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Health Profile, December 2013

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Health Profile, December 2013
Table summary
The table shows total, male, and female health data grouped by geography (appearing as column headers) for selected characteristics (appearing as row headers).
Characteristic Central East
(HR)
Ontario
Change geography 1 Change geography 2
Total Male Female Total Male Female
Well-being  
Perceived health, very good or excellent (%) Health data: Footnote 1 58.5 59.4 57.7 60.4 60.7 60.1
Perceived mental health, very good or excellent (%) Health data: Footnote 3 72.9 71.7 74.0 72.4 73.2 71.7
Perceived life stress (%) Health data: Footnote 5 22.4 18.1 26.1 22.8 20.9 24.6
Health Conditions  
Overweight or obese (%) Health data: Footnote 6 52.4 60.4 45.0 52.6 60.3 45.0
Overweight (%) Health data: Footnote 7 34.9 41.9 28.4 34.3 41.1 27.6
Obese (%) Health data: Footnote 8 17.5 18.5 16.7 18.3 19.2 17.4
Arthritis (%) Health data: Footnote 10 17.6 15.7 19.2 17.2 13.4 20.7
Diabetes (%) Health data: Footnote 11 7.7 7.5 7.9Note E: use with caution 6.6 7.0 6.2
Asthma (%) Health data: Footnote 12 8.0 6.4 9.5 7.9 6.6 9.1
High blood pressure (%) Health data: Footnote 13 18.8 17.5 19.9 17.6 17.8 17.4
Mood disorder (%) Health data: Footnote 14 6.7 5.3 8.0 7.6 5.7 9.4
Pain or discomfort, moderate or severe (%) Health data: Footnote 15 14.0 11.6 16.1 14.2 11.4 16.8
Pain or discomfort that prevents activities (%) Health data: Footnote 16 15.9 14.1 17.6 15.7 13.2 18.2
Low birth weight (% of live births) Health data: Footnote 17 6.5 6.0 7.1 6.2 5.8 6.6
Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) (%) Health data: Footnote 18 4.1 3.3Note E: use with caution 4.7 3.8 3.1 4.4
Injuries within the past 12 months causing limitation of normal activities (%) Health data: Footnote 19 Note ..: not available for a specific reference period Note ..: not available for a specific reference period Note ..: not available for a specific reference period Note ..: not available for a specific reference period Note ..: not available for a specific reference period Note ..: not available for a specific reference period
Injuries in the past 12 months, sought medical attention (%) Health data: Footnote 20 Note ..: not available for a specific reference period Note ..: not available for a specific reference period Note ..: not available for a specific reference period Note ..: not available for a specific reference period Note ..: not available for a specific reference period Note ..: not available for a specific reference period
Hospitalized stroke event rate (per 100,000 population) Health data: Footnote 21 111 125 99 119 138 102
Hospitalized acute myocardial infarction event rate (per 100,000 population) Health data: Footnote 22 184 259 117 198 278 127
Injury hospitalization (per 100,000 population) Health data: Footnote 23 335 354 306 409 450 358
Cancer incidence (per 100,000 population) Health data: Footnote 24 394.3 448.0 354.5 398.8 454.7 358.0
Colon cancer incidence (per 100,000 population) Health data: Footnote 25 47.5 57.6 38.6 47.8 57.9 39.2
Lung cancer incidence (per 100,000 population) Health data: Footnote 26 47.2 55.2 41.4 49.2 58.8 42.1
Breast cancer incidence (per 100,000 population) Health data: Footnote 27 Note ...: not applicable Note ...: not applicable 98.6 Note ...: not applicable Note ...: not applicable 97.8
Prostate cancer incidence (per 100,000 population) Health data: Footnote 28 Note ...: not applicable 135.7 Note ...: not applicable Note ...: not applicable 135.7 Note ...: not applicable
Health Behaviours  
Current smoker, daily or occasional (%) Health data: Footnote 29 19.6 22.6 17.0 19.2 22.7 15.8
Current smoker, daily (%) Health data: Footnote 30 14.2 16.2 12.3 14.4 17.2 11.7
Heavy drinking (%) Health data: Footnote 31 14.1 21.6 7.4 16.9 24.4 9.7
Leisure-time physical activity, moderately active or active (%) Health data: Footnote 32 50.6 51.1 50.3 53.8 56.4 51.2
Fruit and vegetable consumption, 5 times or more per day (%) Health data: Footnote 34 34.7 30.6 38.4 38.9 32.9 44.6
Bike helmet use (%) Health data: Footnote 35 35.2 35.1 35.3 36.1 33.3 40.1
Human Function  
Participation and activity limitation, sometimes or often (%) Health data: Footnote 36 Note ..: not available for a specific reference period Note ..: not available for a specific reference period Note ..: not available for a specific reference period Note ..: not available for a specific reference period Note ..: not available for a specific reference period Note ..: not available for a specific reference period
Functional health, good to full (%) Health data: Footnote 37 Note ..: not available for a specific reference period Note ..: not available for a specific reference period Note ..: not available for a specific reference period Note ..: not available for a specific reference period Note ..: not available for a specific reference period Note ..: not available for a specific reference period
Accessibility  
Influenza immunization (%) Health data: Footnote 38 32.4 30.4 34.1 32.0 28.6 35.2
Mammography (%) Health data: Footnote 39 Note ...: not applicable Note ...: not applicable 70.6 Note ...: not applicable Note ...: not applicable 73.2
Pap smear (%) Health data: Footnote 40 Note ...: not applicable Note ...: not applicable 71.1 Note ...: not applicable Note ...: not applicable 72.9
Regular medical doctor (%) Health data: Footnote 41 92.6 90.1 94.7 91.1 88.8 93.2
Wait time for hip fracture surgery (Proportion with surgery within 48 hours) (proportion) Health data: Footnote 42 75.8 Note ...: not applicable Note ...: not applicable 81.3 Note ...: not applicable Note ...: not applicable
Appropriateness  
Caesarean section (proportion) Health data: Footnote 43 30.2 Note ...: not applicable 30.2 28.6 Note ...: not applicable 28.6
Patients with repeat hospitalizations for mental illness (%) Health data: Footnote 44 10.5 Note ...: not applicable Note ...: not applicable 10.7 Note ...: not applicable Note ...: not applicable
Effectiveness  
Ambulatory care sensitive conditions (per 100,000 population) Health data: Footnote 45 246 278 216 269 304 236
30-day acute myocardial infarction (AMI) in-hospital mortality (rate) Health data: Footnote 46 7.2 Note ...: not applicable Note ...: not applicable 7.6 Note ...: not applicable Note ...: not applicable
30-day stroke in-hospital mortality (rate) Health data: Footnote 47 14.1 Note ...: not applicable Note ...: not applicable 14.8 Note ...: not applicable Note ...: not applicable
Self-injury hospitalizations (per 100,000 population) Health data: Footnote 48 50 44 57 63 50 77
30-day obstetric readmission rate (%) Health data: Footnote 49 1.9 Note ...: not applicable 1.9 1.7 Note ...: not applicable 1.7
30-day readmission - patients age 19 and younger (%) Health data: Footnote 50 7.1 Note ...: not applicable Note ...: not applicable 6.8 Note ...: not applicable Note ...: not applicable
30-day surgical readmission rate (%) Health data: Footnote 51 6.2 Note ...: not applicable Note ...: not applicable 6.8 Note ...: not applicable Note ...: not applicable
30-day medical readmission rate (%) Health data: Footnote 52 13.2 Note ...: not applicable Note ...: not applicable 13.4 Note ...: not applicable Note ...: not applicable
Potentially avoidable mortality (per 100,000 population) Health data: Footnote 53 166.2 206.7 128.5 172.9 218.0 130.6
Avoidable mortality from preventable causes (per 100,000 population) Health data: Footnote 54 102.1 137.3 69.2 107.7 146.0 71.5
Avoidable mortality from treatable causes (per 100,000 population) Health data: Footnote 55 64.1 69.4 59.3 65.2 71.9 59.0
Continuity  
30-day readmission rate for mental illness (%) Health data: Footnote 56 11.3 Note ...: not applicable Note ...: not applicable 11.7 Note ...: not applicable Note ...: not applicable
Safety  
Hospitalized hip fracture event rate (per 100,000 population) Health data: Footnote 57 389 260 475 424 304 504
Environmental Factors  
Second-hand smoke, exposure at home (%) Health data: Footnote 58 5.8Note E: use with caution 5.7Note E: use with caution 6.0Note E: use with caution 4.5 4.5 4.5
Second-hand smoke, exposure in vehicles and/or public places (%) Health data: Footnote 59 18.6 17.4 19.7 16.7 17.4 16.0
Deaths  
Infant mortality (per 1,000 live births) Health data: Footnote 62 5.6 5.9 5.3 5.1 5.5 4.6
Life expectancy at birth (years) Health data: Footnote 63 82.1 80.0 84.0 81.5 79.2 83.6
Life expectancy at age 65 (years) Health data: Footnote 64 20.9 19.3 22.1 20.3 18.7 21.7
Total, all causes of death (per 100,000 population) Health data: Footnote 65 497.6 612.3 410.2 521.8 640.8 430.2
All cancers, deaths (per 100,000 population) Health data: Footnote 66 155.7 187.9 133.4 159.1 192.0 135.9
Colorectal cancer, deaths (per 100,000 population) Health data: Footnote 67 17.2 22.0 13.5 17.0 21.6 13.4
Lung cancer, deaths (per 100,000 population) Health data: Footnote 68 40.0 50.4 32.1 40.3 51.0 32.3
Breast cancer, deaths (per 100,000 population) Health data: Footnote 69 11.2 Note ...: not applicable 20.5 12.0 Note ...: not applicable 22.0
Prostate cancer, deaths (per 100,000 population) Health data: Footnote 70 7.6 19.2 Note ...: not applicable 8.0 20.5 Note ...: not applicable
Circulatory diseases, deaths (per 100,000 population) Health data: Footnote 71 141.5 179.3 112.2 155.6 197.1 122.9
Ischaemic heart diseases, deaths (per 100,000 population) Health data: Footnote 72 78.1 107.4 55.6 86.9 119.1 61.7
Cerebrovascular diseases, deaths (per 100,000 population) Health data: Footnote 73 29.8 33.1 27.5 30.7 33.3 28.6
All other circulatory diseases, deaths (per 100,000 population) Health data: Footnote 74 33.5 38.8 29.1 38.0 44.8 32.6
Respiratory diseases, deaths (per 100,000 population) Health data: Footnote 75 41.2 54.4 32.8 41.3 53.8 33.4
Pneumonia and influenza, deaths (per 100,000 population) Health data: Footnote 76 10.3 11.9 9.1 11.2 13.6 9.7
Bronchitis, emphysema and asthma, deaths (per 100,000 population) Health data: Footnote 77 2.3 2.8 2.0 2.2 2.8 1.8
All other respiratory diseases, deaths (per 100,000 population) Health data: Footnote 78 28.6 39.7 21.7 27.8 37.5 21.8
Unintentional injuries, deaths (per 100,000 population) Health data: Footnote 79 21.1 29.2 14.0 23.4 31.6 16.1
Suicides and self-inflicted injuries, deaths (per 100,000 population) Health data: Footnote 80 6.8 10.3 3.5 7.7 11.9 3.8
Human immunodeficiency virus [HIV] disease, deaths (per 100,000 population) Health data: Footnote 81 0.6 1.0 0.2 0.9 1.6 0.3
Premature mortality (per 100,000 population) Health data: Footnote 82 229.1 280.8 181.3 239.0 296.5 185.1
Personal Resources  
Sense of community belonging (%) Health data: Footnote 83 70.2 71.0 69.5 67.5 66.6 68.4
Life satisfaction, satisfied or very satisfied (%) Health data: Footnote 84 91.7 90.3 93.0 91.8 91.9 91.8
Living and Working Conditions  
High school graduates aged 25 to 29 (%) Health data: Footnote 85 90.3 88.4 92.1 90.8 89.0 92.6
Post-secondary graduates aged 25 to 54 (%) Health data: Footnote 86 63.9 61.9 65.8 67.2 65.1 69.1
Unemployment (%) Health data: Footnote 87 10.0 Note .: not available for any reference period Note .: not available for any reference period 7.8 Note .: not available for any reference period Note .: not available for any reference period
Youth unemployment, aged 15 to 24 (%) Health data: Footnote 88 18.0 Note .: not available for any reference period Note .: not available for any reference period 15.8 Note .: not available for any reference period Note .: not available for any reference period
Long-term unemployment (%) Health data: Footnote 89 5.9 5.7 6.0 4.8 4.7 4.9
Low income (%) Health data: Footnote 90 15.8 15.1 16.4 14.5 13.8 15.2
Children aged 17 and under living in low income families (%) Health data: Footnote 91 20.0 19.9 20.0 17.0 17.0 16.9
Community  
Total population (%) Health data: Footnote 92 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0
Large urban population centre population (%) Health data: Footnote 93 71.9 71.6 72.2 69.3 68.9 69.7
Medium population centre population (%) Health data: Footnote 94 8.3 8.2 8.4 7.4 7.3 7.5
Small population centre population (%) Health data: Footnote 95 6.8 6.6 7.0 9.2 9.1 9.3
Rural area population (%) Health data: Footnote 96 13.0 13.6 12.4 14.1 14.7 13.5
Population density (persons per km2) Health data: Footnote 97 97.39 Note ...: not applicable Note ...: not applicable 14.14 Note ...: not applicable Note ...: not applicable
Dependency ratio (%) Health data: Footnote 98 56.7 Note ..: not available for a specific reference period Note ..: not available for a specific reference period 57.8 Note ..: not available for a specific reference period Note ..: not available for a specific reference period
Youth, under 20 years, as a proportion of total population (%) 23.3 Note ..: not available for a specific reference period Note ..: not available for a specific reference period 24.0 Note ..: not available for a specific reference period Note ..: not available for a specific reference period
Seniors, 65 years and over, as a proportion of total population (%) 12.9 Note ..: not available for a specific reference period Note ..: not available for a specific reference period 12.7 Note ..: not available for a specific reference period Note ..: not available for a specific reference period
Aboriginal population (%) Health data: Footnote 99 1.4 1.4 1.5 2.4 2.3 2.4
Immigrant population (%) Health data: Footnote 100 33.2 32.1 34.2 28.5 27.6 29.4
1 year internal migrants (%) Health data: Footnote 101 3.6 3.7 3.6 3.8 3.8 3.8
5 year internal migrants (%) Health data: Footnote 102 12.1 12.2 12.0 12.7 12.7 12.7
Population living within a Metropolitan Influenced Zone (%) Health data: Footnote 103 97.5 97.5 97.6 93.7 93.6 93.8
Lone-parent families (%) Health data: Footnote 104 18.8 3.5 15.2 16.7 3.3 13.5
Visible minority population (%) Health data: Footnote 105 37.2 36.7 37.8 25.9 25.6 26.2
Health System  
Contact with a medical doctor in the past 12 months (%) Health data: Footnote 106 Note ..: not available for a specific reference period Note ..: not available for a specific reference period Note ..: not available for a specific reference period Note ..: not available for a specific reference period Note ..: not available for a specific reference period Note ..: not available for a specific reference period
Coronary artery bypass graft (per 100,000 population) Health data: Footnote 107 55 92 23 66 110 27
Percutaneous coronary intervention (per 100,000 population) Health data: Footnote 108 171 265 87 171 262 88
Cardiac revascularization (per 100,000 population) Health data: Footnote 109 226 355 110 236 369 115
Hip replacement (per 100,000 population) Health data: Footnote 110 103 99 106 112 106 117
Knee replacement (per 100,000 population) Health data: Footnote 111 190 158 218 192 159 222
Hysterectomy (per 100,000 population) Health data: Footnote 112 309 Note ...: not applicable 309 306 Note ...: not applicable 306
Inflow/outflow ratio - Overall (ratio) Health data: Footnote 113 0.82 Note ...: not applicable Note ...: not applicable Note .: not available for any reference period Note .: not available for any reference period Note .: not available for any reference period
Mental illness hospitalization rate (per 100,000 population) Health data: Footnote 114 400 404 396 442 450 434
Mental illness patient days (per 10,000 population) Health data: Footnote 115 465 481 449 547 561 532
Resources  
Doctors rate - General/family physicians (per 100,000 population) Health data: Footnote 116 73 Note ...: not applicable Note ...: not applicable 95 Note ...: not applicable Note ...: not applicable
Doctors rate - Specialist physicians (per 100,000 population) Health data: Footnote 117 59 Note ...: not applicable Note ...: not applicable 99 Note ...: not applicable Note ...: not applicable

