2001 Census Topic-based tabulations

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Topic-based tabulation: Selected Cultural and Labour Force Characteristics (58), Age Groups (5A), Sex (3) and Visible Minority Groups (15) for Population 15 Years and Over, for Canada, Provinces, Territories and Census Metropolitan Areas, 2001 Census - 20% Sample Data

About this tabulation

General information

Catalogue number :97F0010XCB2001046
Release date :November 6, 2003
Topic :Ethnocultural Portrait of Canada
Data dimensions :

Note

Cautionary Notes: Occupation

Broad Occupational Category A - Management Occupations

Census data for occupation groups in Broad Occupational Category A - Management Occupations should be used with caution. Some coding errors were made in assigning the appropriate level of management, e.g., senior manager as opposed to middle manager, and in determining the appropriate area of specialization or activity, e.g., a manager of a health care program in a hospital as opposed to a government manager in health policy administration. Some non-management occupations have also been miscoded to management due to confusion over titles such as program manager, project manager, etc. Data users may wish to use data for management occupations in conjunction with other variables such as income, age and education.

A334 - Other Managers in Public Administration

Census data for A334 - Other Managers in Public Administration should be used with extreme caution due to a high level of coding error. Coding errors were made in assigning the appropriate management level, e.g., senior manager as opposed to middle manager, and in determining the appropriate area of specialization, e.g., managers in economic and social policy administration have been miscoded to this group. Some non-management occupations have also been miscoded to A334 due to confusion over titles such as program manager, project manager, etc.

E037 - Program Officers Unique to Government

Census data for E037 - Program Officers Unique to Government should be used with extreme caution due to a high level of coding error. Coding errors were made with respect to the appropriate area of specialization, e.g., economic and social policy researchers and officers have been miscoded to this group. As well, a number of vague responses such as 'civil servant' and 'fonctionnaire' were wrongly assigned this code.

G111 - Sales Representatives, Wholesale Trade (Non-Technical)

2001 Census data are showing an under-estimate of persons in G111 - Sales Representatives, Wholesale Trade (Non-Technical). A high number of vague responses have resulted in some of these occupations being miscoded to other sales occupations such as G211 - Retail Salespersons and Sales Clerks and A131 - Sales Marketing and Advertising Managers.

G121 - Technical Sales Specialists, Wholesale Trade

2001 Census data are showing an under-estimate of persons in G121 - Technical Sales Specialists, Wholesale Trade. A high number of vague responses have resulted in some of these occupations being miscoded to other sales occupations such as G211 - Retail Salespersons and Sales Clerks and A131 - Sales Marketing and Advertising Managers.

G982 - Ironing, Pressing and Finishing Occupations

2001 Census data are showing an over-estimate of persons in G982 - Ironing, Pressing and Finishing Occupations due to miscoding of some workers in pressing occupations in clothing manufacturing to this group. These responses should have been coded to J319 - Other Labourers in Processing, Manufacturing and Utilities. Data users may want to consider excluding persons in industry (NAICS) sub-sector 315 - Clothing Manufacturing from the estimates for G982.

H512 - Tailors, Dressmakers, Furriers and Milliners

2001 Census data are showing an over-estimate of persons in H512 - Tailors, Dressmakers, Furriers and Milliners due to miscoding of some responses of 'couturier' and 'seamstress' in clothing manufacturing to this group.

J111 - Central Control and Process Operators, Mineral and Metal Processing
J121 - Machine Operators, Mineral and Metal Processing

Data for J111 - Central Control and Process Operators, Mineral and Metal Processing and J121 - Machine Operators, Mineral and Metal Processing should be used with caution. There is some overlap of responses coded to these two groups as respondents do not always provide enough information to allow coders to distinguish between them.

J113 - Pulping Control Operators
J142 - Pulp Mill Machine Operators

Data for J113 - Pulping Control Operators and J142 - Pulp Mill Machine Operators should be used with caution. There is some overlap of responses coded to these two groups as respondents do not always provide enough information to allow coders to distinguish between them.

