2006 Census Topic-based tabulations

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Topic-based tabulation: Occupation - National Occupational Classification for Statistics 2006 (720C), Sex (3) and Selected Demographic, Cultural, Labour Force, Educational and Income Characteristics (273) for the Population 15 Years and Over of Canada, Provinces, Territories, Census Metropolitan Areas and Census Agglomerations, 2006 Census - 20% Sample Data

About this tabulation

General information

Catalogue number:97-564-XCB2006005
Release date:December 9, 2008
Topic:Labour
Data dimensions:

Note

Additional information about this table is available in the Dimension Summary Box of the 'Selected demographic, cultural, labour force, educational and income characteristics (273)' variable.

Note: Data Quality - Relationship of Census Income Estimates to the National Accounts and Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics

Census income estimates of aggregate income in 2005 were compared to similar personal income estimates from the national accounts. After adjustments to the personal income estimates for differences in concepts and coverage, the census estimate of aggregate income in 2005 from comparable sources was 1.2% lower than the national accounts estimate. As in the past, census estimates for some income components and for some provinces compared more favourably than for others.

Census estimates of aggregate wages and salaries, the largest component of income, were slightly higher (1.0%) than the national accounts estimates. This was partially offset by the difference (-7.8%) between the census estimates of aggregate self-employment income from both farm and non-farm self-employment and the adjusted national accounts figures. Overall, estimates of aggregate employment income or earnings were nearly identical (0.3% difference).

Census estimates of Old Age Security pensions and the Guaranteed Income Supplement were slightly lower (-1.4%), as they were for Canada/Quebec Pension Plan benefits (-0.9%), than adjusted national accounts estimates. Employment Insurance benefits reported in the census were smaller by 6.1%. Census estimates of aggregate child benefits were 2.0% higher than the adjusted national accounts estimates. Census estimates of other government transfer payments, which include such items as social welfare benefits, provincial income supplements to seniors, veterans' pensions and GST/HST/QST refunds, were significantly below (-39.2%) the estimates from the national accounts. Overall, census estimates of aggregate income from all government transfer payments were lower by 12.0%. The census estimate of aggregate investment income in 2005 was slightly lower (-2.7%) than the comparable national accounts estimate. This is a significant improvement when compared to previous census comparisons.

Census income statistics were also compared with similar statistics from the annual Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics (SLID). SLID estimates reflect adjustments made for population undercoverage, while census estimates do not include such an adjustment. This adjustment contributes to census estimates showing fewer income recipients (-2.1%) and earners (-1.4%) than SLID estimates. However, due to higher average amounts, census estimates of aggregate earnings are 2.8% higher than the SLID estimate, while the census estimate of aggregate total income of individuals is 2.3% higher. Most of the observed provincial differences were considered acceptable in the light of sampling errors in the Survey. The all-person low income prevalence rates for Canada (excluding the Territories) were almost identical in both sources for the before-tax measure at 15.3% and only slightly higher (0.6 percentage points) in census than SLID for the after-tax rate.

Note: Broad occupational category A - Management occupations

Census data for occupation groups in Broad occupational category A - Management occupations should be used with caution. Some coding errors were made in assigning the appropriate level of management, e.g., senior manager as opposed to middle manager, and in determining the appropriate area of specialization or activity, e.g., a manager of a health care program in a hospital as opposed to a government manager in health policy administration. Some non-management occupations have also been miscoded to management due to confusion over titles such as program manager and project manager. Data users may wish to use data for management occupations in conjunction with other variables such as Income, Age and Education.

Note: Comparability of 2006 Place of work data

Working at home can be measured in different ways. In the census, the 'Worked at home' category includes persons who live and work at the same physical location, such as farmers, teleworkers and work camp workers. In addition, the 2006 Census Guide instructed persons who worked part of the time at home and part of the time at an employer's address to indicate that they 'Worked at home' if most of their time was spent working at home (e.g., three days out of five).

Other Statistics Canada surveys such as the General Social Survey, the Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics, and the Workplace and Employee Survey also collect information on working at home. However, the survey data are not directly comparable to the census data since the surveys ask respondents whether they did some or all of their paid work at home, whereas the census asks them where they usually worked most of the time. Consequently, census estimates on work at home are lower than survey estimates.

The place-of-work question has remained in virtually the same format in each census since 1971. However, in 1996, the category 'No fixed workplace address' replaced 'No usual place of work.' In 1996, the census questionnaire was modified by adding a check box for the 'No fixed workplace' response category. In previous censuses, respondents were asked to write 'No usual place of work' in the address fields. It is believed that previous censuses have undercounted the number of persons with 'No fixed workplace address.'

Annexations, incorporations and amalgamations of municipalities could create some difficulties when comparing spatial units and structures which change over time.

For additional information, please refer to the 2006 Census Dictionary, Catalogue number 92-566-XWE.

Note: Consistency of earnings and labour estimates

Changes to the collection methodology for income data and to the editing procedures create an apparent inconsistency for more records in 2006 compared to 2001. For example, a larger amount of full-year, full-time workers (or part-year workers) are without reported earnings. There are also more persons with earnings that do not report work activity during the previous calendar year.

These impacts are also visible for wages and salaries and net income from self-employment.

For more information, please consult the Income and Earnings Reference Guide, 2006 Census, Catalogue no. 97-563-GWE2006003.

Note: Definition of Place of work status

Refers to the place of work of non-institutional residents 15 years of age and over who worked at some time since January 1, 2005. The variable usually relates to the individual's job held in the week prior to enumeration. However, if the person did not work during that week but had worked at some time since January 1, 2005, the information relates to the job held longest during that period.

Respondent-completed responses:

Worked at home - Persons whose job is located in the same building as their place of residence, persons who live and work on the same farm, building superintendents and teleworkers who spend most of their work week working at home.

Worked outside Canada - Persons who work at a location outside Canada. This can include diplomats, Armed Forces personnel and other persons enumerated abroad. This category also includes recent immigrants who may not currently be employed, but whose job of longest duration since January 1, 2005 was held outside Canada.