Health data: Symbols

Health data: Symbol legend
Symbol Description
· not available for any reference period
·· not available for a specific reference period
··· not applicable
E use with caution
F too unreliable to be published
x suppressed to meet the confidentiality requirements of the Statistics Act

Health data: Footnotes

Footnote 1

Perceived health, very good or excellent

Source : Canadian Community Health Survey, Statistics Canada, 2011/2012.
CANSIM table no(s).: 105-0502, 105-0592

Population aged 12 and over who reported perceiving their own health status as being either excellent or very good or fair or poor, depending on the indicator. Perceived health refers to the perception of a person's health in general, either by the person himself or herself, or, in the case of proxy response, by the person responding. Health means not only the absence of disease or injury but also physical, mental and social well being.

Perceived health is an indicator of overall health status. It can reflect aspects of health not captured in other measures, such as incipient disease, disease severity, physiological and psychological reserves as well as social and mental function. Perceived health refers to a person's health in general — not only the absence of disease or injury, but also physical, mental and social well-being.

Return to health data footnote 1 referrer

Footnote 3

Perceived mental health, very good or excellent

Source : Canadian Community Health Survey, Statistics Canada, 2011/2012.
CANSIM table no(s).: 105-0502, 105-0592

Population aged 12 and over who reported perceiving their own mental health status as being excellent or very good or fair or poor, depending on the indicator. Perceived mental health refers to the perception of a person's mental health in general. Perceived mental health provides a general indication of the population suffering from some form of mental disorder, mental or emotional problems, or distress, not necessarily reflected in perceived health.

Return to health data footnote 3 referrer

Footnote 5

Perceived life stress

Source : Canadian Community Health Survey, Statistics Canada, 2011/2012.
CANSIM table no(s).: 105-0502, 105-0592

Population aged 15 and over who reported perceiving that most days in their life were quite a bit or extremely stressful. Perceived life stress refers to the amount of stress in the person's life, on most days, as perceived by the person or, in the case of proxy response, by the person responding.

Stress carries several negative health consequences, including heart disease, stroke, high blood pressure, as well as immune and circulatory complications.1 Exposure to stress can also contribute to behaviours such as smoking, over-consumption of alcohol, and less-healthy eating habits.

Return to health data footnote 5 referrer

Footnote 6

Overweight or obese

Source : Canadian Community Health Survey, Statistics Canada, 2011/2012.
CANSIM table no(s).: 105-0502, 105-0592

Body mass index (BMI) is a method of classifying body weight according to health risk. According to the World Health Organization (WHO) and Health Canada guidelines, health risk levels are associated with each of the following BMI categories:

  • normal weight = least health risk;
  • underweight and overweight = increased health risk;
  • obese, class I = high health risk;
  • obese, class II = very high health risk;
  • obese, class III = extremely high health risk.

Body mass index (BMI) is calculated by dividing the respondent's body weight (in kilograms) by their height (in metres) squared.

A definition change was implemented in 2004 to conform with the World Health Organization (WHO) and Health Canada guidelines for body weight classification. The index is calculated for the population aged 18 and over, excluding pregnant females and persons less than 3 feet (0.914 metres) tall or greater than 6 feet 11 inches (2.108 metres).

According to the World Health Organization (WHO) and Health Canada guidelines, the index for body weight classification is:

  • less than 18.50 (underweight);
  • 18.50 to 24.99 (normal weight);
  • 25.00 to 29.99 (overweight);
  • 30.00 to 34.99 (obese, class I);
  • 35.00 to 39.99 (obese, class II);
  • 40.00 or greater (obese, class III).

Obesity has been linked with many chronic diseases, including hypertension, type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, osteoarthritis and certain types of cancer.

Return to health data footnote 6 referrer

Footnote 7

Overweight

Source : Canadian Community Health Survey, Statistics Canada, 2011/2012.
CANSIM table no(s).: 105-0502, 105-0592

Body mass index (BMI) is a method of classifying body weight according to health risk. According to the World Health Organization (WHO) and Health Canada guidelines, health risk levels are associated with each of the following BMI categories:

  • normal weight = least health risk;
  • underweight and overweight = increased health risk;
  • obese, class I = high health risk;
  • obese, class II = very high health risk;
  • obese, class III = extremely high health risk.

Body mass index (BMI) is calculated by dividing the respondent's body weight (in kilograms) by their height (in metres) squared.

A definition change was implemented in 2004 to conform with the World Health Organization (WHO) and Health Canada guidelines for body weight classification. The index is calculated for the population aged 18 and over, excluding pregnant females and persons less than 3 feet (0.914 metres) tall or greater than 6 feet 11 inches (2.108 metres).

According to the World Health Organization (WHO) and Health Canada guidelines, the index for body weight classification is:

  • less than 18.50 (underweight);
  • 18.50 to 24.99 (normal weight);
  • 25.00 to 29.99 (overweight);
  • 30.00 to 34.99 (obese, class I);
  • 35.00 to 39.99 (obese, class II);
  • 40.00 or greater (obese, class III).

Return to health data footnote 7 referrer

Footnote 8

Obese

Source : Canadian Community Health Survey, Statistics Canada, 2011/2012.
CANSIM table no(s).: 105-0502, 105-0592

Body mass index (BMI) is a method of classifying body weight according to health risk. According to the World Health Organization (WHO) and Health Canada guidelines, health risk levels are associated with each of the following BMI categories:

  • normal weight = least health risk;
  • underweight and overweight = increased health risk;
  • obese, class I = high health risk;
  • obese, class II = very high health risk;
  • obese, class III = extremely high health risk.

Body mass index (BMI) is calculated by dividing the respondent's body weight (in kilograms) by their height (in metres) squared.

A definition change was implemented in 2004 to conform with the World Health Organization (WHO) and Health Canada guidelines for body weight classification. The index is calculated for the population aged 18 and over, excluding pregnant females and persons less than 3 feet (0.914 metres) tall or greater than 6 feet 11 inches (2.108 metres).

According to the World Health Organization (WHO) and Health Canada guidelines, the index for body weight classification is:

  • less than 18.50 (underweight);
  • 18.50 to 24.99 (normal weight);
  • 25.00 to 29.99 (overweight);
  • 30.00 to 34.99 (obese, class I);
  • 35.00 to 39.99 (obese, class II);
  • 40.00 or greater (obese, class III).

Obesity has been linked with many chronic diseases, including hypertension, type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, osteoarthritis and certain types of cancer.

Return to health data footnote 8 referrer

Footnote 10

Arthritis

Source : Canadian Community Health Survey, Statistics Canada, 2011/2012.
CANSIM table no(s).: 105-0502, 105-0592

Population aged 15 and over who reported that they have been diagnosed by a health professional as having arthritis. Prior to 2009-2010, data for this indicator covered population aged 12 and over.

Arthritis includes rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis, but excludes fibromyalgia.

The term 'arthritis' describes many conditions that affect joints, the tissue surrounding joints, and other connective tissue. The most common types are osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis. The resulting pain, stiffness, swelling and/or deformity of the joints can substantially reduce quality of life.