J114 - Papermaking and Coating Control Operators
J143 - Papermaking and Finishing Machine Operators

Data for J114 - Papermaking and Coating Control Operators and J143 - Papermaking and Finishing Machine Operators should be used with caution. There is some overlap of responses coded to these two groups as respondents do not always provide enough information to allow coders to distinguish between them.

J319 - Other Labourers in Processing, Manufacturing and Utilities

2001 Census data are showing an under-estimate of persons in J319 - Other Labourers in Processing, Manufacturing and Utilities due to miscoding of some workers in pressing occupations in clothing manufacturing to G982 - Ironing, Pressing and Finishing Occupations.

Special Note: Non-permanent Residents

In 1991, 1996 and 2001, the Census of Population enumerated both permanent and non-permanent residents of Canada. Non-permanent residents are persons who held a student or employment authorization, Minister's permit, or who were refugee claimants, at the time of the census. Family members living with these persons are also classified as non-permanent residents.

Prior to 1991, only permanent residents of Canada were included in the census. (The only exception to this occurred in 1941.) Non-permanent residents were considered foreign residents and were not enumerated.

Today in Canada, non-permanent residents make up a significant segment of the population, especially in several census metropolitan areas. Their presence can affect the demand for such government services as health care, schooling, employment programs and language training. The inclusion of non-permanent residents in the census facilitates comparisons with provincial and territorial statistics (marriages, divorces, births and deaths) which include this population. In addition, this inclusion of non-permanent residents brings Canadian practice closer to the UN recommendation that long-term residents (persons living in a country for one year or longer) be enumerated in the census.

According to the 1996 Census, there were 166,715 non-permanent residents in Canada, representing 0.6% of the total population. There were slightly more non-permanent residents in Canada at the time of the 2001 Census: 198,645 non-permanent residents, or 0.7% of the total population.

Total population counts, as well as counts for all variables, are affected by this change in the census universe. Users should be especially careful when comparing data from 1991, 1996 or 2001 with data from previous censuses in geographic areas where there is a concentration of non-permanent residents. Such areas include the major metropolitan areas in Ontario, Quebec and British Columbia.

Although every attempt has been made to enumerate non-permanent residents, factors such as language difficulties, the reluctance to complete a government form or to understand the need to participate may have affected the enumeration of this population.

For additional information, please refer to the 2001 Census Dictionary, Catalogue Number 92-378-XIE or 92-378-XPE.

Special Note: Nunavut (1)

Data from the 2001 Census are available for Nunavut, the new territory that came into effect on April 1, 1999.

Standard data products released only at the Canada/Province/Territory geographic levels will not contain data for Nunavut for the census years prior to 2001.

Standard data products released at the Census Metropolitan Area (CMA) and Census Agglomeration (CA) geographic levels will contain data for Nunavut for the 2001, 1996 and/or 1991 Censuses.

The 1996 and 1991 CMA/CA data have been adjusted to reflect as closely as possible the 2001 CMA/CA geographic boundaries. This has been done to facilitate data comparisons using the 2001 geographic boundaries.

For additional information, please refer to the 2001 Census Dictionary, Catalogue Number 92-378-XIE or 92-378-XPE.

Special Note: Population 15 Years and Over Who Worked Since 2000

Refers to those who have worked since January 1, 2000, regardless of whether or not they were in the labour force in the reference week. For additional information, please refer to the 2001 Census Dictionary, Catalogue Number 92-378-XIE or 92-378-XPE.

Special Note: Population Universe

The Population Universe of the 2001 Census includes the following groups:

- Canadian citizens (by birth or by naturalization) and landed immigrants with a usual place of residence in Canada;
- Canadian citizens (by birth or by naturalization) and landed immigrants who are abroad, either on a military base or attached to a diplomatic mission;
- Canadian citizens (by birth or by naturalization) and landed immigrants at sea or in port aboard merchant vessels under Canadian registry;
- persons with a usual place of residence in Canada who are claiming refugee status and members of their families living with them;
- persons with a usual place of residence in Canada who hold student authorizations (student visas or student permits) and members of their families living with them;
- persons with a usual place of residence in Canada who hold employment authorizations (or work permits) and members of their families living with them;
- persons with a usual place of residence in Canada who hold Minister's permits (including extensions) and members of their families living with them.