No fixed workplace address - Persons who do not go from home to the same workplace location at the beginning of each shift. Such persons include building and landscape contractors, travelling salespersons, independent truck drivers, etc.

Worked at the address specified below - Persons who are not included in the categories described above and who report to the same (usual) workplace location at the beginning of each shift are included here. Respondents are asked to provide the street address, city, town, village, township, municipality or Indian reserve, province or territory and postal code of their workplace. If the full street address was not known, the name of the building or nearest street intersection could be substituted.

Teleworkers who spend less than one-half of their workweek working at their home office are asked to report the full address of their employer. Persons whose workplace location varied, but who reported regularly to an employer's address at the beginning of each shift, are asked to report the full address of the employer.

For additional information, please refer to the 2006 Census Dictionary, Catalogue number 92-566-XWE.

Note: Income Data for Seniors in Collective Dwellings

In the 2006 Census, individuals who resided in institutions or residences with distinct, separate living quarters, and who were able to complete the census questionnaire, received their own census form to complete. These individuals were excluded from measurements of income in prior censuses. This census their incomes have been set to zero. This results in a slight overestimation in the count of population 15 years and over, and primarily the age group 65 years and over, without income (or without earnings). Counts and income statistics for families or persons not in families are not affected, as individuals in these types of collective dwellings have always, and continue to be excluded from those populations.

Note: Income suppression

Area suppression is the deletion of all characteristic data for geographic areas with populations below a specified size. Income distributions and related statistics are suppressed if the population in the area, excluding institutional residents, is less than 250 from either the 100% or the 20% database, or if the number of private households is less than 40 from the 20% database.

Tables with income, after-tax income or earnings distributions

Income, after-tax income and earnings distributions have been suppressed where the estimated total number of units (persons, families or households) in the reference year is less than 250. All suppressed cells and associated averages, medians and standard errors of average income, average after-tax income or average earnings have been replaced with zeroes or symbols.

In all cases, suppressed data are included in the appropriate higher aggregate subtotals and totals.

Tables with number and median or average income, after-tax income or earnings

Statistics have been suppressed if the estimated total number of persons (males, females or both sexes) with income, after-tax income or earnings in the reference year is less than 250 persons. All suppressed counts and associated averages and medians have been replaced by zeroes or symbols.

In all cases, suppressed data are included in the appropriate higher aggregate subtotals and totals.

Note: Institutional residents

People in seniors' residences in the 2006 Census are classified as 'not living in an institution'. This is a change from the 2001 Census where they were classified as institutional residents, specifically, 'living in an institution, resident under care or custody'.

Note: Labour force growth for the Northwest Territories

Care should be exercised in comparing the Northwest Territories 2006 Census population counts with those from the 2001 Census. In 2001, the net undercount for the Northwest Territories was estimated at 8.11%, substantially higher than the national level of 2.99%, and almost double its 1996 level. The increase in the labour force, the employed, unemployed and not in the labour force populations between 2001 and 2006 is likely overstated due to improvements in coverage of the Northwest Territories in 2006.