Return to health data footnote 10 referrer

Footnote 11

Diabetes

Source : Canadian Community Health Survey, Statistics Canada, 2011/2012.
CANSIM table no(s).: 105-0502, 105-0592

Population aged 12 and over who reported that they have been diagnosed by a health professional as having diabetes.

Diabetes includes females 15 and over who reported that they have been diagnosed with gestational diabetes.

Diabetes occurs when the body does not produce enough insulin, or when the insulin produced is not used effectively. Diabetes may lead to a reduced quality of life as well as complications such as heart disease, stroke and kidney disease.

Return to health data footnote 11 referrer

Footnote 12

Asthma

Source : Canadian Community Health Survey, Statistics Canada, 2011/2012.
CANSIM table no(s).: 105-0502, 105-0592

Population aged 12 and over who reported that they have been diagnosed by a health professional as having asthma.

Asthma is a chronic inflammatory disorder of the airways that causes coughing, shortness of breath, chest tightness and wheezing. Quality of life can be affected not only by asthma attacks, but also by absences from work and limitations in other activities.

Return to health data footnote 12 referrer

Footnote 13

High blood pressure

Source : Canadian Community Health Survey, Statistics Canada, 2011/2012.
CANSIM table no(s).: 105-0502, 105-0592

Population aged 12 and over who reported that they have been diagnosed by a health professional as having high blood pressure.

High blood pressure, also known as hypertension, increases the risk of stroke, heart attack and kidney failure. It can narrow and block arteries, as well as strain and weaken the body's organs.

Return to health data footnote 13 referrer

Footnote 14

Mood disorder

Source : Canadian Community Health Survey, Statistics Canada, 2011/2012.
CANSIM table no(s).: 105-0502, 105-0592

Population aged 12 and over who reported that they have been diagnosed by a health professional as having a mood disorder, such as depression, bipolar disorder, mania or dysthymia.

Return to health data footnote 14 referrer

Footnote 15

Pain or discomfort, moderate or severe

Source : Canadian Community Health Survey, Statistics Canada, 2011/2012.
CANSIM table no(s).: 105-0502, 105-0592

Population aged 12 and over who reported that they usually have pain or discomfort.

Return to health data footnote 15 referrer

Footnote 16

Pain or discomfort that prevents activities

Source : Canadian Community Health Survey, Statistics Canada, 2011/2012.
CANSIM table no(s).: 105-0502, 105-0592

Population aged 12 and over who reported having pain or discomfort that prevents activities.

Return to health data footnote 16 referrer

Footnote 17

Low birth weight

Source : Statistics Canada, Vital Statistics, Birth Database, 2005/2007.
CANSIM table no(s).: 102-4303, 102-4304

Live births less than 2,500 grams, expressed as a percentage of all live births (birth weight known).

Counts and rates (percentages) in this table are based on three consecutive years of data which were summed and divided by three. Counts have been rounded and do not always add to the exact totals.

The reference period associated with these data reflects the mid-point of the three-year period.

Return to health data footnote 17 referrer

Footnote 18

Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD)

Source : Canadian Community Health Survey, Statistics Canada, 2011/2012.
CANSIM table no(s).: 105-0502, 105-0592

Population aged 35 and over who reported being diagnosed by a health professional with chronic bronchitis, emphysema or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD).

Return to health data footnote 18 referrer

Footnote 19

Injuries within the past 12 months causing limitation of normal activities

Source : Canadian Community Health Survey, Statistics Canada, 2011/2012.
CANSIM table no(s).: 105-0502, 105-0592

Population aged 12 and over who sustained injuries in the past 12 months. Repetitive strain injuries are not included. Refers to injuries which are serious enough to limit normal activities. For those with more than one injury in the past 12 months, refers to "the most serious injury", as identified by the respondent.

Return to health data footnote 19 referrer

Footnote 20

Injuries in the past 12 months, sought medical attention

Source : Canadian Community Health Survey, Statistics Canada, 2011/2012.
CANSIM table no(s).: 105-0502

Population aged 12 and over who sustained injuries in the past 12 months and who sought medical attention from a health professional in the 48 hours following the injury.

Return to health data footnote 20 referrer

Footnote 21

Hospitalized stroke event rate

Source : Discharge Abstract Database (DAD), CIHI, April 1, 2011 to March 31, 2012.
Related data: Hospitalized stroke event rate

Age-standardized rate of new stroke events admitted to an acute care hospital per 100,000 population age 20 and older. New event is defined as a first-ever hospitalization for stroke or a recurrent hospitalized stroke occurring more than 28 days after the admission for the previous event in the reference period.

Stroke is one of the leading causes of long-term disability and death. Measuring its occurrence in the population is important for planning and evaluating of preventive strategies, allocating health resources and estimating costs. From a disease surveillance perspective, there are three groups of strokes: fatal events occurring out of the hospital, non-fatal stokes managed outside acute care hospitals and those admitted to an acute care facility. Although strokes admitted to a hospital do not reflect all stroke events in the community, this information provides a useful and timely estimate of the disease occurrence in the population.

Refer to the technical notes for more details.

CIHI: Canadian Institute for Health Information

Return to health data footnote 21 referrer

Footnote 22

Hospitalized acute myocardial infarction (AMI) event rate

Source : Discharge Abstract Database (DAD); Fichier des hospitalisations MED-ÉCHO, ministère de la Santé et des Services sociaux, CIHI, April 1, 2011 to March 31, 2012.
Related data: Hospitalized acute myocardial infarction (AMI) event rate

Age-standardized rate of new AMI events admitted to an acute care hospital per 100,000 population age 20 and older. New event is defined as a first-ever hospitalization for an AMI or a recurrent hospitalized AMI occurring more than 28 days after the admission for the previous event in the reference period.

AMI is one of the leading causes of morbidity and death. Measuring its occurrence in the population is important for planning and evaluating preventive strategies, allocating health resources and estimating costs. From a disease surveillance perspective, there are three groups of AMI events: non-diagnosed events, fatal events occurring outside the hospital and those admitted to acute care hospitals. Although AMIs admitted to a hospital do not reflect all acute myocardial infarctions in the community, this information provides a useful and timely estimate of the disease occurrence in the population.

Refer to the technical notes for more details.

CIHI: Canadian Institute for Health Information

Return to health data footnote 22 referrer

Footnote 23

Injury hospitalization rate

Source : National Trauma Registry (NTR), CIHI; Fichier des hospitalisations MED-ÉCHO, Ministère de la Santé et des Services sociaux, April 1, 2011 to March 31, 2012.
Related data: Injury hospitalization rate

Age-standardized rate of acute care hospitalization due to injury resulting from the transfer of energy (excluding poisoning and other non-traumatic injuries), per 100,000 population.

This indicator contributes to an understanding of the adequacy and effectiveness of injury prevention efforts, including public education, product development and use, community and road design, and prevention and treatment resources.

Refer to the technical notes for more details.

CIHI: Canadian Institute for Health Information

Return to health data footnote 23 referrer

Footnote 24

Cancer incidence

Source : Statistics Canada, Canadian Cancer Registry (CCR) Database and Demography Division (population estimates) 2005/2007.
CANSIM table no(s).: 103-0404, 103-0405

Cancer incidence refers to new primary sites of malignant neoplasms.

World Health Organization, International Classification of Diseases for Oncology, Third Edition (ICD-O-3) and the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) rules for determining multiple primaries sites.  [C00-C97].

Return to health data footnote 24 referrer

Footnote 25

Colon cancer incidence

Source : Statistics Canada, Canadian Cancer Registry (CCR) Database and Demography Division (population estimates) 2005/2007.
CANSIM table no(s).: 103-0404, 103-0405

Cancer incidence refers to new primary sites of malignant neoplasms.

World Health Organization, International Classification of Diseases for Oncology, Third Edition (ICD-O-3) and the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) rules for determining multiple primaries sites. [C18.0-C18.9, C26.0]

Return to health data footnote 25 referrer

Footnote 26

Lung cancer incidence

Source : Statistics Canada, Canadian Cancer Registry (CCR) Database and Demography Division (population estimates) 2005/2007.
CANSIM table no(s).: 103-0404, 103-0405

Cancer incidence refers to new primary sites of malignant neoplasms.

World Health Organization, International Classification of Diseases for Oncology, Third Edition (ICD-O-3) and the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) rules for determining multiple primaries sites.  [C34.0-C34.9]

Return to health data footnote 26 referrer

Footnote 27

Breast cancer incidence

Source : Statistics Canada, Canadian Cancer Registry (CCR) Database and Demography Division (population estimates) 2005/2007.
CANSIM table no(s).: 103-0404, 103-0405

Cancer incidence refers to new primary sites of malignant neoplasms.

World Health Organization, International Classification of Diseases for Oncology, Third Edition (ICD-O-3) and the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) rules for determining multiple primaries sites. [C50.0-C50.9]

Return to health data footnote 27 referrer

Footnote 28

Prostate cancer incidence

Source : Statistics Canada, Canadian Cancer Registry (CCR) Database and Demography Division (population estimates) 2005/2007.
CANSIM table no(s).: 103-0404, 103-0405

Cancer incidence refers to new primary sites of malignant neoplasms.

World Health Organization, International Classification of Diseases for Oncology, Third Edition (ICD-O-3) and the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) rules for determining multiple primaries sites. [C61.9]

Return to health data footnote 28 referrer

Footnote 29

Current smoker, daily or occasional

Source : Canadian Community Health Survey, Statistics Canada, 2011/2012.
CANSIM table no(s).: 105-0502, 105-0592

Population aged 12 and over who reported being a current smoker.

Daily smokers refers to those who reported smoking cigarettes every day.

Does not take into account the number of cigarettes smoked.

Occasional smokers refers to those who reported smoking cigarettes occasionally. This includes former daily smokers who now smoke occasionally.

Smoking is a risk factor for lung cancer, heart disease, stroke, chronic respiratory disease, and other conditions1. According to the World Health Organization, smoking is an important and preventable cause of death.

Return to health data footnote 29 referrer

Footnote 30

Current smoker, daily

Source : Canadian Community Health Survey, Statistics Canada, 2011/2012.
CANSIM table no(s).: 105-0502, 105-0592

Population aged 12 and over who reported being a current smoker.

Daily smokers refers to those who reported smoking cigarettes every day.

Does not take into account the number of cigarettes smoked.

Smoking is a risk factor for lung cancer, heart disease, stroke, chronic respiratory disease, and other conditions.1 According to the World Health Organization, smoking is an important and preventable cause of death.

Return to health data footnote 30 referrer

Footnote 31

Heavy drinking

Source : Canadian Community Health Survey, Statistics Canada, 2011/2012.
CANSIM table no(s).: 105-0502, 105-0592

Population aged 12 and over who reported having 5 or more drinks on one occasion, at least once a month in the past year.

Heavy drinking refers to having consumed five or more drinks, per occasion, at least once a month during the past year. This level of alcohol consumption can have serious health and social consequences, especially when combined with other behaviours such as driving while intoxicated.

Return to health data footnote 31 referrer

Footnote 32

Leisure-time physical activity, moderately active or active

Source : Canadian Community Health Survey, Statistics Canada, 2011/2012.
CANSIM table no(s).: 105-0502, 105-0592

Population aged 12 and over who reported a level of physical activity, based on their responses to questions about the nature, frequency and duration of their participation in leisure-time physical activity.

Respondents are classified as active, moderately active or inactive based on an index of average daily physical activity over the past 3 months. For each leisure time physical activity engaged in by the respondent, an average daily energy expenditure is calculated by multiplying the number of times the activity was performed by the average duration of the activity by the energy cost (kilocalories per kilogram of body weight per hour) of the activity. The index is calculated as the sum of the average daily energy expenditures of all activities. Respondents are classified as follows:

  • 3.0 kcal/kg/day or more = physically active;
  • 1.5 to 2.9 kcal/kg/day = moderately active;
  • less than 1.5 kcal/kg/day = inactive.