For census purposes, the last four groups in this list are referred to as 'non-permanent residents'. For further information, refer to the variable Immigration: Non-permanent Resident found in the 2001 Census Dictionary, Catalogue Number 92-378-XIE or 92-378-XPE.

Data table

Select data categories for this table


This table details selected cultural and labour force characteristics , age groups , sex and visible minority groups for population 15 years and over in CanadaFootnote 1
Selected Cultural and Labour Force Characteristics (58) Visible Minority Groups (15)
Total - Total population by visible minority groups Total visible minority population Chinese South Asian Black Filipino Latin American Southeast Asian Arab West Asian Korean Japanese Visible minority, n.i.e.Footnote 2 Multiple visible minoritiesFootnote 3 All othersFootnote 4
Total population 15 years and over who worked since January 1, 2000 by language used most often at workFootnote 5 16,961,080 2,144,325 538,970 500,925 345,360 195,755 124,810 105,260 90,645 56,790 50,280 40,525 58,345 36,670 14,816,755
English 12,933,340 1,791,440 412,685 459,760 285,575 187,830 89,795 79,800 60,465 50,475 41,670 35,585 54,925 32,880 11,141,905
French 3,415,100 115,620 7,240 3,775 46,205 770 19,680 12,895 19,485 1,760 885 315 1,600 1,000 3,299,480
Non-official language 239,340 151,105 97,555 20,630 1,090 2,335 6,560 7,045 2,085 2,165 6,100 3,695 470 1,375 88,240
English and French 271,660 34,840 2,210 4,090 10,925 1,450 3,810 2,875 6,245 1,250 225 85 1,000 680 236,820
English and non-official language 83,405 45,485 18,645 12,320 695 3,295 3,150 2,180 1,140 985 1,390 825 225 630 37,925
French and non-official language 5,990 2,350 230 55 495 0 790 260 400 35 0 20 40 15 3,645
English, French and non-official language 12,240 3,490 410 290 370 75 1,030 195 835 120 10 10 80 85 8,750
Total population 15 years and over by labour force activityFootnote 6 23,901,360 3,041,650 834,140 688,730 467,095 239,780 168,530 148,755 141,470 85,920 81,135 60,580 77,210 48,305 20,859,710
In the labour force 15,872,070 2,006,300 494,945 469,160 329,410 182,270 118,590 99,785 86,960 53,950 45,660 36,440 54,975 34,160 13,865,775
Employed 14,695,130 1,815,880 453,315 423,955 291,385 172,070 106,190 90,025 74,515 46,675 41,680 34,210 50,540 31,320 12,879,255
Unemployed 1,176,940 190,420 41,625 45,205 38,020 10,200 12,400 9,760 12,445 7,275 3,985 2,230 4,435 2,840 986,520
Not in the labour force 8,029,290 1,035,355 339,195 219,570 137,685 57,510 49,940 48,975 54,510 31,965 35,475 24,145 22,235 14,145 6,993,935
Participation rate 66.4 66.0 59.3 68.1 70.5 76.0 70.4 67.1 61.5 62.8 56.3 60.2 71.2 70.7 66.5
Employment rate 61.5 59.7 54.3 61.6 62.4 71.8 63.0 60.5 52.7 54.3 51.4 56.5 65.5 64.8 61.7
Unemployment rate 7.4 9.5 8.4 9.6 11.5 5.6 10.5 9.8 14.3 13.5 8.7 6.1 8.1 8.3 7.1
