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2006 Community Profiles

Definitions and symbols


Definitions:

1. 2006 and 2001 population based on 100% data

Statistics Canada is taking additional measures to protect the privacy of all Canadians and the confidentiality of the data they provide to us. Starting with the 2001 Census, some population counts are adjusted in order to ensure confidentiality.

1. 2006 and 2001 population based on 100% data

Statistics Canada is taking additional measures to protect the privacy of all Canadians and the confidentiality of the data they provide to us. Starting with the 2001 Census, some population counts are adjusted in order to ensure confidentiality.

2. Total private dwellings

For the 2006 Census, a private dwelling is defined as: A set of living quarters designed for or converted for human habitation in which a person or group of persons reside or could reside. In addition, a private dwelling must have a source of heat or power and must be an enclosed space that provides shelter from the elements, as evidenced by complete and enclosed walls and roof and by doors and windows that provide protection from wind, rain and snow.
Private dwellings

3. Private dwellings occupied by usual residents

A separate set of living quarters which has a private entrance either directly from outside or from a common hall, lobby, vestibule or stairway leading to the outside, and in which a person or a group of persons live permanently.
Private dwellings occupied by usual residents

25. Household characteristics - 20% sample data

Private household refers to a person or a group of persons (other than foreign residents) who occupy the same dwelling and do not have a usual place of residence elsewhere in Canada. It may consist of a family group (census family) with or without other persons, of two or more families sharing a dwelling, of a group of unrelated persons, or of one person living alone. Household members who are temporarily absent on Census Day (e.g., temporary residents elsewhere) are considered as part of their usual household. For census purposes, every person is a member of one and only one household. Unless otherwise specified, all data in household reports are for private households only.

26. Households containing a couple (married or common-law) with children

Refers to one-family households containing a couple (with or without persons not in census families) with at least one child under 25 years of age.

26. Median income in 2005 - Couple households with children ($)

Refers to one-family households containing a couple (with or without persons not in census families) with at least one child under 25 years of age.

26. Median after-tax income in 2005 - Couple households with children ($)

Refers to one-family households containing a couple (with or without persons not in census families) with at least one child under 25 years of age.

27. Median after-tax income in 2005 - Couple households without children ($)

Includes one-family households containing a couple (with or without persons not in census families) with all children 25 years of age and over.

27. Median income in 2005 - Couple households without children ($)

Includes one-family households containing a couple (with or without persons not in census families) with all children 25 years of age and over.

27. Households containing a couple (married or common-law) without children

Includes one-family households containing a couple (with or without persons not in census families) with all children 25 years of age and over.

28. Other household types

Includes multiple-family households, lone-parent family households and non-family households other than one-person households.

28. Median income in 2005 - Other household types ($)

Includes multiple-family households, lone-parent family households and non-family households other than one-person households.

28. Median after-tax income in 2005 - Other household types ($)

Includes multiple-family households, lone-parent family households and non-family households other than one-person households.

29. Median after-tax income in 2005 - All private households ($)

Household total income - The total income of a household is the sum of the total incomes of all members of that household.

Total income refers to the total money income received from the following sources during calendar year 2005 by persons 15 years of age and over:

  • wages and salaries (total)
  • net farm income
  • net non-farm income from unincorporated business and/or professional practice
  • child benefits
  • Old Age Security pension and Guaranteed Income Supplement
  • benefits from Canada or Quebec Pension Plan
  • benefits from Employment Insurance
  • other income from government sources
  • dividends, interest on bonds, deposits and savings certificates, and other investment income
  • retirement pensions, superannuation and annuities, including those from RRSPs and RRIFs
  • other money income.

After-tax income of households - The after-tax income of a household is the sum of the after-tax incomes of all members of that household. After-tax income refers to total income from all sources minus federal, provincial and territorial taxes paid for 2005.

Receipts not counted as income - The income concept excludes gambling gains and losses, lottery prizes, money inherited during the year in a lump sum, capital gains or losses, receipts from the sale of property, income tax refunds, loan payments received, lump-sum settlements of insurance policies, rebates received on property taxes, refunds of pension contributions as well as all income 'in kind', such as free meals and living accommodations, or agricultural products produced and consumed on the farm.

Median income of households - The median income of a specified group of households is that amount which divides their income size distribution, ranked by size of income, into two halves. That is, the incomes of the first half of households are below the median, while those of the second half are above the median. Median incomes of households are normally calculated for all units in the specified group, whether or not they reported income.

The above concept and procedure also apply in the calculation of median after-tax income of households.

Private household refers to a person or a group of persons (other than foreign residents) who occupy the same dwelling and do not have a usual place of residence elsewhere in Canada. It may consist of a family group (census family) with or without other persons, of two or more families sharing a dwelling, of a group of unrelated persons, or of one person living alone. Household members who are temporarily absent on Census Day (e.g., temporary residents elsewhere) are considered as part of their usual household. For census purposes, every person is a member of one and only one household. Unless otherwise specified, all data in household reports are for private households only.

29. Median income in 2005 - All private households ($)

Household total income - The total income of a household is the sum of the total incomes of all members of that household.

Total income refers to the total money income received from the following sources during calendar year 2005 by persons 15 years of age and over:

  • wages and salaries (total)
  • net farm income
  • net non-farm income from unincorporated business and/or professional practice
  • child benefits
  • Old Age Security pension and Guaranteed Income Supplement
  • benefits from Canada or Quebec Pension Plan
  • benefits from Employment Insurance
  • other income from government sources
  • dividends, interest on bonds, deposits and savings certificates, and other investment income
  • retirement pensions, superannuation and annuities, including those from RRSPs and RRIFs
  • other money income.