The health benefits of physical activity include a reduced risk of cardiovascular disease, some types of cancer, osteoporosis, diabetes, obesity, high blood pressure, depression, stress and anxiety.

Return to health data footnote 32 referrer

Footnote 34

Fruit and vegetable consumption, 5 times or more per day

Source : Canadian Community Health Survey, Statistics Canada, 2011/2012.
CANSIM table no(s).: 105-0502, 105-0592

Indicates the usual number of times (frequency) per day a person reported eating fruits and vegetables. Measure does not take into account the amount consumed.

Fruit and vegetables are an important source of vitamins, minerals and fibre. A diet rich in fruit and vegetables may reduce the risk of heart disease and some types of cancer.

Return to health data footnote 34 referrer

Footnote 35

Bike helmet use

Source : Canadian Community Health Survey, Statistics Canada, 2011/2012.
CANSIM table no(s).: 105-0502, 105-0592

Population aged 12 and over who reported that they always wore a helmet when riding a bicycle in the last 12 months.

Return to health data footnote 35 referrer

Footnote 36

Participation and activity limitation, sometimes or often

Source : Canadian Community Health Survey, Statistics Canada, 2011/2012.
CANSIM table no(s).: 105-0502, 105-0592

Population aged 12 and over who reported being limited in selected activities (home, school, work and other activities) because of a physical condition, mental condition or health problem which has lasted or is expected to last 6 months or longer.

Return to health data footnote 36 referrer

Footnote 37

Functional health, good to full

Source : Canadian Community Health Survey, Statistics Canada, 2011/2012.
CANSIM table no(s).: 105-0502, 105-0592

Population aged 12 and over reporting measures of overall functional health, based on 8 dimensions of functioning (vision, hearing, speech, mobility, dexterity, feelings, cognition and pain).

A score of 0.8 to 1.0 is considered to be good to full functional health; scores below 0.8 are considered to indicate moderate to poor functional health problems.

Otherwise known as the Health Utility Index (HUI), this index, developed at McMaster University's Centre for Health Economics and Policy Analysis, is based on the Comprehensive Health Status Measurement System (CHSMS).

Return to health data footnote 37 referrer

Footnote 38

Influenza immunization, less than one year ago

Source : Canadian Community Health Survey, Statistics Canada, 2011/2012.
CANSIM table no(s).: 105-0502, 105-0592

Population aged 12 and over who reported when they had their last influenza immunization (flu shot).  The 2009 data on flu shots may include H1N1 vaccines received in the Fall of 2009. In 2010, the word "seasonal" was added to the questions in order to collect the two types of vaccines separately.

Return to health data footnote 38 referrer

Footnote 39

Received mammogram within the last 2 years, females aged 50 to 69 years

Source : Canadian Community Health Survey, Statistics Canada, 2008.
CANSIM table no(s).: 105-0543

Women aged 50 to 69 who reported when they had their last mammogram for routine screening or other reasons.

Screening mammography is an important strategy for early detection of breast cancer.

Return to health data footnote 39 referrer

Footnote 40

Pap smear within the last 3 years, by age group, females aged 18 to 69 years

Source : Canadian Community Health Survey, Statistics Canada, 2005.
CANSIM table no(s).: 105-0442

Women aged 18 to 69 who reported when they had their last Pap smear test.

Pap tests detect pre-malignant lesions before cancer of the cervix develops.

Return to health data footnote 40 referrer

Footnote 41

Regular medical doctor

Source : Canadian Community Health Survey, Statistics Canada, 2011/2012.
CANSIM table no(s).: 105-0502, 105-0592

Population aged 12 and over who reported that they have a regular medical doctor.

For many Canadians, the first point of contact for medical care is their doctor. Being without a regular medical doctor is associated with fewer visits to general practitioners or specialists, who can play a role in the early screening and treatment of medical conditions.

Return to health data footnote 41 referrer

Footnote 42

Wait time for hip fracture surgery (Proportion with surgery within 48 hours)

Source : Discharge Abstract Database (DAD), CIHI, April 1, 2011 to March 31, 2012.
Related data: Wait time for hip fracture surgery (Proportion with surgery within 48 hours)

Proportion with surgery within 48 hours: Risk-adjusted proportion of hip fracture patients age 65 and older who underwent hip fracture surgery within 48 hours of admission to hospital.

Operative delay in older patients with hip fracture is associated with a higher risk of post-operative complications and mortality. Wait time for surgery following hip fracture provides a measure of access to care. The wait time may be influenced by comorbid conditions, hospital transfers and practice differences related to certain types of medications, like blood thinners. However, longer waits may indicate lack of resources, physician unavailability and/or other issues related to access to care.

Rates for Quebec are not available due to differences in data collection. Canada rate does not include Quebec.

Refer to the technical notes for more details.

CIHI: Canadian Institute for Health Information

Return to health data footnote 42 referrer

Footnote 43

Caesarean section

Source : Discharge Abstract Database (DAD), CIHI; Fichier des hospitalisations MED-ÉCHO, ministère de la Santé et des Services sociaux, April 1, 2011 to March 31, 2012.
Related data: Caesarean section

Proportion of women delivering babies in acute care hospitals by caesarean section.

Caesarean section rates provide information on the frequency of surgical birth delivery relative to all modes of birth delivery. Since Caesarean section delivery increases maternal morbidity/mortality and is associated with higher costs, Caesarean section rates are often used to monitor clinical practices with an implicit assumption that lower rates indicate more appropriate, as well as more efficient care.

Refer to the technical notes for more details.

CIHI: Canadian Institute for Health Information

Return to health data footnote 43 referrer

Footnote 44

Patients with repeat hospitalizations for mental illness

Source : Discharge Abstract Database (DAD), Ontario Mental Health Reporting System (OMHRS), CIHI; Fichier des hospitalisations MED-ÉCHO, ministère de la Santé et des Services sociaux du Québec, April 1, 2011 to March 31, 2012.
Related data: Patients with repeat hospitalizations for mental illness

Risk-adjusted percentage of individuals that had three or more episodes of care for a selected mental illness1 over all those who had at least one episode of care for a selected mental illness in general hospitals within a given year. An episode of care refers to all contiguous hospitalizations and same-day surgery visits in general hospitals.

This indicator is considered an indirect measure of appropriateness of care, since the need for frequent admission to hospital depends on the person and the type of illness. Challenges in getting appropriate care/support in the community and/or the appropriate medication often lead to frequent hospitalizations. Variations in this indicator across jurisdictions may reflect differences in the services that help individuals with mental illness remain in the community for a longer period of time without the need for hospitalization.

This indicator may help to identify a population of frequent users, and further investigations could provide a description of the characteristics of this group. Understanding this population can aid in developing/enhancing programs that may prevent the need for frequent rehospitalization.

1The mental illnesses selected for this indicator are substance-related disorders; schizophrenia, delusional and non-organic psychotic disorders; mood/affective disorders; anxiety disorders; and selected disorders of adult personality and behaviour.

Refer to the technical notes for more details.

CIHI: Canadian Institute for Health Information

Return to health data footnote 44 referrer

Footnote 45

Ambulatory care sensitive conditions

Source : Discharge Abstract Database (DAD), CIHI; Fichier des hospitalisations MED-ÉCHO, ministère de la Santé et des Services sociaux, April 1, 2011 to March 31, 2012.
Related data: Ambulatory care sensitive conditions

Age-standardized acute care hospitalization rate for conditions where appropriate ambulatory care prevents or reduces the need for admission to hospital, per 100,000 population under age 75 years.

Ambulatory care sensitive conditions have been considered to be a measure of access to appropriate primary health care. While not all admissions for ambulatory care sensitive conditions are avoidable, it is assumed that appropriate prior ambulatory care could prevent the onset of this type of illness or condition, control an acute episodic illness or condition, or manage a chronic disease or condition. A disproportionately high rate is presumed to reflect problems in obtaining access to primary care.

Refer to the technical notes for more details.

CIHI: Canadian Institute for Health Information

Return to health data footnote 45 referrer

Footnote 46

30-day acute myocardial infarction (AMI) in-hospital mortality

Source : Discharge Abstract Database (DAD), CIHI. Rates are based on the 3 years of pooled data: April 1, 2009 - March 31, 2012.
Related data: 30-day acute myocardial infarction (AMI) in-hospital mortality rate

The risk-adjusted rate of all-cause in-hospital death occurring within 30 days of first admission to an acute care hospital with a diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction (AMI).

To enable comparison across regions, a statistical model was used to adjust for differences in age, sex and co-morbidities. Adjusted mortality rates following AMI may reflect, for example, the underlying effectiveness of treatment and quality of care. Inter-regional variation in 30 day in hospital mortality rates may be due to jurisdictional and institutional differences in standards of care, as well as other factors that were not included in the adjustment.

Rates for Quebec are not available due to differences in data collection. Canada rate does not include Quebec.

Refer to the technical notes for more details.

CIHI: Canadian Institute for Health Information

Return to health data footnote 46 referrer

Footnote 47

30-day stroke in-hospital mortality

Source : Discharge Abstract Database (DAD), CIHI. Rates are based on the 3 years of pooled data: April 1, 2009 - March 31, 2012.
Related data: 30-day stroke in-hospital mortality rate

The risk-adjusted rate of all-cause in-hospital death occurring within 30 days of first admission to an acute care hospital with a diagnosis of stroke.

To enable comparison across regions, a statistical model was used to adjust for differences in age, sex and co-morbidities. Adjusted mortality rates following stroke may reflect, for example, the underlying effectiveness of treatment and quality of care. Inter-regional variations in rates may be due to jurisdictional and institutional differences in standards of care, as well as other factors that are not included in the adjustment.

Rates for Quebec are not available due to differences in data collection. Canada rate does not include Quebec.

Refer to the technical notes for more details.

CIHI: Canadian Institute for Health Information

Return to health data footnote 47 referrer

Footnote 48

Self-injury hospitalization rate

Source : Discharge Abstract Database (DAD), OMHRS, NACRS, CIHI; Fichier des hospitalisations MED-ÉCHO, ministère de la Santé et des Services sociaux du Québec, April 1, 2011 to March 31, 2012.
Related data: Self-injury hospitalization rate

Age-standardized rate of hospitalization in a general hospital due to self-injury per 100,000 population.

Self-injury is defined as a deliberate bodily injury that may or may not result in death. This type of injury is the result of either suicidal or self-harming behaviours, or both. Self-injury can be prevented, in many cases, by early recognition, intervention and treatment of mental illnesses. While some risk factors for self-injury are beyond the control of the health system, high rates of self-injury hospitalization can be interpreted as the result of a failure of the system to prevent self-injuries that are severe enough to require hospitalizations.

Refer to the technical notes for more details.

CIHI: Canadian Institute for Health Information

OMHRS: Ontario Mental Health Reporting System

NACRS: National Ambulatory Care Reporting System

Return to health data footnote 48 referrer

Footnote 49

30-day obstetric readmission rate

Source : Discharge Abstract Database (DAD), National Ambulatory Care Reporting System (NACRS), CIHI; Fichier des hospitalisations MED-ÉCHO, ministère de la Santé et des Services sociaux du Québec; April 1, 2011 to March 31, 2012.
Related data: 30-day obstetric readmission rate

Risk-adjusted rate of unplanned readmission for obstetric patients. 

Non-elective return to an acute care hospital for any cause is counted as a readmission if it occurs within 30 days of the index episode of inpatient care. An episode of care refers to all contiguous inpatient hospitalizations and same-day surgery visits.

Return to health data footnote 49 referrer

Footnote 50

30-day readmission rate - patients age 19 and younger

Source : Discharge Abstract Database (DAD), National Ambulatory Care Reporting System (NACRS), CIHI; Fichier des hospitalisations MED-ÉCHO, ministère de la Santé et des Services sociaux du Québec; April 1, 2011 to March 31, 2012.
Related data: 30-day readmission rate - patients age 19 and younger

Risk-adjusted rate of unplanned readmission for pediatric patients. 