Total labour force 15 years and over by industry - 1997 North American Industry Classification SystemFootnote 7 15,872,070 2,006,295 494,945 469,160 329,405 182,265 118,590 99,780 86,960 53,950 45,665 36,440 54,975 34,160 13,865,770
Industry - Not applicableFootnote 8 295,505 68,480 15,535 14,475 14,000 2,615 4,595 3,680 5,785 3,300 1,605 565 1,365 965 227,025
All industriesFootnote 9 15,576,565 1,937,815 479,410 454,690 315,405 179,655 113,995 96,105 81,175 50,645 44,055 35,875 53,615 33,195 13,638,745
11 Agriculture, forestry, fishing and hunting 567,665 19,465 2,605 9,310 1,865 535 1,390 2,020 235 120 240 665 290 195 548,205
21 Mining and oil and gas extraction 169,970 5,955 1,675 1,335 650 585 405 340 295 125 95 265 110 85 164,010
22 Utilities 118,790 8,015 2,380 1,920 1,295 505 265 435 315 155 125 205 265 150 110,770
23 Construction 879,245 46,980 9,325 9,015 9,210 2,435 6,710 2,290 2,525 1,810 515 985 1,550 610 832,270
31-33 Manufacturing 2,174,290 372,775 82,270 100,695 52,395 36,325 25,305 33,285 11,180 6,645 3,365 3,605 11,265 6,435 1,801,510
41 Wholesale trade 686,530 91,305 27,885 21,270 12,655 6,965 4,725 3,495 3,670 2,215 1,815 2,200 2,885 1,520 595,225
44-45 Retail trade 1,754,890 220,160 50,590 52,020 31,815 16,280 11,645 8,980 13,715 8,825 11,350 3,790 7,160 3,985 1,534,730
48-49 Transportation and warehousing 774,220 88,660 13,025 31,370 18,100 5,930 4,535 2,215 4,580 2,765 1,020 1,300 2,585 1,245 685,560
51 Information and cultural industries 417,290 59,385 17,635 12,255 11,210 4,350 2,825 2,070 2,370 1,270 1,170 1,335 1,660 1,235 357,900
52 Finance and insurance 635,630 111,090 36,690 26,800 15,655 10,685 3,315 2,650 3,555 1,715 1,900 1,695 4,040 2,395 524,540
53 Real estate and rental and leasing 259,360 32,560 11,145 7,180 4,440 2,385 1,710 1,020 1,050 835 940 560 850 450 226,795
54 Professional, scientific and technical services 982,300 147,180 53,235 32,975 16,300 8,435 6,315 5,235 7,280 4,410 3,370 3,490 3,430 2,705 835,120
55 Management of companies and enterprises 15,320 2,245 815 520 230 180 85 50 65 45 25 70 80 75 13,080
56 Administrative and support, waste management and remediation services 605,915 94,615 13,295 24,965 21,170 7,575 11,050 3,275 3,685 1,995 1,405 2,035 2,840 1,325 511,295
61 Educational services 1,021,020 85,065 25,165 18,430 14,240 4,590 4,295 2,255 4,470 2,645 2,355 3,270 1,900 1,445 935,960
62 Health care and social assistance 1,511,355 181,120 33,015 33,800 45,195 32,970 9,300 5,525 5,100 3,735 2,235 2,805 4,660 2,780 1,330,240
71 Arts, entertainment and recreation 303,865 24,995 6,480 3,270 5,235 2,410 1,625 1,180 910 605 1,010 1,110 545 615 278,870
72 Accommodation and food services 1,046,045 187,890 58,485 35,725 23,220 16,915 10,060 11,200 9,270 6,335 7,155 3,565 3,045 2,925 858,155
81 Other services (except public administration) 748,400 96,310 19,095 17,235 15,395 15,535 5,700 6,315 4,390 3,305 3,230 1,405 2,820 1,890 652,090
