non-cash activities. In Montréal, 0 persons in private households were excluded.

Income return to footnote 9 referrer

Housing

Housing

The number of households in Montréal was 1,613,290. The homeownership rate in Montréal was 55.0% - which was lower than the Quebec homeownership rate of 61.2%.

Table 1 – Housing tenure for all households, Montréal, Quebec, Canada

Table summary

This table shows the number and percentage of households by housing tenure for Montréal, Quebec. The column headings are: housing tenure; Montréal, Quebec and Canada showing number and percentage. The rows are: total households; owner and renter.

Table 1 – Housing tenure for all households, Montréal, Quebec, Canada
Housing tenure Montréal (CMA) Quebec Canada
number percentage percentage percentage
Total households 1,613,290 100.0 100.0 100.0
Owner 887,040 55.0 61.2 69.0
Renter 726,250 45.0 38.6 30.6

Montréal – AffordabilityHousing Footnote 1

Households in Montréal that paid 30% or more of household total income toward shelter costs represented 27.6% of non-farm, non-reserve households with total income greater than zero. This proportion was higher than the Quebec proportion (23.4%).

A lower proportion of owner households paid 30% or more compared to tenant households in Montréal (18.0% for owners versus 39.4% for renters).

Households in Montréal paid an average monthly shelter cost of $943 – which was higher than the Quebec amount of $839. The average monthly shelter cost for tenant households was $743, this was lower than the average monthly shelter cost for owner households of $1,107.

Table 2 – Housing affordability for non-farm, non-reserve households, Montréal, Quebec, Canada

Table summary

This table shows the percentage of households spending 30% or more of 2010 total income on shelter costs for the selected geography. The column headings are: housing indicator; housing tenure; Montréal, Quebec and Canada. The rows are: percentage of households spending 30% or more of 2010 total income on shelter costs and average monthly shelter cost ($). Both are further divided into total, owner and renter.

Table 2 – Housing affordability for non-farm, non-reserve households, Montréal, Quebec, Canada
Housing indicator Housing tenure Montréal (CMA) Quebec Canada
Percentage of households spending 30% or more of 2010 total
income on shelter costsHousing Table 2 Footnote 1
Total 27.6 23.4 25.2
Owner 18.0 14.9 18.5
Renter 39.4 36.8 40.1
Average monthly shelter cost ($) Total 943 839 1,050
Owner 1,107 936 1,141
Renter 743 685 848

Table note(s):

Footnote 1

Excludes households with zero or negative income in 2010.

Housing: Return to footnote 2-1 referrer

Montréal – Need for major repairsHousing Footnote 2

In Montréal, 7.1% of households reported living in dwellings that required major repairs. This was lower than the Quebec proportion of 7.2%. The proportion of households reporting major repair requirements was lower for owners than renters (5.7% for owner-occupied dwellings and 8.7% for renter-occupied dwellings).

Table 3 – Need for major repairs by housing tenure, Montréal, Quebec, Canada

Table summary

This table shows percentage of households who reported that their dwelling was in need of major repairs. The column headings are: housing indicator; housing tenure; Montréal, Quebec and Canada. The row under housing indicator is: percentage of households reporting that their dwelling was in need of major repairs, which is further divided into total, owner and renter.

Table 3 – Need for major repairs by housing tenure, Montréal, Quebec, Canada
Housing indicator Housing tenure Montréal (CMA) Quebec Canada
Percentage of households reporting that their dwelling
was in need of major repairs
Total 7.1 7.2 7.4
Owner 5.7 6.5 6.4
Renter 8.7 8.0 9.1

Montréal – Suitability

In Montréal, 6.8% of households lived in dwellings that were not suitable; that is, the dwelling was crowded because there were not enough bedrooms based on the National Occupancy Standard.Housing Footnote 3 This was higher than the Quebec proportion of 4.8%. The proportion of households living in dwellings that were not suitable was lower for owners than renters (3.8% for owner households and 10.6% for renter households).

Table 4 – Housing suitability by housing tenure, Montréal, Quebec, Canada

Table summary

This table shows percentage of households living in dwellings that were not suitable. The column headings are: housing indicator; housing tenure; Montréal, Quebec and Canada. The rows are: percentage of households living in dwellings that were not suitable, which is further divided into total, owner and renter.

Table 4 – Housing suitability by housing tenure, Montréal, Quebec, Canada
Housing indicator Housing tenure Montréal (CMA) Quebec Canada
Percentage of households living
in dwellings that were not suitable
Total 6.8 4.8 6.0
Owner 3.8 2.8 3.8
Renter 10.6 7.8 10.6

Montréal – Condominium by period of construction

Out of the 1,613,290 households in Montréal, 212,880 lived in condominium dwellings.

Of dwellings built between 2001 and 2011, 75,055 (35.6%) were condominiums. Of dwellings built between 1991 and 2000, 35,545 (22.7%) were condominiums. Between 1981 and 1990, 43,870 (17.7%) were condominiums, and, for 1980 or before, 58,410 (5.9%) were condominiums.

Figure description

This stacked vertical bar chart shows the percentage of condominiums and non-condominiums by period of construction. The y-axis is percentage and x-axis is period of construction including: 1980 or before; 1981 to 1990; 1991 to 2000; 2001 to 2011 and total.

Note(s):

Footnote 1

In 1986, the Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation (CMHC) and the provinces agreed to use the 30% threshold to measure affordability for the purposes of defining need for social housing. This agreement was reached during the development of the federal/provincial social housing programs.

Housing return to footnote 1 referrer

Footnote 2

The need for major repairs is based on the judgment of the respondent. Examples of major repairs provided to respondents included defective plumbing or electrical wiring, structural repairs to walls, floors or ceilings, etc.

Housing return to footnote 2 referrer

Footnote 3

Housing suitability and the National Occupancy Standard (NOS) were developed by Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation (CMHC) through consultations with provincial housing agencies.

Housing return to footnote 3 referrer

Related data

Related data

Data quality note:

Footnote DQF

Excludes National Household Survey data for one or more incompletely enumerated Indian reserves or Indian settlements.

Return to footnote ! referrer

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