Non-elective return to an acute care hospital for any cause is counted as a readmission if it occurs within 30 days of the index episode of inpatient care. An episode of care refers to all contiguous inpatient hospitalizations and same-day surgery visits.

Return to health data footnote 50 referrer

Footnote 51

30-day surgical readmission rate

Source : Discharge Abstract Database (DAD), National Ambulatory Care Reporting System (NACRS), CIHI; Fichier des hospitalisations MED-ÉCHO, ministère de la Santé et des Services sociaux du Québec; April 1, 2011 to March 31, 2012.
Related data: 30-day surgical readmission rate

Risk-adjusted rate of unplanned readmission for adult surgical patients.

Non-elective return to an acute care hospital for any cause is counted as a readmission if it occurs within 30 days of the index episode of inpatient care. An episode of care refers to all contiguous inpatient hospitalizations and same-day surgery visits.

Return to health data footnote 51 referrer

Footnote 52

30-day medical readmission rate

Source : Discharge Abstract Database (DAD), National Ambulatory Care Reporting System (NACRS), CIHI; Fichier des hospitalisations MED-ÉCHO, ministère de la Santé et des Services sociaux du Québec; April 1, 2011 to March 31, 2012.
Related data: 30-day medical readmission rate

Risk-adjusted rate of unplanned readmission for adult medical patients.

Non-elective return to an acute care hospital for any cause is counted as a readmission if it occurs within 30 days of the index episode of inpatient care. An episode of care refers to all contiguous inpatient hospitalizations and same-day surgery visits.

Return to health data footnote 52 referrer

Footnote 53

Potentially avoidable mortality

Source : Statistics Canada, Canadian Vital Statistics, Death Database and Demography Division (population estimates), 2006/2008.
CANSIM table no(s).: 102-4311

Age-standardized rate of premature deaths that could potentially have been avoided through all levels of prevention (primary, secondary, tertiary) per 100,000 population. Premature deaths are those of individuals who are younger than age 75.

Return to health data footnote 53 referrer

Footnote 54

Avoidable mortality from preventable causes

Source : Statistics Canada, Canadian Vital Statistics, Death Database and Demography Division (population estimates), 2006/2008.
CANSIM table no(s).: 102-4311

Age-standardized rate of premature deaths that could potentially have been prevented through primary prevention efforts per 100,000 population. Mortality from preventable causes is a subset of potentially avoidable mortality.

Return to health data footnote 54 referrer

Footnote 55

Avoidable mortality from treatable causes

Source : Statistics Canada, Canadian Vital Statistics, Death Database and Demography Division (population estimates), 2006/2008.
CANSIM table no(s).: 102-4311

Age-standardized rate of premature deaths that could potentially have been avoided through secondary or tertiary prevention per 100,000 population. Mortality from treatable causes is a subset of potentially avoidable mortality.

Return to health data footnote 55 referrer

Footnote 56

30-day readmission rate for mental illness

Source : Discharge Abstract Database (DAD), OMHRS, NACRS, CIHI; Fichier des hospitalisations MED-ÉCHO, ministère de la Santé et des Services sociaux du Québec, April 1, 2011 to March 31, 2012.
Related data: 30-day readmission rate for mental illness

Risk-adjusted rate of readmission following discharge for a mental illness. A case is counted as a readmission if it is for a selected mental illness diagnosis1 and if it occurs within 30 days of the index episode of inpatient care. An episode of care refers to all contiguous hospitalizations and same-day surgery visits in general hospitals.

Readmission to inpatient care may be an indicator of relapse or complications after an inpatient stay. Inpatient care for people living with a mental illness aims to stabilize acute symptoms. Once stabilized, the individual is discharged, and subsequent care and support are ideally provided through outpatient and community programs in order to prevent relapse or complications. High rates of 30-day readmission could be interpreted as a direct outcome of poor coordination of services and/or an indirect outcome of poor continuity of services after discharge.

1The mental illnesses selected for this indicator are substance-related disorders; schizophrenia, delusional and non-organic psychotic disorders; mood/affective disorders; anxiety disorders; and selected disorders of adult personality and behaviour.

Refer to the technical notes for more details.

CIHI: Canadian Institute for Health Information

OMHRS: Ontario Mental Health Reporting System

NACRS: National Ambulatory Care Reporting System

Return to health data footnote 56 referrer

Footnote 57

Hospitalized hip fracture event rate

Source : Discharge Abstract Database (DAD), CIHI; Fichier des hospitalisations MED-ÉCHO, ministère de la Santé et des Services sociaux, April 1, 2011 to March 31, 2012.
Related data: Hospitalized hip fracture event rate

Age-standardized rate of new hip fractures admitted to an acute care hospital per 100,000 population age 65 years and over. New event is defined as a first-ever hospitalization for hip fracture or a subsequent hip fracture occurring more than 28 days after the admission for the previous event in the reference period. A person may have more than one hip fracture event in the reference period.

Hip fractures represent a significant health burden for seniors and for the health system. As well as causing disability or death, hip fracture may have a major effect on independence and quality of life. Measuring occurrence of hip fractures in the population is important for planning and evaluating preventive strategies, allocating health resources and estimating costs.

Refer to the technical notes for more details.

CIHI: Canadian Institute for Health Information

Return to health data footnote 57 referrer

Footnote 58

Exposure to second-hand smoke at home

Source : Canadian Community Health Survey, Statistics Canada, 2011/2012.
CANSIM table no(s).: 105-0502, 105-0592

Non-smoking population aged 12 and over who reported that at least one person smoked inside their home every day or almost every day.

Smoking includes cigarettes, cigars and pipes.

'Passive smoking,' or exposure to second-hand smoke, has negative respiratory health effects. Two of the most common associated diseases are lung cancer in adults and asthma among children.

Return to health data footnote 58 referrer

Footnote 59

Exposure to second-hand smoke in the past month, in vehicles and/or public places

Source : Canadian Community Health Survey, Statistics Canada, 2011/2012.
CANSIM table no(s).: 105-0502, 105-0592

Non-smoking population aged 12 and over who reported being exposed to second-hand smoke in private vehicles and/or public places on every day or almost every day in the past month.

Smoking includes cigarettes, cigars and pipes.

'Passive smoking,' or exposure to second-hand smoke, has negative respiratory health effects. Two of the most common associated diseases are lung cancer in adults and asthma among children.

Return to health data footnote 59 referrer

Footnote 62

Infant mortality

Source : Statistics Canada, Vital Statistics, Birth and Death Databases, 2005/2007.
CANSIM table no(s).: 102-4305, 102-4306

Infant mortality corresponds to the death of a child under one year of age. Expressed as a rate per 1,000 live births.

A long-established measure, not only of child health, but also of the well-being of a society. This indicator reflects the level of mortality, health status, and health care of a population, and the effectiveness of preventive care and the attention paid to maternal and child health.

Return to health data footnote 62 referrer

Footnote 63

Life expectancy at birth

Source : Statistics Canada, Canadian Vital Statistics, Death Database and Demography Division (population estimates), 2007/2009.
CANSIM table no(s).: 102-4307

Life expectancy is the number of years a person would be expected to live, starting from birth (for life expectancy at birth) or at age 65 (for life expectancy at age 65), on the basis of the mortality statistics for a given observation period.

A widely used indicator of the health of a population. Life expectancy measures quantity rather than quality of life.

For small populations (less than 25,000), life expectancy is shown with an 'E' (use with caution) to indicate that the quality of the estimates are more affected by the imputation method used when there are no deaths for a given age group.

Return to health data footnote 63 referrer

Footnote 64

Life expectancy at age 65

Source : Statistics Canada, Canadian Vital Statistics, Death Database and Demography Division (population estimates), 2007/2009.
CANSIM table no(s).: 102-4307

Life expectancy is the number of years a person would be expected to live, starting from birth (for life expectancy at birth) or at age 65 (for life expectancy at age 65), on the basis of the mortality statistics for a given observation period.

A widely used indicator of the health of a population. Life expectancy measures quantity rather than quality of life.

For small populations (less than 25,000), life expectancy is shown with an 'E' (use with caution) to indicate that the quality of the estimates are more affected by the imputation method used when there are no deaths for a given age group.

Return to health data footnote 64 referrer

Footnote 65

Total, all causes of death

Source : Statistics Canada, Canadian Vital Statistics, Death Database and Demography Division (population estimates), 2005/2007.
CANSIM table no(s).: 102-4309, 102-4310

Age-standardized rate of death from all causes per 100,000 population.

World Health Organization (WHO), International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems, Tenth Revision (ICD-10). All causes of death [A00-Y89].

Return to health data footnote 65 referrer

Footnote 66

All cancers, deaths

Source : Statistics Canada, Canadian Vital Statistics, Death Database and Demography Division (population estimates), 2005/2007.
CANSIM table no(s).: 102-4309, 102-4310

Age-standardized rate of death per 100,000 population.

World Health Organization (WHO), International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems, Tenth Revision (ICD-10). All malignant neoplasms (cancers) [C00-C97].

Return to health data footnote 66 referrer

Footnote 67

Colorectal cancer, deaths

Source : Statistics Canada, Canadian Vital Statistics, Death Database and Demography Division (population estimates), 2005/2007.
CANSIM table no(s).: 102-4309, 102-4310

Age-standardized rate of death per 100,000 population.

World Health Organization (WHO), International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems, Tenth Revision (ICD-10). Colorectal cancer [C18-C21].

Return to health data footnote 67 referrer

Footnote 68

Lung cancer, deaths

Source : Statistics Canada, Canadian Vital Statistics, Death Database and Demography Division (population estimates), 2005/2007.
CANSIM table no(s).: 102-4309, 102-4310

Age-standardized rate of death per 100,000 population.

World Health Organization (WHO), International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems, Tenth Revision (ICD-10). Lung cancer [C33-C34].

Return to health data footnote 68 referrer

Footnote 69

Breast cancer, deaths

Source : Statistics Canada, Canadian Vital Statistics, Death Database and Demography Division (population estimates), 2005/2007.
CANSIM table no(s).: 102-4309, 102-4310

Age-standardized rate of death per 100,000 population.

World Health Organization (WHO), International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems, Tenth Revision (ICD-10). Breast cancer [C50].

Rates for breast cancer (International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems, Tenth Revision (ICD-10) code C50) were calculated for females only.

Return to health data footnote 69 referrer

Footnote 70

Prostate cancer, deaths

Source : Statistics Canada, Canadian Vital Statistics, Death Database and Demography Division (population estimates), 2005/2007.
CANSIM table no(s).: 102-4309, 102-4310

Age-standardized rate of death per 100,000 population.

World Health Organization (WHO), International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems, Tenth Revision (ICD-10). Prostate cancer [C61].

Rates for prostate cancer (International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems, Tenth Revision (ICD-10) code C61) were calculated for males only.

Return to health data footnote 70 referrer

Footnote 71

Circulatory diseases, deaths

Source : Statistics Canada, Canadian Vital Statistics, Death Database and Demography Division (population estimates), 2005/2007.
CANSIM table no(s).: 102-4309, 102-4310

Age-standardized rate of death per 100,000 population.

World Health Organization (WHO), International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems, Tenth Revision (ICD-10). Circulatory diseases [I00-I99].

Return to health data footnote 71 referrer

Footnote 72

Ischaemic heart diseases, deaths

Source : Statistics Canada, Canadian Vital Statistics, Death Database and Demography Division (population estimates), 2005/2007.
CANSIM table no(s).: 102-4309, 102-4310

Age-standardized rate of death per 100,000 population.

World Health Organization (WHO), International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems, Tenth Revision (ICD-10). Ischaemic heart diseases [I20-I25].