91 Public administration 904,480 62,055 14,590 14,590 15,140 4,055 2,750 2,260 2,525 1,100 730 1,540 1,625 1,140 842,430
Total labour force 15 years and over by occupation - 2001 National Occupational Classification for StatisticsFootnote 10 15,872,075 2,006,300 494,945 469,160 329,405 182,265 118,590 99,780 86,955 53,950 45,660 36,440 54,975 34,160 13,865,775
Occupation - Not applicableFootnote 11 295,510 68,485 15,535 14,470 14,000 2,615 4,595 3,680 5,785 3,300 1,610 560 1,365 965 227,020
All occupationsFootnote 12 15,576,560 1,937,815 479,410 454,690 315,405 179,655 114,000 96,105 81,175 50,650 44,055 35,875 53,615 33,195 13,638,745
A Management occupations 1,620,900 180,775 56,730 41,285 17,865 8,330 6,540 6,075 12,110 6,700 11,860 4,945 5,330 3,005 1,440,130
B Business, finance and administration occupations 2,768,370 357,060 95,560 86,280 64,040 34,730 16,960 10,290 11,345 6,145 5,165 6,915 12,680 6,945 2,411,310
C Natural and applied sciences and related occupations 1,003,815 178,735 67,535 38,745 16,570 11,395 7,090 8,715 9,745 5,945 3,390 3,175 3,540 2,895 825,080
D Health occupations 812,200 112,300 22,370 20,065 27,080 20,685 4,070 4,055 3,595 2,315 1,840 2,005 2,665 1,565 699,900
E Occupations in social science, education, government service and religion 1,205,185 108,965 26,550 24,715 22,010 6,140 6,415 2,850 5,780 3,340 3,050 3,430 2,685 2,010 1,096,220
F Occupations in art, culture, recreation and sport 435,685 41,135 12,915 5,450 7,680 2,555 2,955 1,735 1,485 980 1,620 1,940 805 1,020 394,545
G Sales and service occupations 3,677,380 499,490 116,255 105,070 82,420 56,780 35,310 23,785 22,300 15,290 13,425 8,860 11,540 8,470 3,177,890
H Trades, transport and equipment operators and related occupations 2,294,620 197,875 29,740 55,395 39,295 14,160 16,610 12,910 9,200 6,135 1,830 2,470 7,105 3,040 2,096,740
I Occupations unique to primary industry 667,550 23,970 3,170 9,960 2,940 740 2,010 2,315 445 315 320 1,085 390 270 643,580
J Occupations unique to processing, manufacturing and utilities 1,090,860 237,510 48,600 67,740 35,510 24,135 16,035 23,380 5,160 3,480 1,550 1,060 6,880 3,980 853,350
Total experienced labour force 15 years and over by class of workerFootnote 13 15,576,565 1,937,815 479,410 454,690 315,410 179,655 113,995 96,105 81,170 50,645 44,055 35,875 53,610 33,195 13,638,750
Paid workers 14,260,930 1,806,300 438,630 428,420 300,650 174,615 107,065 90,050 73,275 45,225 33,820 32,565 50,925 31,060 12,454,630
Employees 13,654,445 1,733,330 413,935 409,030 295,795 172,960 104,700 87,420 68,230 41,795 28,995 30,880 49,520 30,070 11,921,115
Self-employed (incorporated) 606,485 72,970 24,695 19,390 4,850 1,655 2,360 2,630 5,050 3,425 4,825 1,690 1,410 985 533,515
Self-employed (unincorporated) 1,254,715 124,120 38,565 24,585 14,480 4,890 6,670 5,680 7,460 5,060 8,995 3,145 2,590 2,005 1,130,595
Unpaid family workers 60,915 7,400 2,220 1,685 275 145 265 375 435 365 1,240 160 100 125 53,520

