Focus on Geography Series, 2016 Census

Figure 1.1 Distribution of the Aboriginal population by population centre size, Alberta, 2016

Figure

This donut chart shows the distribution of the Aboriginal identity population by population centre size. The population is divided into four categories: rural, small population centre, medium population centre and large population centre.

Table 1.1 Distribution of the Aboriginal population by population centre size, Alberta, 2016
Table summary

The following table shows the distribution of the Aboriginal identity population by population centre size, Alberta, 2016. The column headings are: population centre size and Aboriginal population (%). The rows are: rural, small population centre, medium population centre and large population centre along with their corresponding values.

Population centre size Aboriginal population (%)
Rural 36.8
Small population centre 15.8
Medium population centre 12.3
Large population centre 35.0

Figure 1.2 Distribution of the First Nations population with registered Indian status by residence on or off reserve, Alberta, 2016

Figure

This donut chart shows the distribution of the First Nations population with registered Indian status by residence on or off reserve, Alberta, 2016.

Table 1.2 Distribution of the First Nations population with registered Indian status by residence on or off reserve, Alberta, 2016
Table summary

The following table shows the distribution of the Aboriginal identity population by population centre size, Alberta, 2016. The column headings are: residence, First Nations population with registered Indian status. The rows are: on reserve, off reserve and their corresponding values.

Residence First Nations population with registered Indian status (%)
On reserve 43.9
Off reserve 56.1

Figure 1.3 Age distribution by Aboriginal identity, Alberta, 2016

Figure

This bar chart shows the age distribution (in percentage) by two groups: Aboriginal identity and non-Aboriginal identity.

The Y axis shows, from top to bottom, the following age groups: under 15 years, 15 to 24 years, 25 to 34 years, 35 to 44 years, 45 to 54 years, 55 to 64 years, 65 to 74 years and 75 years and over.

The X axis shows the percentage of the population in each age group.

Table 1.3 Age distribution by Aboriginal identity, Alberta, 2016
Table summary

The following table shows the age distribution by Aboriginal identity, Alberta, 2016. The column headings are: age groups, Aboriginal identity and non-Aboriginal identity. The rows are: the age groups along with their corresponding values.

Age groups Aboriginal identity (%) Non-Aboriginal identity (%)
65 years and over 5.2 11.8
55 to 64 years 8.0 12.7
45 to 54 years 11.7 13.9
35 to 44 years 12.5 14.7
25 to 34 years 15.8 16.0
15 to 24 years 17.7 12.1
0 to 14 years 29.1 18.7

Figure 1.4 Top census metropolitan areas and census agglomerations by Aboriginal identity, Alberta, 2016

Figure

This bar chart shows the top census metropolitan areas or census agglomerations with the highest number of Aboriginal people in Alberta, 2016.

The Y axis shows Edmonton, Calgary, Wood Buffalo, Grande Prairie, Lethbridge, Red Deer, Medicine Hat, Lloydminster, Wetaskiwin, Cold Lake.

The X axis shows the Aboriginal population number on a scale from 0 to 100,000.

Table 1.4 Top census metropolitan areas and census agglomerations by Aboriginal identity, Alberta, 2016
Table summary

The following table shows top census metropolitan areas and census agglomerations by Aboriginal identity, Alberta, 2016. The column headings are: geography and Aboriginal population. The rows are: the top census metropolitan areas and census agglomerations along with their corresponding values.

Geography Aboriginal population (%)
Edmonton 5.9
Calgary 3.0
Wood Buffalo 11.2
Grande Prairie 10.6
Lethbridge 5.4
Red Deer 5.3
Medicine Hat 4.9
Lloydminster 10.6
Wetaskiwin 14.3
Cold Lake 9.3

Figure 1.5 First Nations people, Métis and Inuit for selected Aboriginal language indicators, Alberta, 2016

Figure

This vertical bar chart shows the proportion of the First Nations single identity population, the Métis single identity population and the Inuit single identity population who were able to conduct a conversation in an Aboriginal language and who had an Aboriginal language as a mother tongue.

The Y axis shows the percentage of the population who were able to conduct a conversation in an Aboriginal language and who had an Aboriginal language as a mother tongue.

The X axis shows the two bars of those who were able to conduct a conversation in an Aboriginal language and who had an Aboriginal language as a mother tongue for three groups: the First Nations single identity population, the Métis single identity population and the Inuit single identity population.

Table 1.5 First Nations people, Métis and Inuit for selected Aboriginal language indicators, Alberta, 2016
Table summary

The following table shows the proportion of the First Nations, Métis and the Inuit population who were able to conduct a conversation in an Aboriginal language and who had an Aboriginal language as a mother tongue. The column headings are: Aboriginal identity, ability to conduct a conversation in an Aboriginal language and Aboriginal language as a mother tongue. The rows are: First Nations single identity, Métis single identity and Inuit single identity along with their corresponding values.

Aboriginal identity Ability to conduct a conversation in an Aboriginal language (%) Aboriginal language as a mother tongue (%)
First Nations single identity 23.8 17.2
Métis single identity 2.7 1.8
Inuit single identity 4.6 3.4

Figure 1.6 Most common Aboriginal mother tongues for the total Aboriginal Population, Alberta, 2016

Figure

This bar chart shows the most common Aboriginal mother tongues for the Aboriginal identity population.

The Y axis shows, from top to bottom, the ten most common Aboriginal mother tongues.

The X axis shows the number of people in the Aboriginal identity population who were able to speak an Aboriginal language.

Table 1.6 Most common Aboriginal mother tongues for the total Aboriginal Population, Alberta, 2016
Table summary

The following table shows the most common Aboriginal mother tongues for the total Aboriginal Population, Canada, 2016. The column headings are: languages and Aboriginal identity. The rows are: the most common Aboriginal mother tongues along with their corresponding values.

Languages Aboriginal identity
Cree, n.o.s. 14,160
Blackfoot 3,190
Stoney 3,185
Dene 1,585
Woods Cree 995
Plains Cree 910
Ojibway 540
Dakota 355
Michif 155
South Slavey 145
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