Data table

Select data categories for this table


This table details occupation - national occupational classification for statistics 2006 , sex and selected demographic, cultural, labour force, educational and income characteristics for the population 15 years and over in CanadaFootnote 1
Selected demographic, cultural, labour force, educational and income characteristics (273) Sex (3)
Total - Sex Male Female
Total labour force by age groupsFootnote 2 17,146,135 9,020,595 8,125,540
15 to 24 years 2,757,975 1,407,685 1,350,290
15 to 19 years 1,090,885 550,620 540,270
20 to 24 years 1,667,090 857,070 810,020
25 to 34 years 3,416,605 1,772,755 1,643,850
35 to 44 years 4,158,050 2,153,290 2,004,755
45 to 54 years 4,190,910 2,168,250 2,022,660
55 to 64 years 2,179,360 1,224,840 954,515
65 to 74 years 361,740 238,340 123,400
75 years and over 81,505 55,440 26,065
Total labour force by mobility status 1 year agoFootnote 3 17,142,435 9,018,325 8,124,115
Non-movers 14,482,335 7,627,815 6,854,520
Movers 2,660,100 1,390,505 1,269,595
Non-migrants 1,574,385 817,150 757,230
Migrants 1,085,720 573,360 512,360
Internal migrants 942,340 495,780 446,565
Intraprovincial migrants 757,425 394,085 363,340
Interprovincial migrants 184,915 101,690 83,225
External migrants 143,380 77,580 65,795
Total labour force by mobility status 5 years agoFootnote 4 17,142,435 9,018,325 8,124,115
Non-movers 9,515,465 5,039,730 4,475,735
Movers 7,626,970 3,978,590 3,648,385
Non-migrants 4,133,945 2,142,270 1,991,670
Migrants 3,493,030 1,836,320 1,656,705
Internal migrants 2,858,035 1,492,180 1,365,855
Intraprovincial migrants 2,295,235 1,190,965 1,104,270
Interprovincial migrants 562,800 301,215 261,585
External migrants 634,990 344,140 290,855
Total labour force by mother tongueFootnote 5 17,146,135 9,020,595 8,125,540
English 9,920,060 5,206,685 4,713,370
French 3,745,825 1,962,900 1,782,920
Non-official language 3,283,170 1,749,610 1,533,560
English and French 45,885 22,895 22,985
English and non-official language 123,955 63,745 60,205
French and non-official language 22,345 12,115 10,235
English, French and non-official language 4,900 2,635 2,260
Total experienced labour force by language used most often at workFootnote 6 16,861,185 8,884,810 7,976,370
English 12,868,085 6,801,195 6,066,890
French 3,434,310 1,792,025 1,642,280
Non-official language 232,295 122,815 109,480
English and French 233,260 120,245 113,015
English and non-official language 78,680 40,820 37,855
French and non-official language 4,450 2,225 2,225
English, French and non-official language 10,100 5,480 4,620
Total labour force by immigrant status and period of immigrationFootnote 7 17,146,135 9,020,595 8,125,540
Non-immigrantsFootnote 8 13,386,295 7,019,290 6,367,010
ImmigrantsFootnote 9 3,634,845 1,931,465 1,703,385
Before 1991 1,949,270 1,048,160 901,110
1991 to 2000 1,089,565 564,610 524,955
1991 to 1995 559,415 284,855 274,555
1996 to 2000 530,150 279,750 250,400
2001 to 2006Footnote 10 596,010 318,690 277,320
Non-permanent residentsFootnote 11 124,990 69,840 55,150
Total labour force by visible minority groupsFootnote 12 17,146,135 9,020,595 8,125,540
Total visible minority populationFootnote 13 2,639,520 1,374,015 1,265,510
Chinese 623,225 319,410 303,815
South AsianFootnote 14 656,200 366,825 289,380
Black 397,460 196,370 201,090
Filipino 245,850 101,295 144,560
Latin American 175,570 93,495 82,075
Southeast AsianFootnote 15 127,150 65,370 61,775
Arab 125,365 79,420 45,950
West AsianFootnote 16 80,725 46,870 33,855
Korean 62,820 33,020 29,800
Japanese 40,890 19,605 21,290
Visible minority, n.i.e.Footnote 17 40,625 20,420 20,205
Multiple visible minorityFootnote 18 63,635 31,920 31,715
Not a visible minorityFootnote 19 14,506,615 7,646,580 6,860,035
Total population 15 years and over by labour force activityFootnote 20 25,664,225 12,470,785 13,193,440
In the labour force 17,146,135 9,020,595 8,125,540
Employed 16,021,175 8,431,530 7,589,645
Unemployed 1,124,960 589,060 535,890
Not in the labour force 8,518,090 3,450,190 5,067,900
Total population 15 years and over by work activity in 2005Footnote 21 25,664,225 12,470,785 13,193,440
Did not work in 2005Footnote 22 7,805,645 3,127,680 4,677,965
Worked in 2005 17,858,575 9,343,110 8,515,475
1 to 13 weeks 1,278,880 598,265 680,615
14 to 26 weeks 1,697,795 817,045 880,750
27 to 39 weeks 1,272,240 639,925 632,310
40 to 48 weeks 2,606,820 1,349,125 1,257,695
49 to 52 weeks 11,002,855 5,938,750 5,064,095
Average weeks worked in 2005 43.2 43.8 42.5
Worked mostly full time in 2005 13,869,780 7,925,810 5,943,970
1 to 13 weeks 537,455 274,490 262,965
14 to 26 weeks 940,930 510,475 430,455
27 to 39 weeks 813,175 470,280 342,900
40 to 48 weeks 1,995,935 1,155,980 839,955
49 to 52 weeksFootnote 23 9,582,275 5,514,585 4,067,690
Average weeks worked mostly full time 45.8 46.0 45.5
Worked mostly part time in 2005 3,988,800 1,417,300 2,571,505
1 to 13 weeks 741,415 323,775 417,645
14 to 26 weeks 756,865 306,565 450,300
27 to 39 weeks 459,060 169,645 289,410
40 to 48 weeks 610,880 193,145 417,740
49 to 52 weeks 1,420,580 424,170 996,410
Average weeks worked mostly part time 34.0 31.2 35.5
Total labour force by class of workerFootnote 24 17,146,135 9,020,595 8,125,535
Class of worker - Not applicableFootnote 25 284,955 135,785 149,165
All classes of workerFootnote 26 16,861,185 8,884,810 7,976,375
Paid workers 15,535,410 8,081,435 7,453,975
Employees 14,816,205 7,558,530 7,257,675
Self-employed (incorporated) 719,210 522,905 196,305
Without paid help 291,390 206,435 84,960
With paid help 427,815 316,475 111,345
Self-employed (unincorporated) 1,274,505 787,230 487,275
Without paid help 900,620 529,560 371,055
With paid help 373,885 257,670 116,215
Unpaid family workers 51,265 16,140 35,125
Total employed labour force by hours worked in reference weekFootnote 27 16,021,175 8,431,530 7,589,645
No hours workedFootnote 28 711,205 299,770 411,435
Persons with hours workedFootnote 29 15,309,975 8,131,765 7,178,210
Fewer than 30 hours (part time) 2,697,970 936,130 1,761,840
1 to 19 hours 1,402,670 515,130 887,540
20 to 29 hours 1,295,300 421,005 874,295
30 hours or more (full time) 12,612,005 7,195,635 5,416,370
30 to 39 hours 3,090,440 1,099,685 1,990,755
40 hours 5,200,250 3,053,385 2,146,860
41 to 49 hours 1,542,635 990,105 552,535
50 hours or more 2,778,680 2,052,455 726,225
Average hours worked 38.9 42.2 35.1
Total employed labour force by place of work statusFootnote 30 16,021,175 8,431,530 7,589,645
Worked at home 1,230,350 623,285 607,065
Worked outside Canada 76,570 52,480 24,095
No fixed workplace address 1,644,360 1,260,935 383,425
Usual place of work 13,069,895 6,494,830 6,575,070
Total labour force by highest certificate, diploma or degreeFootnote 31 17,146,135 9,020,595 8,125,535
No certificate, diploma or degree 2,613,385 1,559,945 1,053,440
Certificate, diploma or degree 14,532,745 7,460,645 7,072,100
High school certificate or equivalentFootnote 32 4,507,305 2,317,520 2,189,785
Apprenticeship or trades certificate or diploma 2,022,800 1,336,375 686,420
College, CEGEP or other non-university certificate or diplomaFootnote 33 3,462,335 1,576,535 1,885,795
University certificate or diploma below bachelor levelFootnote 34 804,025 366,980 437,045
University certificate, diploma or degree at bachelor's level or aboveFootnote 35 3,736,290 1,863,235 1,873,050
Bachelor's degree 2,415,815 1,153,420 1,262,400
University certificate or diploma above bachelor level 379,260 174,005 205,260
Degree in medicine, dentistry, veterinary medicine or optometry 110,890 66,995 43,895
Master's degree 692,135 375,155 316,980
Earned doctorate 138,190 93,665 44,520
Total labour force by major field of study - Classification of Instructional Programs, 2000Footnote 36 17,146,135 9,020,595 8,125,540
No postsecondary certificate, diploma or degree 7,120,690 3,877,465 3,243,230
Education 662,775 171,520 491,265
Visual and performing arts, and communications technologies 379,350 181,570 197,780
Humanities 527,890 219,450 308,440
Social and behavioural sciences and law 1,025,475 375,330 650,145