Footnotes

Footnote 1

Excludes census data for one or more incompletely enumerated Indian reserves or Indian settlements.

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Footnote 2

Includes respondents who reported a write-in response classified as a visible minority such as 'Polynesian', 'Guyanese', 'Mauritian', etc.

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Footnote 3

Includes respondents who reported more than one visible minority group by checking two or more mark-in circles, e.g. 'Black' and 'South Asian'.

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Footnote 4

Includes respondents who reported 'Yes' to Question 18 (Aboriginal self-reporting) as well as respondents who were not considered to be members of a visible minority group.

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Footnote 5

Language of Work
Part A - Plain Language Definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed Definition
Refers to the language used most often at work by the individual at the time of the census. Other languages used at work on a regular basis are also collected.

Return to footnote 5 referrer

Footnote 6

Labour Force Activity (in Reference Week)
Refers to the labour market activity of the population 15 years of age and over in the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 15, 2001). Respondents were classified as either employed, or unemployed, or as not in the labour force. The labour force includes the employed and the unemployed.

Employed (in Reference Week)
Refers to persons 15 years of age and over, excluding institutional residents, who, during the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 15, 2001):
(a) did any work at all for pay or in self-employment or without pay in a family farm, business or professional practice;
(b) were absent from their job or business, with or without pay, for the entire week because of a vacation, an illness, a labour dispute at their place of work, or any other reasons.

Unemployed (in Reference Week)
Refers to persons 15 years of age and over, excluding institutional residents, who, during the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 15, 2001), were without paid work or without self-employment work and were available for work and either:
(a) had actively looked for paid work in the past four weeks; or
(b) were on temporary lay-off and expected to return to their job; or
(c) had definite arrangements to start a new job in four weeks or less.

Not in the Labour Force (in Reference Week)
Refers to persons 15 years of age and over, excluding institutional residents, who, in the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 15, 2001), were neither employed nor unemployed. It includes students, homemakers, retired workers, seasonal workers in an 'off' season who were not looking for work, and persons who could not work because of a long-term illness or disability.

Labour Force (in Reference Week)
Refers to persons who were either employed or unemployed during the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 15, 2001).

In past censuses, this was called 'Total Labour Force'.

Participation Rate (in Reference Week)
Refers to the labour force in the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 15, 2001), expressed as a percentage of the population 15 years of age and over excluding institutional residents.

The participation rate for a particular group (age, sex, marital status, geographic area, etc.) is the total labour force in that group, expressed as a percentage of the population 15 years of age and over, in that group.

Employment Rate (in Reference Week)
Refers to the number of persons employed in the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 15, 2001), expressed as a percentage of the total population 15 years of age and over excluding institutional residents.

The employment rate for a particular group (age, sex, marital status, geographic area, etc.) is the number employed in that group, expressed as a percentage of the population 15 years of age and over in that group.

In past censuses, this was called the Employment-population Ratio.

Unemployment Rate (in Reference Week)
Refers to the unemployed expressed as a percentage of the labour force in the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 15, 2001).

The unemployment rate for a particular group (age, sex, marital status, geographic area, etc.) is the unemployed in that group, expressed as a percentage of the labour force in that group, in the week prior to enumeration.

Note:

1. For information on the comparability of labour force activity data with those of previous censuses and with the Labour Force Survey, see Appendix E in the 2001 Census Dictionary, Catalogue Number 92-378-XIE or 92-378-XPE.

2. See the Dictionary of the 1971 Census terms (Catalogue No. 12-540) for differences between 1961 and 1971.

Return to footnote 6 referrer

Footnote 7

Industry (based on the 1997 North American Industry Classification System [NAICS])
Part A - Plain Language Definition
General nature of the business carried out in the establishment where the person worked. The 2001 Census data on industry (based on the 1997 NAICS) can be compared with data from Canada's NAFTA partners (United States and Mexico).
Part B - Detailed Definition
Refers to the general nature of the business carried out in the establishment where the person worked. If the person did not have a job during the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to enumeration (May 15, 2001), the data relate to the job of longest duration since January 1, 2000. Persons with two or more jobs were required to report the information for the job at which they worked the most hours.

The 2001 industry data are produced according to the 1997 NAICS. The NAICS provides enhanced industry comparability among the three North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) trading partners (Canada, United States and Mexico). This classification consists of a systematic and comprehensive arrangement of industries structured into 20 sectors, 99 subsectors and 300 industry groups. The criteria used to create these categories are similarity of input structures, labour skills or production processes used by the establishment. For further information on the classification, see North American Industry Classification System, Canada, 1997, Catalogue No. 12-501-XPE.

The variable 'Industry (based on the 1997 NAICS)' does not permit direct comparison to any previous census industry data. The 1980 Standard Industrial Classification should be used for comparisons between the 1986, 1991, 1996 and 2001 Censuses.