After-tax income of households - The after-tax income of a household is the sum of the after-tax incomes of all members of that household. After-tax income refers to total income from all sources minus federal, provincial and territorial taxes paid for 2005.

Receipts not counted as income - The income concept excludes gambling gains and losses, lottery prizes, money inherited during the year in a lump sum, capital gains or losses, receipts from the sale of property, income tax refunds, loan payments received, lump-sum settlements of insurance policies, rebates received on property taxes, refunds of pension contributions as well as all income 'in kind', such as free meals and living accommodations, or agricultural products produced and consumed on the farm.

Median income of households - The median income of a specified group of households is that amount which divides their income size distribution, ranked by size of income, into two halves. That is, the incomes of the first half of households are below the median, while those of the second half are above the median. Median incomes of households are normally calculated for all units in the specified group, whether or not they reported income.

The above concept and procedure also apply in the calculation of median after-tax income of households.

Private household refers to a person or a group of persons (other than foreign residents) who occupy the same dwelling and do not have a usual place of residence elsewhere in Canada. It may consist of a family group (census family) with or without other persons, of two or more families sharing a dwelling, of a group of unrelated persons, or of one person living alone. Household members who are temporarily absent on Census Day (e.g., temporary residents elsewhere) are considered as part of their usual household. For census purposes, every person is a member of one and only one household. Unless otherwise specified, all data in household reports are for private households only.

30. Median monthly payments for rented dwellings ($)

Includes the monthly rent and costs of electricity, heat and municipal services paid by tenant households.

31. Median monthly payments for owner-occupied dwellings ($)

Includes all shelter expenses paid by households that own their dwellings.

32. Mother tongue - 20% sample data

Refers to the first language learned at home in childhood and still understood by the individual at the time of the census.

33. Other language(s)

Includes responses indicating single responses of a non-official language and multiple responses. Multiple responses include cases where one non-official language is in combination either with English or French or with both official languages.

Symbols:

A adjusted figure due to boundary change

Users wishing to compare 2006 Census data with those of other censuses should then take into account that the boundaries of geographic areas may change from one census to another. In order to facilitate comparison, the 2001 Census counts are adjusted, as needed, to take into account boundary changes between the 2001 and 2006 censuses. The 2001 counts that were adjusted are identified by the letter 'A'. The letter 'A' may also refer to corrections to the 2001 counts; however, most of these are the result of boundary changes. This symbol is also used to identify areas that have been created since 2001, such as newly incorporated municipalities (census subdivisions).

E use with caution

After the release of the 2001 or 2006 Census population and dwelling counts, errors are occasionally uncovered in the data. It is not possible to make changes to the 2001 or 2006 Census data presented in these tables.

Refer to the 2001 population and dwelling count amendments or the 2006 population and dwelling count amendments for further information.

X area and data suppression

In addition to random rounding, area and data suppression has been adopted to further protect the confidentiality of individual respondents' personal information.

Area and data suppression results in the deletion of all information for geographic areas with populations below a specified size. For example, areas with a population of less than 40 persons are suppressed. If the community searched has a population of less than 40 persons, only the total population counts will be available.

Whenever income data are shown, those areas with populations below 250 persons, or where the number of private households is less than 40, income data are suppressed. If a community searched has less than 250 persons, or if the number of private households is less than 40, the income data will not be available. All suppressed cells and associated averages, medians and standard errors of average income have been replaced with zeros. In all cases, suppressed data are included in the appropriate higher-level aggregate subtotals and totals.

Persons living on Indian reserves and Indian settlements who were enumerated with the 2006 Census Form 2D questionnaire were not asked the questions on citizenship and immigration. Consequently, data are suppressed for Indian reserves and Indian settlements at the census subdivision level. These data are, however, included in the totals for larger geographic areas such as provinces and territories.

To view the extent to which data are suppressed, see 'suppression criteria'.

 excludes census data for one or more incompletely enumerated Indian reserves or Indian settlements

Excludes census data for one or more incompletely enumerated Indian reserves or Indian settlements (For further information, see the 'Notes'.)

 incompletely enumerated Indian Reserve or Indian settlement (For further information, see the 'Notes'.)

Due to incompletely enumerated Indian reserves and Indian settlements, data are not available for either the 2006 Census, the 2001 Census or for both the 2001 and 2006 censuses.

Refer to a complete list of these geographic areas.

... not applicable

The possible reasons for the use of the three dots (ยทยทยท) symbol are:

  • A value that cannot be calculated such as a percentage change where the denominator is zero;
  • A figure is deemed inappropriate for areas that had a population and/or dwelling count amendment in 2001.

Refer to the 2001 population and dwelling count amendments for further information.


Source: Statistics Canada, 2006 Census of Population.

How to cite: Statistics Canada. 2007. Atholville, New Brunswick (Code1314013) (table). 2006 Community Profiles. 2006 Census. Statistics Canada Catalogue no. 92-591-XWE. Ottawa. Released March 13, 2007.
https://www12.statcan.gc.ca/census-recensement/2006/dp-pd/prof/92-591/index.cfm?Lang=E
(accessed May 15, 2021).