Return to health data footnote 72 referrer

Footnote 73

Cerebrovascular diseases, deaths

Source : Statistics Canada, Canadian Vital Statistics, Death Database and Demography Division (population estimates), 2005/2007.
CANSIM table no(s).: 102-4309, 102-4310

Age-standardized rate of death per 100,000 population.

World Health Organization (WHO), International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems, Tenth Revision (ICD-10). Cerebrovascular diseases [I60-I69].

Return to health data footnote 73 referrer

Footnote 74

All other circulatory diseases, deaths

Source : Statistics Canada, Canadian Vital Statistics, Death Database and Demography Division (population estimates), 2005/2007.
CANSIM table no(s).: 102-4309, 102-4310

Age-standardized rate of death per 100,000 population.

World Health Organization (WHO), International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems, Tenth Revision (ICD-10). All other circulatory diseases [I00-I02, I05-I09, I10-I15, I26-I28, I30-I52, I70-I79, I80-I89, I95-I99].

Return to health data footnote 74 referrer

Footnote 75

Respiratory diseases, deaths

Source : Statistics Canada, Canadian Vital Statistics, Death Database and Demography Division (population estimates), 2005/2007.
CANSIM table no(s).: 102-4309, 102-4310

Age-standardized rate of death per 100,000 population.

World Health Organization (WHO), International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems, Tenth Revision (ICD-10). Respiratory diseases (excluding infectious and parasitic diseases) [J00-J99].

Return to health data footnote 75 referrer

Footnote 76

Pneumonia and influenza, deaths

Source : Statistics Canada, Canadian Vital Statistics, Death Database and Demography Division (population estimates), 2005/2007.
CANSIM table no(s).: 102-4309, 102-4310

Age-standardized rate of death per 100,000 population.

World Health Organization (WHO), International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems, Tenth Revision (ICD-10). Pneumonia and influenza [J10-J18].

Return to health data footnote 76 referrer

Footnote 77

Bronchitis, emphysema and asthma, deaths

Source : Statistics Canada, Canadian Vital Statistics, Death Database and Demography Division (population estimates), 2005/2007.
CANSIM table no(s).: 102-4309, 102-4310

Age-standardized rate of death per 100,000 population.

World Health Organization (WHO), International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems, Tenth Revision (ICD-10). Bronchitis, emphysema and asthma [J40-J43, J45-J46].

Return to health data footnote 77 referrer

Footnote 78

All other respiratory diseases, deaths

Source : Statistics Canada, Canadian Vital Statistics, Death Database and Demography Division (population estimates), 2005/2007.
CANSIM table no(s).: 102-4309, 102-4310

Age-standardized rate of death per 100,000 population.

World Health Organization (WHO), International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems, Tenth Revision (ICD-10). All other respiratory diseases [J00-J06, J20-J22, J30-J39, J44, J47, J60-J70, J80-J84, J85-J86, J90-J94, J95-J99].

Return to health data footnote 78 referrer

Footnote 79

Unintentional injuries, deaths

Source : Statistics Canada, Canadian Vital Statistics, Death Database and Demography Division (population estimates), 2005/2007.
CANSIM table no(s).: 102-4309, 102-4310

Age-standardized rate of death per 100,000 population.

World Health Organization (WHO), International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems, Tenth Revision (ICD-10). Unintentional injuries [V01-X59, Y85-Y86].

External causes of unintentional injuries include transport accidents, falls, poisoning, drowning and fires, but not complications of medical and surgical care (International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems, Tenth Revision (ICD-10) codes V01 to X59, Y85 to Y86).

Return to health data footnote 79 referrer

Footnote 80

Suicides and self-inflicted injuries, deaths

Source : Statistics Canada, Canadian Vital Statistics, Death Database and Demography Division (population estimates), 2005/2007.
CANSIM table no(s).: 102-4309, 102-4310

Age-standardized rate of death per 100,000 population.

World Health Organization (WHO), International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems, Tenth Revision (ICD-10). Suicides and self-inflicted injuries [X60-X84, Y87.0].

Return to health data footnote 80 referrer

Footnote 81

Human immunodeficiency virus [HIV] disease, deaths

Source : Statistics Canada, Canadian Vital Statistics, Death Database and Demography Division (population estimates), 2005/2007.
CANSIM table no(s).: 102-4309, 102-4310

Age-standardized rate of death per 100,000 population.

World Health Organization (WHO), International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems, Tenth Revision (ICD-10). Human immunodeficiency virus [HIV] disease [B20-B24].

Return to health data footnote 81 referrer

Footnote 82

Premature mortality

Source : Statistics Canada, Canadian Vital Statistics, Death Database and Demography Division (population estimates), 2006/2008.
CANSIM table no(s).: 102-4311

Age-standardized rate of premature deaths per 100,000 population. Premature deaths are those of individuals who are younger than age 75.

Return to health data footnote 82 referrer

Footnote 83

Sense of community belonging

Source : Canadian Community Health Survey, Statistics Canada, 2011/2012.
CANSIM table no(s).: 105-0502

Population aged 12 and over who reported their sense of belonging to their local community as being very strong or somewhat strong. Research shows a high correlation of sense of community-belonging with physical and mental health.

Return to health data footnote 83 referrer

Footnote 84

Life satisfaction, satisfied or very satisfied

Source : Canadian Community Health Survey, Statistics Canada, 2011/2012.
CANSIM table no(s).: 105-0502

Population aged 12 and over who reported being satisfied or very satisfied with their life in general. Starting in 2009, this indicator is based on a grouped variable. In 2009, the question was changed from 5-point answer category to an 11-point scale. The concordance between the two scales was found to be good.

Return to health data footnote 84 referrer

Footnote 85

High school graduates aged 25 to 29

Source : 2011 National Household Survey, Statistics Canada.
Global non-response rates (GNR): Central East (HR) = 29.6%, Ontario = 27.1%
Related data: Not applicable

Population aged 25 to 29 years in private households who have a secondary school diploma or equivalent.

'High school certificate or equivalent' refers to whether the person has completed a secondary school diploma or the equivalent, no matter what other certificates, diplomas or degrees he or she has.

Examples of high school equivalency certificates are General Educational Development (GED) and Adult Basic Education (ABE).

Return to health data footnote 85 referrer

Footnote 86

Post-secondary graduates aged 25 to 54

Source : 2011 National Household Survey, Statistics Canada.
Global non-response rates (GNR): Central East (HR) = 29.6%, Ontario = 27.1%
Related data: Not applicable

Population aged 25 to 54 years in private households who have a postsecondary certificate, diploma or degree.

Information indicating the person's most advanced certificate, diploma or degree. This is a derived variable obtained from the educational qualifications questions, which asked for all certificates, diplomas and degrees to be reported. The general hierarchy used in deriving this variable (secondary school diploma, trades, college, university) is loosely tied to the 'in-class' duration of the various types of education. At the detailed level, someone who has completed one type of certificate, diploma or degree will not necessarily have completed the credentials listed below it in the hierarchy. For example, a registered apprenticeship graduate may not have completed a high school certificate or diploma, nor does an individual with a master's degree necessarily have a 'certificate or diploma above the bachelor's level.' Although the hierarchy may not fit all programs perfectly, it gives a general measure of educational attainment.

Return to health data footnote 86 referrer

Footnote 87

Adult unemployment, 15 years and over

Source : Labour Force Survey (special tabulations), Statistics Canada, 2011.
CANSIM table no(s).: 109-5324

Proportion of the Labour force aged 15 and over who did not have a job during the reference period.

The labour force consists of people who are currently employed and people who are unemployed but were available to work in the reference period and had looked for work in the past 4 four weeks. The reference period refers to a one-week period (from Sunday to Saturday) that usually includes the 15th day of the month.

The unemployment rate is a traditional measure of the economy. Unemployed people tend to experience more health problems.

Return to health data footnote 87 referrer

Footnote 88

Youth unemployment

Source : Labour Force Survey (special tabulations), Statistics Canada, 2011.
CANSIM table no(s).: 109-5324

Proportion of the Labour force for youths, aged 15 to 24 years, who did not have a job during the reference period.

The labour force consists of people who are currently employed and people who are unemployed but were available to work in the reference period and had looked for work in the past 4 four weeks. The reference period refers to a one-week period (from Sunday to Saturday) that usually includes the 15th day of the month.

The unemployment rate is a traditional measure of the economy. Unemployed people tend to experience more health problems.

Return to health data footnote 88 referrer

Footnote 89

Long-term unemployed

Source : 2011 National Household Survey, Statistics Canada.
Global non-response rates (GNR): Central East (HR) = 29.6%, Ontario = 27.1%
Related data: Not applicable

The long term unemployed includes unemployed persons in private households who last worked in or before 2010.

Return to health data footnote 89 referrer

Footnote 90

Low income rate

Source : 2011 National Household Survey, Statistics Canada.
Global non-response rates (GNR): Central East (HR) = 29.6%, Ontario = 27.1%
Related data: Not applicable

Low-income before-tax cut-offs represent income levels at which families or persons not in economic families spend 20 percentage points more than average of their before tax income on food, shelter and clothing.

Economic family refers to a group of two or more persons who live in the same dwelling and are related to each other by blood, marriage, common-law, adoption or a foster relationship. A couple may be of opposite or same sex.

The economic family concept requires only that family members be related by blood, marriage, common-law, adoption or a foster relationship. By contrast, the census family concept requires that family members be a male or female married spouse, a male or female common-law partner, a male or female lone parent, or a child with a parent present. The concept of economic family may refer to a larger group of persons than does the census family concept. For example, a widowed mother living with her married son and daughter-in-law would be considered as a person not in a census family. That same person would, however, be counted as a member of an economic family along with her son and daughter-in-law. Two or more related census families living together also constitute one economic family as, for example, a husband and his wife living with their married son and daughter-in-law. Two or more adult brothers or sisters living together, apart from their parents, form an economic family, but not a census family. All census family persons are economic family persons.

Persons not in economic families refer to household members who do not belong to an economic family, including persons living alone.

For additional information please refer to the National Household Survey Dictionary (http://www12.statcan.gc.ca/nhs-enm/2011/ref/dict/fam020-eng.cfm).

Return to health data footnote 90 referrer

Footnote 91

Children aged 17 and under living in low income families

Source : 2011 National Household Survey, Statistics Canada.
Global non-response rates (GNR): Central East (HR) = 29.6%, Ontario = 27.1%
Related data: Not applicable

Low-income before-tax cut-offs represent income levels at which families or persons not in economic families spend 20 percentage points more than average of their before tax income on food, shelter and clothing.

Economic family refers to a group of two or more persons who live in the same dwelling and are related to each other by blood, marriage, common-law, adoption or a foster relationship. A couple may be of opposite or same sex.

The economic family concept requires only that family members be related by blood, marriage, common-law, adoption or a foster relationship. By contrast, the census family concept requires that family members be a male or female married spouse, a male or female common-law partner, a male or female lone parent, or a child with a parent present. The concept of economic family may refer to a larger group of persons than does the census family concept. For example, a widowed mother living with her married son and daughter-in-law would be considered as a person not in a census family. That same person would, however, be counted as a member of an economic family along with her son and daughter-in-law. Two or more related census families living together also constitute one economic family as, for example, a husband and his wife living with their married son and daughter-in-law. Two or more adult brothers or sisters living together, apart from their parents, form an economic family, but not a census family. All census family persons are economic family persons.

Age refers to the age at last birthday before the reference date, that is, before May 10, 2011.

For additional information please refer to the National Household Survey Dictionary (http://www12.statcan.gc.ca/nhs-enm/2011/ref/dict/fam020-eng.cfm).

Return to health data footnote 91 referrer

Footnote 92

Total population

Source : 2011 Census, Statistics Canada.
Related data: Not applicable

The number of people living in a geographic area by sex.

A population's size and age/sex composition impact the health status of a region and its need for health services. Population data also provide the 'denominators' used to calculate rates for most health and social indicators.

