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Figure 3 Rate of English–French bilingualism among Anglophones by age groups, Canada less Quebec, 1996 to 2006

Figure 3 Rate of English–French bilingualism among Anglophones by age groups, Canada less Quebec, 1996 to 2006

Sources: Statistics Canada, censuses of population, 1996 to 2006.

Description

This graphic presents the rate of EnglishFrench bilingualism among Anglophones living in Canada, excluding Quebec, by age groups. Three censuses are shown, those of 1996, 2001 and 2006. Young Anglophones between 10 and 24 years of age are the most bilingual. This is true for the three censuses. The rate of bilingualism decreased between 1996 and 2001 for these age groups. This is true for the same age group for each of the three censuses (speaking of the decrease) as well as for the same cohort (speaking of erosion as the same persons found five years later and five years older are not as bilingual as in the previous census).

Among those aged 5 to 9 years, 5.8% knew both official languages in 1996, 6.0% in 2001 and 7.2% in 2006. For the group aged 10 to 14 years, 12.9% were bilingual in 1996, 11.5% in 2001 and 12.0% in 2006. Youth aged between 15 and 19 years reported bilingualism at 16.3% in 1996, 14.7% in 2001 and 13.0% in 2006. For those aged 20 to 24 years, 12.3% knew both official languages in 1996, 13.5% in 2001 and 12.2% in 2006. For those aged 25 to 29 years, 8.3% declared themselves bilingual in 1996, 10.5% in 2001 and 11.8% in 2006. For the group aged 30 to 34, there were 6.0% bilingual in 1996, 7.6% in 2001 and 9.8% in 2006. Among those aged 35 to 39 years, 5.4% of individuals were bilingual in 1996, 5.9% in 2001 and 7.5% in 2006. In the group of those aged 40 to 44, there were 5.8% bilingual in 1996, 5.4% in 2001 and 5.9% in 2006. Among those aged 45 to 49 years, 6.1% knew both official languages in 1996, 5.6% in 2001 and 5.2% in 2006. For those persons aged 50 to 54 years, 5.2% were bilingual in 1996, 5.7% in 2001 and 5.5% in 2006. For the group aged 55 to 59 years, there were 4.0% bilingual in 1996, 4.9% in 2001 and 5.5% in 2006. Among those aged 60 to 64 years, 3.3% knew both official languages in 1996, 3.8% in 2001 and 4.8% in 2006. Persons aged between 65 to 69 years had a rate of bilingualism of 2.9% in 1996, 3.2% in 2001 and 3.7% in 2006. For the group of 70 to 74 years of age, 2.5% declared themselves bilingual in 1996, 2.8% in 2001 and 3.3% in 2006. Among persons between 75 and 79 years old, 2.2% knew both official languages in 1996, 2.4% in 2001 and 2.9% in 2006. Finally, in the last age group, those persons aged 80 years and over, 1.9% were bilingual in 1996, 2.2% in 2001 and 2.4% in 2006.

Sources: Statistics Canada, censuses of population, 1996 to 2006.