Business, management and public administration 2,174,630 835,020 1,339,610
Physical and life sciences and technologies 351,700 193,390 158,310
Mathematics, computer and information sciences 480,135 305,185 174,955
Architecture, engineering, and related technologies 2,288,330 2,114,425 173,900
Agriculture, natural resources and conservation 238,055 166,970 71,085
Health, parks, recreation and fitness 1,292,715 265,430 1,027,285
Personal, protective and transportation services 602,620 314,225 288,390
Other fields of studyFootnote 37 1,770 625 1,140
Total labour force by location of studyFootnote 38 17,146,135 9,020,595 8,125,535
No postsecondary certificate, diploma or degree 7,120,690 3,877,460 3,243,225
Postsecondary certificate, diploma or degree 10,025,445 5,143,130 4,882,315
Inside Canada 8,615,450 4,363,150 4,252,295
Outside Canada 1,410,000 779,980 630,015
Total labour force by industry - North American Industry Classification System 2002Footnote 39 17,146,135 9,020,595 8,125,540
Industry - Not applicableFootnote 40 284,955 135,785 149,165
All industriesFootnote 41 16,861,180 8,884,810 7,976,375
111-112 Farms 384,815 254,720 130,090
113 Forestry and logging 59,960 52,595 7,365
114 Fishing, hunting and trapping 42,385 34,820 7,565
115 Support activities for agriculture and forestry 36,495 26,650 9,845
211 Oil and gas extraction 72,465 52,775 19,695
212 Mining (except oil and gas) 60,480 52,585 7,895
213 Support activities for mining and oil and gas extraction 103,515 87,735 15,775
219 Mining - unspecified 2,360 2,070 285
221 Utilities 132,945 100,040 32,910
236 Construction of buildings 375,725 329,170 46,560
237 Heavy and civil engineering construction 115,515 99,240 16,275
238 Specialty trade contractors 577,860 510,565 67,295
311 Food manufacturing 250,685 145,140 105,540
312 Beverage and tobacco product manufacturing 31,205 22,515 8,695
313 Textile mills 17,735 10,425 7,310
314 Textile product mills 17,895 8,565 9,330
315 Clothing manufacturing 68,065 16,040 52,025
316 Leather and allied product manufacturing 7,535 3,480 4,050
321 Wood product manufacturing 146,495 123,235 23,260
322 Paper manufacturing 90,170 73,665 16,505
323 Printing and related support activities 91,240 56,695 34,545
324 Petroleum and coal products manufacturing 14,810 11,815 2,995
325 Chemical manufacturing 92,265 57,055 35,210
326 Plastics and rubber products manufacturing 125,345 83,975 41,365
327 Non-metallic mineral product manufacturing 61,495 50,335 11,155
331 Primary metal manufacturing 84,250 73,875 10,380
332 Fabricated metal product manufacturing 186,730 152,065 34,665
333 Machinery manufacturing 131,060 108,805 22,250
334 Computer and electronic product manufacturing 89,725 57,500 32,220
335 Electrical equipment, appliance and component manufacturing 48,550 34,110 14,440
336 Transportation equipment manufacturing 263,785 205,775 58,010
337 Furniture and related product manufacturing 110,555 82,405 28,150
339 Miscellaneous manufacturing 76,390 44,065 32,330
411 Farm product wholesaler-distributors 9,130 5,360 3,770
412 Petroleum product wholesaler-distributors 15,315 10,530 4,790
413 Food, beverage and tobacco wholesaler-distributors 111,530 74,000 37,530
414 Personal and household goods wholesaler-distributors 100,950 48,130 52,820
415 Motor vehicle and parts wholesaler-distributors 56,680 44,005 12,675
416 Building material and supplies wholesaler-distributors 110,780 82,525 28,255
417 Machinery, equipment and supplies wholesaler-distributors 200,790 143,395 57,395
418 Miscellaneous wholesaler-distributors 100,095 65,565 34,530
419 Wholesale agents and brokers 34,025 21,060 12,965
441 Motor vehicle and parts dealers 196,845 153,160 43,685
442 Furniture and home furnishings stores 79,920 41,165 38,755
443 Electronics and appliance stores 73,055 50,000 23,055
444 Building material and garden equipment and supplies dealers 127,000 77,995 49,000
445 Food and beverage stores 477,335 213,340 263,995
446 Health and personal care stores 157,485 41,420 116,065
447 Gasoline stations 74,845 42,760 32,085
448 Clothing and clothing accessories stores 210,340 43,215 167,120
451 Sporting goods, hobby, book and music stores 89,315 44,315 44,995
452 General merchandise stores 251,095 84,155 166,940
453 Miscellaneous store retailers 130,330 45,520 84,810
454 Non-store retailers 49,610 22,670 26,940
481 Air transportation 62,320 37,885 24,435
482 Rail transportation 35,850 31,925 3,920
483 Water transportation 13,195 10,060 3,135
484 Truck transportation 278,400 238,280 40,120
485 Transit and ground passenger transportation 144,675 104,910 39,770
486 Pipeline transportation 4,335 3,025 1,310
487 Scenic and sightseeing transportation 3,015 1,880 1,130
488 Support activities for transportation 106,155 76,215 29,945
491 Postal service 75,470 38,990 36,480
492 Couriers and messengers 62,580 47,060 15,525
493 Warehousing and storage 34,200 24,910 9,290
511 Publishing industries (except Internet) 106,380 55,715 50,665
512 Motion picture and sound recording industries 67,155 40,915 26,240
515 Broadcasting (except Internet) 44,235 25,020 19,215
516 Internet publishing and broadcasting 1,800 1,185 615
517 Telecommunications 138,615 81,525 57,090
518 Internet service providers, web search portals, and data processing services 19,455 11,040 8,415
519 Other information services 39,695 9,890 29,800
521 Monetary authorities - central bank 1,750 690 1,065
522 Credit intermediation and related activities 335,435 103,330 232,105
523 Securities, commodity contracts, and other financial investment and related activities 123,510 66,895 56,615
524 Insurance carriers and related activities 222,475 80,090 142,390
526 Funds and other financial vehicles 6,040 2,660 3,380
531 Real estate 224,915 115,600 109,320
532 Rental and leasing services 76,400 48,885 27,510
533 Lessors of non-financial intangible assets (except copyrighted works) 2,195 1,145 1,060
541 Professional, scientific and technical services 1,122,445 621,925 500,520
551 Management of companies and enterprises 20,535 10,410 10,125
561 Administrative and support services 685,815 370,525 315,290
562 Waste management and remediation services 36,885 30,095 6,790
611 Educational services 1,150,535 379,910 770,620
621 Ambulatory health care services 480,440 108,705 371,735
622 Hospitals 563,660 108,955 454,710
623 Nursing and residential care facilities 314,910 46,140 268,770
624 Social assistance 357,240 44,255 312,985
711 Performing arts, spectator sports and related industries 106,335 56,890 49,450
712 Heritage institutions 29,175 12,745 16,425
713 Amusement, gambling and recreation industries 210,800 108,160 102,645
721 Accommodation services 207,510 79,325 128,180
722 Food services and drinking places 919,185 367,215 551,970
811 Repair and maintenance 278,720 233,555 45,160
812 Personal and laundry services 233,560 52,750 180,810
813 Religious, grant-making, civic, and professional and similar organizations 230,570 89,435 141,130
814 Private households 77,035 8,095 68,935
911 Federal government public administration 396,545 212,105 184,440
912 Provincial and territorial public administration 263,230 116,605 146,620
913 Local, municipal and regional public administration 286,350 172,610 113,735
914 Aboriginal public administration 29,675 14,530 15,140
919 International and other extra-territorial public administration 2,815 1,315 1,495
Total - Employment income and work activityFootnote 42 25,664,220 12,470,785 13,193,440
Did not work or had no employment income in 2005Footnote 43 8,622,380 3,562,760 5,059,620
Worked full year full time with employment incomeFootnote 44 9,275,770 5,332,045 3,943,725
Average employment income $ 51,221 58,537 41,331
Median employment income $ 41,401 46,778 35,830
Standard error of average employment income $ 52 86 37
Worked part year or part time with employment incomeFootnote 45 7,766,075 3,575,985 4,190,090
Average employment income $ 22,398 27,304 18,211
Median employment income $ 13,072 15,047 11,840
Standard error of average employment income $ 41 82 29

