Dictionary, Census of Population, 2016
Figure 1.12
Example of a census metropolitan area or a census agglomeration, showing core, secondary core, fringe and rural area

Release date: November 16, 2016

Figure 1.12 Example of a census metropolitan area or a census agglomeration, showing core, secondary core, fringe and rural area

Description of Figure 1.12

Figure 1.12 is a graphical representation of a census metropolitan area (CMA) or census agglomeration (CA) and its component census subdivisions (CSDs), core, fringe, and rural area. A fictional grouping of seven CSDs, shown as white polygons, represents the CSDs that form a CMA. A thick black line outlines the perimeter of the CSDs to identify the boundary of the CMA. Within the CMA/CA limits, two adjacent polygons in the top left quadrant are bordered with a thick dashed line to represent a former CA boundary, which was adjacent to the CMA or CA before being merged into it.

Within the CMA/CA boundary are six shaded, smaller polygons that overlap the CSD polygons. The largest of these smaller polygons, labelled 'A' and shaded dark grey, represents the core of the CMA/CA and appears just above the centre of the CMA/CA polygon. A second small polygon, also shaded dark grey and labelled 'B', appears on the far left of the CMA/CA and represents the secondary core. Four other smaller polygons, shaded light grey and labelled C, D, E and F, are scattered within the CMA/CA. These light grey polygons represent fringe (population centres that are neither a core nor a secondary core). The remaining white area of the CSDs is referred to as rural area.

A legend appears to the right of the diagram that defines the symbols used in the figure to represent the CMA/CA, the former CA boundary, CSD boundaries, the core, secondary core, fringe and rural area.

Source: Statistics Canada, 2016 Census of Population.

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