For more recent estimates of health region population, see CANSIM table no. 109-5325.

Please note that the most appropriate 2011 population figures for Canada, provinces and territories are the current postcensal population estimates.

Return to health data footnote 92 referrer

Footnote 93

Large urban population centre population

Source : 2011 Census, Statistics Canada.
Related data: Not applicable

A population centre has a population of at least 1,000 and a population density of 400 persons or more per square kilometre, based on the current census population count. All areas outside population centres are classified as rural areas.

Taken together, population centres and rural areas cover all of Canada.

Population centres are classified into three groups, depending on the size of their population:

  • small population centres, with a population of between 1,000 and 29,999;
  • medium population centres, with a population of between 30,000 and 99,999
  • large urban population centres, consisting of a population of 100,000 and over.

Rates were calculated on randomly rounded data, and may not necessarily add up to 100%.

Return to health data footnote 93 referrer

Footnote 94

Medium population centre population

Source : 2011 Census, Statistics Canada.
Related data: Not applicable

A population centre has a population of at least 1,000 and a population density of 400 persons or more per square kilometre, based on the current census population count. All areas outside population centres are classified as rural areas.

Taken together, population centres and rural areas cover all of Canada.

Population centres are classified into three groups, depending on the size of their population:

  • small population centres, with a population of between 1,000 and 29,999;
  • medium population centres, with a population of between 30,000 and 99,999
  • large urban population centres, consisting of a population of 100,000 and over.

Rates were calculated on randomly rounded data, and may not necessarily add up to 100%.

Return to health data footnote 94 referrer

Footnote 95

Small population centre population

Source : 2011 Census, Statistics Canada.
Related data: Not applicable

A population centre has a population of at least 1,000 and a population density of 400 persons or more per square kilometre, based on the current census population count. All areas outside population centres are classified as rural areas.

Taken together, population centres and rural areas cover all of Canada.

Population centres are classified into three groups, depending on the size of their population:

  • small population centres, with a population of between 1,000 and 29,999;
  • medium population centres, with a population of between 30,000 and 99,999
  • large urban population centres, consisting of a population of 100,000 and over.

Rates were calculated on randomly rounded data, and may not necessarily add up to 100%.

Return to health data footnote 95 referrer

Footnote 96

Rural area population

Source : 2011 Census, Statistics Canada.
Related data: Not applicable

A population centre has a population of at least 1,000 and a population density of 400 persons or more per square kilometre, based on the current census population count. All areas outside population centres are classified as rural areas.

Taken together, population centres and rural areas cover all of Canada.

Population centres are classified into three groups, depending on the size of their population:

  • small population centres, with a population of between 1,000 and 29,999;
  • medium population centres, with a population of between 30,000 and 99,999
  • large urban population centres, consisting of a population of 100,000 and over.

Rates were calculated on randomly rounded data, and may not necessarily add up to 100%.

Return to health data footnote 96 referrer

Footnote 97

Population density per square kilometre

Source : 2011 Census, Statistics Canada.
Related data: Not applicable

Population density is the number of persons per square kilometre. The calculation for population density is total population divided by land area. Land area is the area in square kilometres of the land-based portions of standard geographic areas.

Return to health data footnote 97 referrer

Footnote 98

Dependency ratio

Source : Demography Division, Statistics Canada. Data are derived from the Census and administrative sources on births, deaths, and migration, 2011.
CANSIM table no(s).: 109-5326

The ratio of the combined population aged between 0 to 19 years old and the population aged of 65 years and over to the population aged between 20 to 64 years old.

This ratio is usually presented as the number of dependents for every 100 people in the working age population.

Return to health data footnote 98 referrer

Footnote 99

Aboriginal population

Source : 2011 National Household Survey, Statistics Canada.
Global non-response rates (GNR): Central East (HR) = 29.6%, Ontario = 27.1%
Related data: Not applicable

'Aboriginal identity' refers to whether the person reported being an Aboriginal person, that is, First Nations (North American Indian), Métis or Inuk (Inuit) and/or being a Registered or Treaty Indian (that is, registered under the Indian Act of Canada) and/or being a member of a First Nation or Indian band. Aboriginal peoples of Canada are defined in the Constitution Act, 1982, section 35 (2) as including the Indian, Inuit and Métis peoples of Canada.

Aboriginal identity is reported for the population in private households.

Return to health data footnote 99 referrer

Footnote 100

Immigrant population

Source : 2011 National Household Survey, Statistics Canada.
Global non-response rates (GNR): Central East (HR) = 29.6%, Ontario = 27.1%
Related data: Not applicable

Immigrant refers to a person who is or has ever been a landed immigrant/permanent resident. This person has been granted the right to live in Canada permanently by immigration authorities. Some immigrants have resided in Canada for a number of years, while others have arrived recently. Some immigrants are Canadian citizens, while others are not. Most immigrants are born outside Canada, but a small number are born in Canada. In the 2011 National Household Survey, 'Immigrants' includes immigrants who landed in Canada prior to May 10, 2011.

Immigrant status is reported for the population in private households.

Return to health data footnote 100 referrer

Footnote 101

1 year internal migrants

Source : 2011 National Household Survey, Statistics Canada.
Global non-response rates (GNR): Central East (HR) = 29.6%, Ontario = 27.1%
Related data: Not applicable

'Mobility status - Place of residence 1 year ago' refers to the status of a person with regard to the place of residence on the reference day, May 10, 2011, in relation to the place of residence on the same date one year earlier. Persons who have not moved are referred to as non-movers and persons who have moved from one residence to another are referred to as movers. Movers include non-migrants and migrants. Non-migrants are persons who did move but remained in the same city, town, township, village or Indian reserve. Migrants include internal migrants who moved to a different city, town, township, village or Indian reserve within Canada. External migrants include persons who lived outside Canada at the earlier reference date.

It is reported for population aged 1 year and over residing in Canada, in private households.

Return to health data footnote 101 referrer

Footnote 102

5 year internal migrants

Source : 2011 National Household Survey, Statistics Canada.
Global non-response rates (GNR): Central East (HR) = 29.6%, Ontario = 27.1%
Related data: Not applicable

'Mobility status - Place of residence 5 years ago' refers to the status of a person with regard to the place of residence on the reference day, May 10, 2011, in relation to the place of residence on the same date five years earlier. Persons who have not moved are referred to as non-movers and persons who have moved from one residence to another are referred to as movers. Movers include non-migrants and migrants. Non-migrants are persons who did move but remained in the same city, town, township, village or Indian reserve. Migrants include internal migrants who moved to a different city, town, township, village or Indian reserve within Canada. External migrants include persons who lived outside Canada at the earlier reference date.'

It is reported for population aged 5 years and over residing in Canada, in private households.

Return to health data footnote 102 referrer

Footnote 103

Population living within a Census Metropolitan Area, a Census Agglomeration or a strong Census Metropolitan Area and Census Agglomeration Influenced Zone.

Source : 2011 Census, Statistics Canada.
Related data: Not applicable

Strong census metropolitan area and census agglomeration influenced zones (MIZ) is the population or the proportion of the population living in census metropolitan areas (CMA), census agglomerations (CA) and communities that fall outside CMA and/or CA that have at least 30% of the employed labour force commuting to CMA and/or CA. The Statistical Area Classification (SAC) groups census subdivisions according to whether they are a component of a census metropolitan area, a census agglomeration, a census metropolitan area and census agglomeration influenced zone (strong MIZ, moderate MIZ, weak MIZ or no MIZ), or the territories (Yukon, Northwest Territories and Nunavut). Commuting flows are based on the 2006 Census place of work file.

A census metropolitan area (CMA) or a census agglomeration (CA) is formed by one or more adjacent municipalities centred on a population centre (known as the core). A CMA must have a total population of at least 100,000 of which 50,000 or more must live in the core. A CA must have a core population of at least 10,000. To be included in the CMA or CA, other adjacent municipalities must have a high degree of integration with the core, as measured by commuting flows derived from previous census place of work data.

Return to health data footnote 103 referrer

Footnote 104

Lone-parent families

Source : 2011 Census, Statistics Canada.
Related data: Not applicable

Census family refers to a married couple (with or without children of either and/or both spouses), a common-law couple (with or without children of either and/or both partners) or a lone parent of any marital status, with at least one child.

Return to health data footnote 104 referrer

Footnote 105

Visible minority population

Source : 2011 National Household Survey, Statistics Canada.
Global non-response rates (GNR): Central East (HR) = 29.6%, Ontario = 27.1%
Related data: Not applicable

Visible minority refers to whether a person belongs to a visible minority group as defined by the Employment Equity Act and, if so, the visible minority group to which the person belongs. The Employment Equity Act defines visible minorities as 'persons, other than Aboriginal peoples, who are non-Caucasian in race or non-white in colour.' The visible minority population consists mainly of the following groups: South Asian, Chinese, Black, Filipino, Latin American, Arab, Southeast Asian, West Asian, Korean and Japanese.

Visible minority is reported for the population in private households.

Return to health data footnote 105 referrer

Footnote 106

Contact with a medical doctor in the past 12 months

Source : Canadian Community Health Survey, Statistics Canada, 2011/2012.
CANSIM table no(s).: 105-0502, 105-0592

Population aged 12 and over who reported having consulted with a medical doctor in the past 12 months.

Medical doctor includes family or general practitioners as well as specialists such as surgeons, allergists, orthopaedists, gynaecologists or psychiatrists. For population aged 12 to 17, includes pediatricians.

Return to health data footnote 106 referrer

Footnote 107

Coronary artery bypass graft

Source : Discharge Abstract Database (DAD), CIHI; Fichier des hospitalisations MED-ÉCHO, ministère de la Santé et des Services sociaux, April 1, 2011 to March 31, 2012.
Related data: Coronary artery bypass graft surgery rate

Age-standardized rate of coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery performed on inpatients in acute care hospitals per 100,000 population age 20 and over.

As with other types of surgical procedures, variations in CABG surgery rates can be attributed to numerous factors, including differences in population demographics, physician practice patterns, and availability of services. In cases amenable to treatment with less invasive procedures percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), an alternative intervention to improve blood flow to the heart muscle, may be used. Variations in the extent to which PCI is utilized may result in variations the rate of in bypass surgery.

Refer to the technical notes for more details.

CIHI: Canadian Institute for Health Information

Return to health data footnote 107 referrer

Footnote 108

Percutaneous coronary intervention

Source : Discharge Abstract Database (DAD), National Ambulatory Care Reporting System (NACRS), CIHI; Alberta Ambulatory Care Database, Alberta Health and Wellness, April 1, 2011 to March 31, 2012.
Related data: Percutaneous coronary intervention rate

Age-standardized rate of percutaneous coronary interventions (PCI) performed on patients in acute care hospitals, same day surgery facilities or catheterization laboratories, per 100,000 population age 20 years and over.

In many cases, PCI serves as a non-surgical alternative to coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery and is undertaken for the purpose of opening obstructed coronary arteries. While PCI encompasses several techniques, angioplasty is the procedure most frequently provided. The choice of revascularization mode (that is, PCI or CABG) depends on numerous factors including severity of coronary artery disease, physician preferences, availability of services, referral patterns, as well as differences in population health and socio-economic status.

Rates for Quebec are not available due to differences in data collection. Canada rate does not include Quebec.
Refer to the technical notes for more details.

CIHI: Canadian Institute for Health Information

Return to health data footnote 108 referrer

Footnote 109

Cardiac revascularization

Source : Discharge Abstract Database (DAD), National Ambulatory Care Reporting System (NACRS), CIHI; Alberta Ambulatory Care Database, Alberta Health and Wellness, April 1, 2011 to March 31, 2012.
Related data: Cardiac revascularization rate

Age-standardized rate of coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery performed on inpatients in acute care hospitals or percutaneous coronary interventions (PCI) performed on patients in acute care hospitals, same day surgery facilities or catheterization laboratories, per 100,000 population age 20 years and over.