Footnotes

Footnote 1

Excludes census data for one or more incompletely enumerated Indian reserves or Indian settlements.

Return to footnote 1 referrer

Footnote 2

Age
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to the age at last birthday (as of the census reference date, May 16, 2006). This variable is derived from Date of birth.

Return to footnote 2 referrer

Footnote 3

Refers to the relationship between a person's usual place of residence on Census Day and his or her usual place of residence one year earlier. A person is classified as a non-mover if no difference exists. Otherwise, a person is classified as a mover and this categorization is called Mobility status (1 year ago). Within the category of movers, a further distinction is made between non-migrants and migrants; this difference is called migration status.

Non-movers are persons who, on Census Day, were living at the same address as the one at which they resided one year earlier.

Movers are persons who, on Census Day, were living at a different address from the one at which they resided one year earlier.

Non-migrants are movers who, on Census Day, were living at a different address, but in the same census subdivision (CSD) as the one they lived in one year earlier.

Migrants are movers who, on Census Day, were residing in a different CSD one year earlier (internal migrants) or who were living outside Canada one year earlier (external migrants).

Intraprovincial migrants are movers who, on Census Day, were living in a different census subdivision from the one at which they resided one year earlier, in the same province.

Interprovincial migrants are movers who, on Census Day, were living in a different census subdivision from the one at which they resided one year earlier, in a different province.

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Footnote 4

Refers to the relationship between a person's usual place of residence on Census Day and his or her usual place of residence five years earlier. A person is classified as a non-mover if no difference exists. Otherwise, a person is classified as a mover and this categorization is called Mobility status (5 years ago). Within the movers category, a further distinction is made between non-migrants and migrants; this difference is called migration status.

Non-movers are persons who, on Census Day, were living at the same address as the one at which they resided five years earlier.

Movers are persons who, on Census Day, were living at a different address from the one at which they resided five years earlier.

Non-migrants are movers who, on Census Day, were living at a different address, but in the same census subdivision (CSD) as the one they lived in five years earlier.

Migrants are movers who, on Census Day, were residing in a different CSD five years earlier (internal migrants) or who were living outside Canada five years earlier (external migrants).

Intraprovincial migrants are movers who, on Census Day, were living in a different census subdivision from the one in which they resided five years earlier, in the same province.

Interprovincial migrants are movers who, on Census Day, were living in a different census subdivision from the one in which they resided five years earlier, in a different province.

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Footnote 5

Mother tongue
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to the first language learned at home in childhood and still understood by the individual at the time of the census.

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Footnote 6

Refers to the language used most often at work by the individual at the time of the census. Data on other languages used at work on a regular basis are also collected.