The 2001 industry data can be tabulated for a number of populations, among which the most frequently used are:
(a) the employed;
(b) the experienced labour force - persons who were either employed or unemployed in the reference week but who had worked since January 1, 2000;
(c) those who have worked since January 1, 2000, regardless of whether or not they were in the labour force in the reference week.

The remaining components of the labour force, unemployed persons who worked prior to January 1, 2000, or who never worked, are shown in the data under the category 'Industry - Not applicable'.

Coding of responses to the industry questions was done, where possible, using a pre-coded List of Establishments to ensure uniformity with the NAICS codes assigned to the same establishments by other Statistics Canada surveys.

Comparable industry information based on the 1997 NAICS is also available from the Labour Force Survey.

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Footnote 8

Unemployed persons 15 years and over who have never worked for pay or in self-employment or who had last worked prior to January 1, 2000.

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Footnote 9

Refers to the experienced labour force: persons who, during the week prior to Census Day, were employed or unemployed who worked for pay or in self-employment since January 1, 2000.

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Footnote 10

Occupation (based on the 2001 National Occupational Classification for Statistics [NOC-S 2001])
Part A - Plain Language Definition
Kind of work done by persons aged 15 and over. Occupation is based on the type of job the person holds and the description of his or her duties. The 2001 data on occupation are classified according to the 2001 National Occupational Classification for Statistics (NOC-S 2001). For comparisons with data from the 1991 and 1996 Censuses, the variable Occupation (Historical) should be used.
Part B - Detailed Definition
Refers to the kind of work persons were doing during the reference week, as determined by their kind of work and the description of the main activities in their job. If the person did not have a job during the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to enumeration (May 15, 2001), the data relate to the job of longest duration since January 1, 2000. Persons with two or more jobs were to report the information for the job at which they worked the most hours.

The 2001 occupation data are classified according to the 2001 National Occupational Classification for Statistics (NOC-S 2001). This classification is composed of four levels of aggregation. There are 10 broad occupational categories containing 47 major groups that are further subdivided into 140 minor groups. At the most detailed level, there are 520 occupation unit groups. Occupation unit groups are formed on the basis of the education, training, or skill level required to enter the job, as well as the kind of work performed, as determined by the tasks, duties and responsibilities of the occupation.

The 2001 National Occupational Classification for Statistics is a revision of the 1991 Standard Occupational Classification (SOC). The 1991 SOC was used to classify occupation data in the 1991 and 1996 Censuses. In order to compare occupation data coded to the NOC-S 2001 with data coded to the 1991 SOC, the variable Occupation (Historical) should be used.

The 2001 occupation data can be tabulated for a number of populations, among which the most frequently used are:

(a) the employed;
(b) the experienced labour force - persons who were either employed or unemployed in the reference week but who had worked since January 1, 2000;
(c) those who have worked since January 1, 2000, regardless of whether or not they were in the labour force in the reference week.
The remaining components of the labour force, unemployed persons who worked prior to January 1, 2000, or who never worked, are shown in the data under the category 'Occupation - Not applicable'.

If the respondent did not specify an occupation or did not define it in sufficient detail to permit coding, a computer-generated NOC-S 2001 code was assigned based on other economic and demographic information given by the respondent.

Human Resources Development Canada classifies occupation data according to the National Occupational Classification (NOC). This classification has a similar structure to that of the 2001 National Occupational Classification for Statistics (NOC-S 2001). The two classifications have 520 unit groups, 140 minor groups and 10 broad categories in common. However, there are 47 major groups in the NOC-S 2001 and 26 major groups in the NOC. Occupation data from the 2001 Census are available according to both the NOC-S 2001and the NOC structures.

Occupation information is also available from the Labour Force Survey.

For information on the NOC-S 2001, see the National Occupational Classification for Statistics, 2001, Catalogue No. 12-583-XPE.

Return to footnote 10 referrer

Footnote 11

Unemployed persons 15 years and over who have never worked for pay or in self-employment or who had last worked prior to January 1, 2000.

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Footnote 12

Refers to the experienced labour force: persons who were employed or unemployed, who worked for pay or in self-employment since January 1, 2000.

