Data tables, 2016 Census

Aboriginal Mother Tongue (90), Single and Multiple Mother Tongue Responses (3), Aboriginal Identity (9), Registered or Treaty Indian Status (3) and Age (12) for the Population in Private Households of Canada, Provinces and Territories, Census Metropolitan Areas and Census Agglomerations, 2016 Census - 25% Sample Data

About this variable: Aboriginal mother tongue (90)

Definition

Mother tongue

'Mother tongue' refers to the first language learned at home in childhood and still understood by the person at the time the data was collected. If the person no longer understands the first language learned, the mother tongue is the second language learned. For a person who learned two languages at the same time in early childhood, the mother tongue is the language this person spoke most often at home before starting school. The person has two mother tongues only if the two languages were used equally often and are still understood by the person. For a child who has not yet learned to speak, the mother tongue is the language spoken most often to this child at home. The child has two mother tongues only if both languages are spoken equally often so that the child learns both languages at the same time.

Values

  1. Total - Mother tongue Footnote 1
  2. Official languages
  3. English
  4. French
  5. Non-official languages
  6. Aboriginal languages
  7. Algonquian languages
  8. Blackfoot
  9. Cree-Montagnais languages
  10. Atikamekw
  11. Montagnais (Innu)
  12. Moose Cree
  13. Naskapi
  14. Northern East Cree
  15. Plains Cree
  16. Southern East Cree
  17. Swampy Cree
  18. Woods Cree
  19. Cree, n.o.s.
  20. Eastern Algonquian languages
  21. Malecite
  22. Mi'kmaq
  23. Ojibway-Potawatomi languages
  24. Algonquin
  25. Ojibway
  26. Oji-Cree
  27. Ottawa (Odawa)
  28. Algonquian languages, n.i.e.
  29. Athabaskan languages
  30. Northern Athabaskan languages
  31. Babine (Wetsuwet'en)
  32. Beaver
  33. Carrier
  34. Chilcotin
  35. Dene
  36. Dogrib (Tlicho)
  37. Gwich'in
  38. Sarsi (Sarcee)
  39. Sekani
  40. Slavey-Hare languages
  41. North Slavey (Hare)
  42. South Slavey
  43. Slavey, n.o.s.
  44. Tahltan languages
  45. Kaska (Nahani)
  46. Tahltan
  47. Tutchone languages
  48. Northern Tutchone
  49. Southern Tutchone
  50. Athabaskan languages, n.i.e.
  51. Haida
  52. Inuit languages
  53. Inuinnaqtun
  54. Inuktitut
  55. Inuvialuktun
  56. Inuit languages, n.i.e.
  57. Iroquoian languages
  58. Cayuga
  59. Mohawk
  60. Oneida
  61. Iroquoian languages, n.i.e.
  62. Kutenai
  63. Michif
  64. Salish languages
  65. Comox
  66. Halkomelem
  67. Lillooet
  68. Okanagan
  69. Shuswap (Secwepemctsin)
  70. Squamish
  71. Straits
  72. Thompson (Ntlakapamux)
  73. Salish languages, n.i.e.
  74. Siouan languages
  75. Dakota
  76. Stoney
  77. Siouan languages, n.i.e.
  78. Tlingit
  79. Tsimshian languages
  80. Gitxsan (Gitksan)
  81. Nisga'a
  82. Tsimshian
  83. Wakashan languages
  84. Haisla
  85. Heiltsuk
  86. Kwakiutl (Kwak'wala)
  87. Nuu-chah-nulth (Nootka)
  88. Wakashan languages, n.i.e.
  89. Aboriginal languages, n.o.s.
  90. Non-Aboriginal languages

Footnotes

Footnote 1

This is a total population count. The sum of the languages in this table is greater than the total population count because a person may report more than one language in the census.

n.i.e. = not included elsewhere
n.o.s. = not otherwise specified

Return to footnote 1 referrer

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