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Footnote 7

Landed immigrant status
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to whether or not the person is a landed immigrant in Canada. Landed immigrants are people who have been granted the right to live in Canada permanently by immigration authorities.

Non-immigrant population
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to people who are Canadian citizens by birth. Although most were born in Canada, a small number of them were born outside Canada to Canadian parents.

Immigrant population
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to people who are, or have been, landed immigrants in Canada. A landed immigrant is a person who has been granted the right to live in Canada permanently by immigration authorities. Some immigrants have resided in Canada for a number of years, while others have arrived recently. Most immigrants are born outside Canada, but a small number were born in Canada.

Non-permanent resident
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to people from another country who had a Work or Study Permit, or who were refugee claimants at the time of the census, and family members living in Canada with them.

Period of immigration
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to ranges of years based on the year of immigration question. Year of immigration refers to the year in which landed immigrant status was first obtained. A landed immigrant is a person who has been granted the right to live in Canada permanently by immigration authorities.

Year of immigration
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to the year in which landed immigrant status was first obtained. A landed immigrant is a person who has been granted the right to live in Canada permanently by immigration authorities.

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Footnote 8

Non-immigrants are persons who are Canadian citizens by birth. Although most Canadian citizens by birth were born in Canada, a small number were born outside Canada to Canadian parents.

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Footnote 9

Immigrants are persons who are, or have ever been, landed immigrants in Canada. A landed immigrant is a person who has been granted the right to live in Canada permanently by immigration authorities. Some immigrants have resided in Canada for a number of years, while others are recent arrivals. Most immigrants are born outside Canada, but a small number were born in Canada. Includes immigrants who landed in Canada prior to Census Day, May 16, 2006.

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Footnote 10

Includes immigrants who landed in Canada prior to Census Day, May 16, 2006.

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Footnote 11

Non-permanent residents are persons from another country who, at the time of the census, held a Work or Study Permit or who were refugee claimants, as well as family members living with them in Canada.

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Footnote 12

Visible minority population
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to the visible minority group to which the respondent belongs. The Employment Equity Act defines visible minorities as 'persons, other than Aboriginal peoples, who are non-Caucasian in race or non-white in colour'.

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Footnote 13

The Employment Equity Act defines visible minorities as 'persons, other than Aboriginal peoples, who are non-Caucasian in race or non-white in colour'.

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Footnote 14

For example, 'East Indian', 'Pakistani', 'Sri Lankan', etc.

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Footnote 15

For example, 'Vietnamese', 'Cambodian', 'Malaysian', 'Laotian', etc.

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Footnote 16

For example, 'Iranian', 'Afghan', etc.

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Footnote 17

The abbreviation 'n.i.e.' means 'not included elsewhere'. Includes respondents who reported a write-in response such as 'Guyanese', 'West Indian', 'Kurd', 'Tibetan', 'Polynesian', 'Pacific Islander', etc.

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Footnote 18

Includes respondents who reported more than one visible minority group by checking two or more mark-in circles, e.g., 'Black' and 'South Asian'.

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Footnote 19

Includes respondents who reported 'Yes' to the Aboriginal identity question (Question 18) as well as respondents who were not considered to be members of a visible minority group.

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Footnote 20

Labour force activity
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to the labour market activity of the population 15 years of age and over in the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006). Respondents were classified as Employed, Unemployed, or Not in the labour force. The labour force includes the employed and the unemployed.

Labour force
Part A - Plain language definition:
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition:
Refers to persons who were either employed or unemployed during the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006).
Labour force = Employed + Unemployed

Employed
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Persons who, during the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006):
(a) did any work at all for pay or in self-employment or without pay in a family farm, business or professional practice
(b) were absent from their job or business, with or without pay, for the entire week because of a vacation, an illness, a labour dispute at their place of work, or any other reasons.

Unemployed
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Persons who, during the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006), were without paid work or without self-employment work and were available for work and either:
(a) had actively looked for paid work in the past four weeks; or
(b) were on temporary lay-off and expected to return to their job; or
(c) had definite arrangements to start a new job in four weeks or less.

Not in the labour force
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to persons who, in the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006), were neither employed nor unemployed. It includes students, homemakers, retired workers, seasonal workers in an 'off' season who were not looking for work, and persons who could not work because of a long term illness or disability.

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Footnote 21

Work activity in 2005
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to the number of weeks in which a person worked for pay or in self-employment in 2005 at all jobs held, even if only for a few hours, and whether these weeks were mostly full time (30 hours or more per week) or mostly part time (1 to 29 hours per week).
The term 'full-year full-time workers' refers to persons 15 years of age and over who worked 49 to 52 weeks (mostly full time) in 2005 for pay or in self-employment.

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Footnote 22

Includes persons who never worked, persons who worked prior to 2005 only, or persons who worked in 2006 only.

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Footnote 23

Persons in this category are also referred to as full-year, full-time workers.

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Footnote 24

Class of worker
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
This variable classifies persons who reported a job into the following categories:
(a) persons who worked mainly for wages, salaries, commissions, tips, piece-rates, or payments 'in kind' (payments in goods or services rather than money);
(b) persons who worked mainly for themselves, with or without paid help, operating a business, farm or professional practice, alone or in partnership;
(c) persons who worked without pay in a family business, farm or professional practice owned or operated by a related household member; unpaid family work does not include unpaid housework, unpaid childcare, unpaid care to seniors and volunteer work.
The job reported was the one held in the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to enumeration (May 16, 2006) if the person was employed, or the job of longest duration since January 1, 2005, if the person was not employed during the reference week. Persons with two or more jobs in the reference week were asked to provide information for the job at which they worked the most hours.

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Footnote 25

Unemployed persons 15 years and over who have never worked for pay or in self-employment or who had last worked prior to January 1, 2005 only.

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Footnote 26

Refers to the experienced labour force population: includes persons who were employed and persons who were unemployed who worked for pay or in self-employment since January 1, 2005.