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Footnote 13

Class of Worker
Part A - Plain Language Definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed Definition
This variable classifies persons who reported a job into the following categories:
(a) persons who worked mainly for wages, salaries, commissions, tips, piece-rates, or payments 'in kind' (payments in goods or services rather than money);
(b) persons who worked mainly for themselves, with or without paid help, operating a business, farm or professional practice, alone or in partnership;
(c) persons who worked without pay in a family business, farm or professional practice owned or operated by a related household member; unpaid family work does not include unpaid housework, unpaid childcare, unpaid care to seniors and volunteer work.
The job reported was the one held in the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to enumeration (May 15, 2001) if the person was employed, or the job of longest duration since January 1, 2000, if the person was not employed during the reference week. Persons with two or more jobs in the reference week were asked to provide information for the job at which they worked the most hours.

Wage and Salary Earners
Includes persons 15 years of age and over who worked since January 1, 2000, and who indicated that in the job reported, they were working mainly for wages, salaries, commissions, tips, piece-rates or payments 'in kind' (payments in goods or services rather than money). Some examples include: those who worked in someone else's private household at such jobs as babysitting and cleaning; salespersons on commission working for only one company and not maintaining an office or staff; and those who worked for payment 'in kind' in non-family enterprises, such as members of a religious order who received free room and board or other supplies in lieu of cash.

Self-employed
Includes persons 15 years of age and over who worked since January 1, 2000, and for whom the job reported consisted mainly of operating a business, farm or professional practice, alone or in partnership. Some examples include: operating a farm, whether the land is rented or owned; working on a freelance or contract basis to do a job (e.g. architects, private duty nurses); operating a direct distributorship selling and delivering products such as cosmetics, newspapers, brushes and soap products; and fishing with own equipment or with equipment in which the person has a share.
Respondents were to specify if their business was incorporated or unincorporated, as well as if they had paid help or no paid help. It should be noted that new tax laws in 1980 permitted the respondent, for the first time, to deduct a spouse's wages as expenses. Consequently, self-employed persons who decided to pay wages to their spouse to take advantage of the new law changed status from 'without paid help' to 'with paid help' between 1971 and 1981. This change should be kept in mind when comparing data between the 1971 Census and subsequent censuses.

Unpaid Family Workers (Worked Without Pay for a Relative in a Family Business, Farm or Professional Practice)
Includes persons 15 years of age and over who worked without regular money wages, for a relative who was a member of the same household. The job reported consisted mainly of tasks contributing to the operation of a business, farm or professional practice, owned or operated by the relative.
Census data are directly comparable for this category from 1981 to 2001. The 1971 Census may not be strictly comparable to subsequent censuses because of conceptual changes in the 1981 Census. For instance, females who were unpaid family workers, worked as farm labourers, and did less than 20 hours of unpaid work a week, were excluded from the labour force according to the 1971 definitions. These persons are included in the employed labour force in 1981, 1986, 1991, 1996 and 2001. Also, new tax laws, mentioned earlier, changed the status of some people from 'unpaid family workers' to 'paid workers' between 1971 and 1981.
In addition, there were some data quality problems with the 1981 data that led to the underestimation of the 'Unpaid family workers'. In 1986, an apparent dramatic increase from 1981 in this category of worker was due more to better reporting in 1986 than an actual increase in the number of unpaid family workers.

Census products
Census products often present the class of worker data in the following categories:
(a) paid workers: this includes wage and salary earners and self-employed persons in incorporated companies (the latter are included because they are considered employees of their own companies and thus, paid workers);
(b) self-employed in unincorporated companies (a breakdown of 'with paid help' and 'without paid help' can be provided);
(c) unpaid family workers.

Comparability between Census Data and the Labour Force Survey data
Some persons who are considered as paid workers in the census are considered as self-employed persons without a business in the Labour Force Survey. These are persons who work at jobs such as babysitting and cleaning for private households, or as newspaper carriers.

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Source: Statistics Canada, 2001 Census of Population, Statistics Canada Catalogue no. 97F0010XCB2001046.

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