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Visual Census – Language, New Brunswick

Catalogue number: 98-315-X2011001

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Figure 4.1 Population by knowledge of official languages, New Brunswick, 2011

Figure

This bar graph shows the population (in percentage) by knowledge of official languages, New Brunswick, 2011.

The Y axis shows percentage of population.

The X axis shows, from left to right, English only, French only, English and French and neither English nor French.

Table 4.1 Population by knowledge of official languages, New Brunswick, 2011
Table Summary

This table shows the percentage of the population by knowledge of official languages. The column headings are: official language and population in percentage. The rows are: English only, French only, English and French and neither English nor French along with their corresponding values.

Official language Population (percentage)
English only 57.7
French only 9.0
English and French 33.2
Neither English nor French 0.1

Figure 4.2 The most common non-official-language mother tongues,Footnote 1 New Brunswick, 2011

Figure

This vertical bar graph shows the most common non-official-language mother tongues, New Brunswick, 2011.

The Y axis shows the following mother tongues:

  • Mi'kmaq
  • German
  • Korean
  • Arabic
  • Spanish
  • Chinese, n.o.s.
  • Dutch
  • Tagalog (Pilipino, Filipino)
  • Italian
  • Persian (Farsi)

The X axis shows number of responses.

Table 4.2 The most common non-official-language mother tongues,Footnote 1 New Brunswick, 2011
Table Summary

This table shows the most common non-official-language mother tongues. The column headings are: mother tongue and number of responses. The rows are the most common non-official-language mother tongues and their corresponding values.

Mother tongue Number of responses
Mi'kmaq 2,215
German 1,900
Korean 1,860
Arabic 1,460
Spanish 1,240
Chinese, n.o.s. 1,235
Dutch 965
Tagalog (Pilipino, Filipino) 690
Italian 475
Persian (Farsi) 460

Figure 4.3 Mother-tongue retention,Footnote 2 New Brunswick, 2011

Figure

This stacked bar graph shows mother-tongue retention, New Brunswick, 2011. There are two data series, one showing complete retention (language spoken most often at home) and the other showing partial retention (language spoken regularly at home).

The Y axis shows the following mother tongues: English, French and non-official language.

The X axis shows mother-tongue retention in percentage.

Table 4.3 Mother-tongue retention,Footnote 2 New Brunswick, 2011
Table Summary

This table shows mother-tongue retention. The column headings are: mother tongue and mother-tongue retention in percentage. The latter is divided in complete retention, language spoken most often at home and partial retention, language spoken regularly at home. The rows are: English, French and non-official language along with their corresponding values.

Mother tongue Mother-tongue retention (in percentage)
Complete retention: Language spoken most often at home Partial retention: Language spoken regularly at home
English 98.6 0.8
French 87.3 6.3
Non-official language 53.4 24.1

Footnotes

Footnote 1

Counts for mother tongue include single response of a language as well as multiple responses of a language with English and/or French.

Return to footnote 1 referrer

Footnote 2

Counts for mother tongue and home language include single response of a language as well as multiple responses of a language with English and/or French. Retention refers to the situation where people speak their mother tongue at home. Retention is defined as 'complete' when the mother tongue is the language spoken most often and 'partial' when it is spoken on a regular basis but not most often. The (complete or partial) retention rate refers to the proportion of the population with a given mother tongue that speaks that language at home most often or on a regular basis. The retention rate provides an indication of a group's linguistic vitality, particularly the importance of transmitting languages between generations.

Return to footnote 2 referrer

Sources

Figure 4.1, Figure 4.2, Figure 4.3

Source: Statistics Canada, 2011 Census of population.

How to cite

Statistics Canada. 2012. Visual Census. 2011 Census. Ottawa. Released October 24, 2012.
http://www12.statcan.gc.ca/census-recensement/2011/dp-pd/vc-rv/index.cfm?Lang=ENG&TOPIC_ID=4&GEOCODE=13 (accessed September 27, 2020).

Additional information

Additional information for this topic is available on the Census release topics and dates page.

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