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Footnote 27

Hours worked for pay or in self-employment
Part A - Plain language definition
Actual number of hours that persons worked for pay or in self-employment at all jobs they held during the week of May 7 to 13, 2006.
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to the actual number of hours that persons worked for pay or in self-employment at all jobs held in the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006). This includes hours worked for wages, salaries, tips, commissions, piece-rate payments or payments 'in kind' (payments in goods or services rather than money). Hours worked in one's own business, farm or professional practice or hours worked without pay in a family business, farm or professional practice, owned or operated by a relative living in the same household are also included.
Excluded are hours during which the respondent was absent, with or without pay, for part of the week because of illness, vacation, or other reasons.

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Footnote 28

Refers to employed persons who were absent from their job in the reference week.

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Footnote 29

Refers to employed persons who worked one or more hours in the reference week.

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Footnote 30

Place of work status
Part A - Plain language definition
Classification of people aged 15 or over who worked at some point between January 1, 2005 and May 16, 2006 (Census Day), according to whether they worked at home, worked outside Canada, had no fixed workplace address, or worked at a specific address.
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to the place of work of non-institutional residents 15 years of age and over who worked at some time since January 1, 2005. The variable usually relates to the individual's job held in the week prior to enumeration. However, if the person did not work during that week but had worked at some time since January 1, 2005, the information relates to the job held longest during that period.

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Footnote 31

'Highest certificate, diploma or degree' refers to the highest certificate, diploma or degree completed based on a hierarchy which is generally related to the amount of time spent 'in-class'. For postsecondary completers, a university education is considered to be a higher level of schooling than a college education, while a college education is considered to be a higher level of education than in the trades. Although some trades requirements may take as long or longer to complete than a given college or university program, the majority of time is spent in on-the-job paid training and less time is spent in the classroom.

Census questions relating to education changed substantially between 2001 and 2006, principally to reflect developments in Canada's education system. These changes improved the quality of data and provided more precise information on the level of educational attainment as well as fields of study.

However, users should be aware that changes to the education portion of the 2006 Census questionnaire have affected the comparability of some 2006 Census data with data from previous censuses. More information on the historical comparability of specific categories of 'Highest certificate, diploma or degree' is available in the Education Reference Guide, 2006 Census, catalogue number 97-560-GWE2006003.

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Highest certificate, diploma or degree
Part A - Plain language definition
Information indicating the person's most advanced certificate, diploma or degree.
Part B - Detailed definition
This is a derived variable obtained from the educational qualifications questions, which asked for all certificates, diplomas and degrees to be reported. There is an implied hierarchy in this variable (secondary school graduation, registered apprenticeship and trades, college, university) which is loosely tied to the 'in-class' duration of the various types of education. However, at the detailed level a registered apprenticeship graduate may not have completed a secondary school certificate or diploma, nor does an individual with a master's degree necessarily have a certificate or diploma above the bachelor's degree level. Therefore, although the sequence is more or less hierarchical, it is a general rather than an absolute gradient measure of academic achievement.

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Footnote 32

'High school certificate or equivalent' includes persons who have graduated from a secondary school or equivalent. Excludes persons with a postsecondary certificate, diploma or degree. Examples of postsecondary institutions include community colleges, institutes of technology, CEGEPs, private trade schools, private business colleges, schools of nursing and universities.

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Footnote 33

'College, CEGEP or other non-university certificate or diploma' replaces the category 'Other non university certificate or diploma' in previous censuses. This category includes accreditation by non degree-granting institutions such as community colleges, CEGEPs, private business colleges and technical institutes.

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Footnote 34

The overall quality of the 'Highest certificate, diploma or degree' variable from the 2006 Census is acceptable. However, users of the 'University certificate or diploma below the bachelor level' category should know that an unexpected growth in this category was noted compared to the 2001 Census.

In fact, in the 2001 Census, 2.5% of respondents aged 15 years or over declared such a diploma, compared to 4.4% in 2006, representing 89% growth. This phenomenon was not found in other sources like the Labour Force Survey.

We recommend users interpret the 2006 Census results for this category with caution.

For more information on factors that may explain such variances in census data, such as response errors and processing errors, please refer to the 2006 Census Dictionary, Appendix B: Data quality, sampling and weighting, confidentiality and random rounding.

More information is available in the Education Reference Guide, 2006 Census, catalogue number 97-560-GWE2006003.

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Footnote 35

Questions pertaining to university degrees attained in 2006 (for example bachelor's degrees or master's degrees) were similar to those asked in 2001. Data for the university categories (bachelor's degree through to earned doctorate) are comparable over time.

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Footnote 36

'Field of study' is defined as the main discipline or subject of learning. It is collected for the highest certificate, diploma or degree above the high school or secondary school level.

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Major field of study - Classification of Instructional Programs (CIP)
Part A - Plain language definition
Main subject area of the person's highest certificate, diploma or degree after high school.
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to the predominant discipline or area of learning or training of a person's highest postsecondary certificate, diploma or degree. The Classification of Instructional Programs (CIP [Canada 2000]) major field of study classification structure consists of 13 major categories or primary groupings, 12 of which are used for the census (the category which includes courses in personal development is not used). The 12 primary groupings are: education; visual and performing arts, and communications technologies; humanities; social and behavioural sciences and law; business, management and public administration; physical and life sciences and technologies; mathematics, computer and information sciences; architecture, engineering and related technologies; agriculture, natural resources and conservation; health, parks, recreation and fitness; personal, protective and transportation services; other.

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Footnote 37

Includes Multidisciplinary/interdisciplinary studies, Other.

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Footnote 38

'Location of study' refers to the province, territory or country where the highest certificate, diploma or degree above the high school level was completed.

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Location of study
Part A - Plain language definition
Indicates the province, territory or country where the highest certificate, diploma or degree was obtained.
Part B - Detailed definition
This variable indicates the province, territory (in Canada) or country (outside Canada) where the highest certificate, diploma or degree was obtained. It is only reported for individuals who had completed a certificate, diploma or degree above the secondary (high) school level.

Return to footnote 38 referrer

Footnote 39

Industry (based on the 2002 North American Industry Classification System [NAICS])
Part A - Plain language definition
General nature of the business carried out in the establishment where the person worked. The 2006 Census data on industry (based on the 2002 NAICS) can be compared with data from Canada's NAFTA partners (United States and Mexico).
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to the general nature of the business carried out in the establishment where the person worked. If the person did not have a job during the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to enumeration (May 16, 2006), the data relate to the job of longest duration since January 1, 2005. Persons with two or more jobs were required to report the information for the job at which they worked the most hours.
The 2006 Census industry data are produced according to the 2002 NAICS. The NAICS provides enhanced industry comparability among the three North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) trading partners (Canada, United States and Mexico). This classification consists of a systematic and comprehensive arrangement of industries structured into 20 sectors, 103 subsectors and 328 industry groups. The criteria used to create these categories are similarity of input structures, labour skills or production processes used by the establishment. For further information on the classification, see North American Industry Classification System, Canada, 2002, Catalogue no. 12-501-XPE.

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Footnote 40

Unemployed persons 15 years and over who have never worked for pay or in self-employment or who had last worked prior to January 1, 2005, only.

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Footnote 41

Refers to the experienced labour force population: includes persons who were employed and persons who were unemployed who worked for pay or in self-employment since January 1, 2005.

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Footnote 42

Earnings or employment income - Refers to total income received by persons 15 years of age and over during calendar year 2005 as wages and salaries, net income from a non-farm unincorporated business and/or professional practice, and/or net farm self-employment income.

Wages and salaries - Refers to gross wages and salaries before deductions for such items as income tax, pensions and Employment Insurance. Included in this source are military pay and allowances, tips, commissions and cash bonuses, benefits from wage-loss replacement plans or income-maintenance insurance plans, supplementary unemployment benefits from an employer or union as well as all types of casual earnings during calendar year 2005. Other employment income such as taxable benefits, research grants and royalties are included.

Net farm income - Refers to net income (gross receipts from farm sales minus depreciation and cost of operation) received during calendar year 2005 from the operation of a farm, either on the respondent's own account or in partnership. In the case of partnerships, only the respondent's share of income was reported. Included with gross receipts are cash advances received in 2005, dividends from cooperatives, rebates and farm support payments to farmers from federal, provincial and regional agricultural programs (for example, milk subsidies and marketing board payments) and gross insurance proceeds such as payments from the Net Income Stabilization Account (NISA). The value of income 'in kind,' such as agricultural products produced and consumed on the farm, is excluded.

Net non-farm income from unincorporated business and/or professional practice - Refers to net income (gross receipts minus expenses of operation such as wages, rents and depreciation) received during calendar year 2005 from the respondent's non-farm unincorporated business or professional practice. In the case of partnerships, only the respondent's share was reported. Also included is net income from persons babysitting in their own homes, persons providing room and board to non relatives, self-employed fishers, hunters and trappers, operators of direct distributorships such as those selling and delivering cosmetics, as well as freelance activities of artists, writers, music teachers, hairdressers, dressmakers, etc.

Receipts not counted as income - The income concept excludes gambling gains and losses, lottery prizes, money inherited during the year in a lump sum, capital gains or losses, receipts from the sale of property, income tax refunds, loan payments received, lump sum settlements of insurance policies, rebates received on property taxes, refunds of pension contributions as well as all income 'in kind,' such as free meals and living accommodations, or agricultural products produced and consumed on the farm.

Average income of individuals - Average income of individuals refers to the weighted mean total income of individuals 15 years of age and over who reported income for 2005. Average income is calculated from unrounded data by dividing the aggregate income of a specified group of individuals (e.g., males 45 to 54 years of age) by the number of individuals with income in that group.

Median income of individuals - The median income of a specified group of income recipients is that amount which divides their income size distribution into two halves, i.e., the incomes of the first half of individuals are below the median, while those of the second half are above the median. Median income is calculated from the unrounded number of individuals (e.g., males 45 to 54 years of age) with income in that group.

Standard error of average income - Refers to the estimated standard error of average income for an income size distribution. If interpreted as shown below, it serves as a rough indicator of the precision of the corresponding estimate of average income. For about 68% of the samples which could be selected from the sample frame, the difference between the sample estimate of average income and the corresponding figure based on complete enumeration would be less than one standard error. For about 95% of the possible samples, the difference would be less than two standard errors and, in about 99% of the samples, the difference would be less than approximately two and one half standard errors.

Average and median incomes and standard errors of average income of individuals will be calculated for those individuals who are at least 15 years of age and who have an income (positive or negative). For all other universes (families [census/economic], persons 15 years of age and over not in families or private households), these statistics will be calculated over all units, whether or not they reported any income.

These statistics can be derived for after-tax income, earnings, wages and salaries, or any other particular source of income in the same manner.

Work activity - Refers to the number of weeks in which a person worked for pay or in self-employment in the reference year at all jobs held, even if only for a few hours, and whether these weeks were mostly full time (30 hours or more per week) or mostly part time (1 to 29 hours per week). Persons with a part-time job for part of the year and a full-time job for another part of the year were to report the information for the job at which they worked the most weeks. The term 'Full-year full-time workers' refers to persons 15 years of age and over who worked 49 to 52 weeks (mostly full time) in the reference year for pay or in self-employment.

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Footnote 43

Includes persons who never worked, persons who worked prior to 2005 only, persons who worked in 2006 only, as well as persons who worked in 2005 but had no employment income.

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Footnote 44

Was an earner or employment income recipient and worked 49 to 52 weeks in 2005, mostly full time.

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Footnote 45

Was an earner or employment income recipient and worked less than 49 weeks or worked mostly part time in 2005.

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Source: Statistics Canada, 2006 Census of Population, Statistics Canada Catalogue no. 97-564-XCB2006005.

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