The choice of revascularization mode (i.e., PCI or CABG) depends on numerous factors including severity of coronary artery disease, physician preferences, availability of services, referral patterns, as well as differences in population health and socio-economic status. The combined cardiac revascularization rate represents total activity of cardiac revascularization in a jurisdiction.

Rates for Quebec are not available due to differences in data collection. Canada rate does not include Quebec.

Refer to the technical notes for more details.

CIHI: Canadian Institute for Health Information

Return to health data footnote 109 referrer

Footnote 110

Hip replacement

Source : Discharge Abstract Database (DAD), CIHI; Fichier des hospitalisations MED-ÉCHO, ministère de la Santé et des Services sociaux, April 1, 2011 to March 31, 2012.
Related data: Hip replacement rate

Age-standardized rate of unilateral or bilateral hip replacement surgery performed on inpatients in acute care hospitals per 100,000 population age 20 years and over.

Hip replacement surgery has the potential to result in considerable improvement in functional status, pain relief, as well as other gains in health-related quality of life. Over the past two decades, rates of surgery have increased substantially. Wide inter-regional variation in the hip replacement rate may be attributable to numerous factors including the availability of services, provider practice patterns, and patient preferences.

Beginning with 2005/2006, this indicator is calculated for the population age 20 years and over and therefore is not comparable with rates reported for previous years. Rates for the previous years, calculated using the new definition, are presented to enable comparisons over time.

Refer to the technical notes for more details.

CIHI: Canadian Institute for Health Information

Return to health data footnote 110 referrer

Footnote 111

Knee replacement

Source : Discharge Abstract Database (DAD), National Ambulatory Care Reporting System (NACRS), CIHI; Fichier des hospitalisations MED-ÉCHO, ministère de la Santé et des Services sociaux; April 1, 2011 to March 31, 2012.
Related data: Knee replacement rate

Age-standardized rate of unilateral or bilateral knee replacement surgery performed on patients in acute care hospitals or same-day surgery facilities, per 100,000 population age 20 years and over.

Knee replacement surgery has the potential to result in considerable improvement in functional status, pain relief, as well as other gains in health-related quality of life. Over the past two decades, rates of surgery have increased substantially. Wide inter-regional variation in the knee replacement rate may be attributable to numerous factors including the availability of services, provider practice patterns, and patient preferences.

Beginning with 2005/2006, this indicator is calculated for the population aged 20 years and older and includes same day surgery procedures, and therefore is not comparable with rates reported for previous years. Rates for the previous years, calculated using the new definition, are presented to enable comparisons over time.

Refer to the technical notes for more details.

CIHI: Canadian Institute for Health Information

Return to health data footnote 111 referrer

Footnote 112

Hysterectomy

Source : DAD, NACRS, CIHI; Alberta Ambulatory Care Database, Alberta Health and Wellness; Fichier des hospitalisations MED-ÉCHO, ministère de la Santé et des Services sociaux; April 1, 2011 to March 31, 2012.
Related data: Hysterectomy rate

Age-standardized rate for hysterectomy provided to inpatients in acute care hospitals, per 100,000 women age 20 and over.

Utilization rates may reflect the level of uncertainty about the appropriate use of this surgical procedure. The "right" level of utilization is not known.

Beginning with 2006/2007 data, hysterectomy rates include both total and sub-total hysterectomies, similar to the reporting prior to 2001/2002 data.  Sub-total hysterectomy was not uniquely identified in the Canadian Classification of Health Interventions (CCI) versions 2001 and 2003, therefore hysterectomy rates reported for 2001/2002 to 2005/2006 fiscal years included only total hysterectomies. Identification of sub-total hysterectomies became possible again with version 2006 of CCI. For jurisdictions with higher volumes of sub-total hysterectomies comparability with the previous years might be affected.

Beginning with 2005/2006 data, this indicator includes same day surgery procedures. However, due to small counts of same day surgery procedures, comparability with the previous years is not affected.

Refer to the technical notes for more details.

CIHI: Canadian Institute for Health Information

DAD: Discharge Abstract Database

NACRS: National Ambulatory Care Reporting System

Return to health data footnote 112 referrer

Footnote 113

Inflow/outflow ratio - Overall

Source : DAD, NACRS, CIHI; Alberta Ambulatory Care Database, Alberta Health and Wellness; Fichier des hospitalisations MED-ÉCHO, ministère de la Santé et des Services sociaux; April 1, 2011 to March 31, 2012.
Related data: Inflow/Outflow ratio (Overall)

A ratio of the number of discharges from relevant facilities (acute care/same day surgery) within a given region divided by the number of discharges generated by residents of that region. An overall ratio is calculated for discharges associated with any diagnosis or procedure for acute care discharges only, and separately for hip replacement, knee replacement, hysterectomy, percutaneous coronary intervention and coronary artery bypass surgery procedures from all relevant facilities.

This indicator reflects the balance between the quantity of hospital stays provided to both residents and non-residents by all acute care hospitals in a given region and the extent of acute care utilization by residents of that region, whether they receive care within or out of the region. A ratio less than one indicates that hospital stays utilized by residents of a region exceeded hospital care provided within that region, suggesting an outflow effect. A ratio greater than one indicates hospital stays provided by a region exceeded the quantity of stays utilized by its residents, suggesting an inflow effect. A ratio of one indicates that the volume of hospital discharges in the region is equivalent to that generated by its residents, suggesting that inflow and outflow activity, if it exists at all, is balanced.

Refer to the technical notes for more details.

CIHI: Canadian Institute for Health Information

DAD: Discharge Abstract Database

NACRS: National Ambulatory Care Reporting System

Return to health data footnote 113 referrer

Footnote 114

Mental illness hospitalization rate

Source : Discharge Abstract Database (DAD), Ontario Mental Health Reporting System (OMHRS), CIHI; Fichier des hospitalisations MED-ÉCHO, ministère de la Santé et des Services sociaux du Québec, April 1, 2011 to March 31, 2012.
Related data: Mental illness hospitalization rate

Age-standardized rate of separations from general hospitals through discharge or death following a hospitalization for a selected mental illness1, per 100,000 population.

Hospitalization rate is a partial measure of general hospital utilization. It does not include inpatients who were using hospital services but had not yet been discharged within the fiscal year of interest. This indicator may reflect differences between jurisdictions, such as the health of the population, differing health service delivery models and variations in the availability and accessibility of specialized, residential and/or ambulatory and community-based services.

Monitoring hospital service use captures only the relatively small proportion of individuals who are acutely ill and require in-hospital treatment, compared to the much larger contingent that receives (or fails to receive) outpatient or community services. For these reasons, this indicator cannot be used to estimate the prevalence of mental disorders in the general population.

While this indicator does not include data from free-standing psychiatric facilities, it is acknowledged that in some jurisdictions (for example, Alberta) direct substitution between general and psychiatric facilities exists; the extent of this practice is unknown. As such, this indicator provides a partial view of hospital utilization for mental health issues in an acute setting.

1The mental illnesses selected for this indicator are substance-related disorders; schizophrenia, delusional and non-organic psychotic disorders; mood/affective disorders; anxiety disorders; and selected disorders of adult personality and behaviour.

Refer to the technical notes for more details.

CIHI: Canadian Institute for Health Information

Return to health data footnote 114 referrer

Footnote 115

Mental illness patient days

Source : Discharge Abstract Database (DAD), Ontario Mental Health Reporting System (OMHRS), CIHI; Fichier des hospitalisations MED-ÉCHO, ministère de la Santé et des Services sociaux du Québec; April 1, 2011 to March 31, 2012.
Related data: Mental illness patient days

Age-adjusted rate of total number of days in general hospitals for selected mental illness1, per 10,000 population.

The patient days rate is a partial measure of general hospital utilization. It does not include patients who were admitted to hospital but had not yet been discharged within the fiscal year of interest. Patient-days are influenced by the number of hospitalizations and the length of stay. For the same number of hospitalizations, the rate of patient days will increase as length of stay increases. This indicator may reflect differences between jurisdictions, such as the health of the population, differing health service delivery models and variations in the availability of and accessibility to specialized, residential and/or ambulatory and community-based health services.

While this indicator does not include data from free-standing psychiatric facilities, it is acknowledged that in some jurisdictions (for example, Alberta) direct substitution between general and psychiatric facilities exists; the extent of this practice is unknown. As such, this indicator provides a partial view of hospital utilization for mental health issues in an acute setting.

1The mental illnesses selected for this indicator are substance-related disorders; schizophrenia, delusional and non-organic psychotic disorders; mood/affective disorders; anxiety disorders; and selected disorders of adult personality and behaviour.

Refer to the technical notes for more details.

CIHI: Canadian Institute for Health Information

Return to health data footnote 115 referrer

Footnote 116

Doctors rate - General/family physicians

Source : Scott's Medical Database, CIHI; January 1st, 2011 to December 31, 2012.
Related data: Doctors

Physician counts include all active physicians as of December 31 of the reference year. Physicians in clinical and non-clinical practice are included. Residents and unlicensed physicians who have requested that their information not be published are excluded. Generally, specialist physicians include certificants of the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada (RCPSC) and/or the Collège des médecins du Québec (CMQ) with the exception of Saskatchewan, Newfoundland and Labrador, Nova Scotia, New Brunswick and Yukon, where specialists also include physicians who are licensed as specialists but who are not certified by the RCPSC or the CMQ (that is, non-certified specialists). For all other jurisdictions non-certified specialists are counted as general practitioners with the exception of the criteria just noted, all other physicians are counted as family practitioners, including certificants of the College of Family Physicians of Canada. For further information on physician count methodologies please see CIHI's reports on the “Supply, Distribution and Migration of Canadian Physicians” and “Certified and Non-Certified Specialists: Understanding the Numbers” (www.cihi.ca).

Physician-to-population rates are useful indicators and are published by a variety of agencies to support health human resource planning. However, due to differences in data collection, processing and reporting methodology, CIHI results may differ from provincial and territorial data. Readers are cautioned to avoid inferences regarding the adequacy of provider resources based on supply ratios alone.

Note: Scott's Medical Database (SMDB) information may undercount physicians due to Provincial/Territorial licensing authority data supply interruptions. SMDB data does not reflect licensing authority updates for the following jurisdictions and years: British Columbia 2004; Québec 2003; Ontario 2002; Alberta and the Yukon 2000.

Refer to the technical notes for more details.

CIHI: Canadian Institute for Health Information

Return to health data footnote 116 referrer

Footnote 117

Doctors rate - Specialist physicians

Source : Scott's Medical Database, CIHI; January 1st, 2011 to December 31, 2012.
Related data: Specialist physicians

Physician counts include all active physicians as of December 31 of the reference year. Physicians in clinical and non-clinical practice are included. Residents and unlicensed physicians who have requested that their information not be published are excluded. Generally, specialist physicians include certificants of the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada (RCPSC) and/or the Collège des médecins du Québec (CMQ) with the exception of Saskatchewan, Newfoundland and Labrador, Nova Scotia, New Brunswick and Yukon, where specialists also include physicians who are licensed as specialists but who are not certified by the RCPSC or the CMQ (that is, non-certified specialists). For all other jurisdictions non-certified specialists are counted as general practitioners with the exception of the criteria just noted, all other physicians are counted as family practitioners, including certificants of the College of Family Physicians of Canada. For further information on physician count methodologies please see CIHI's reports on the “Supply, Distribution and Migration of Canadian Physicians” and “Certified and Non-Certified Specialists: Understanding the Numbers” (www.cihi.ca).

Physician-to-population rates are useful indicators and are published by a variety of agencies to support health human resource planning. However, due to differences in data collection, processing and reporting methodology, CIHI results may differ from provincial and territorial data. Readers are cautioned to avoid inferences regarding the adequacy of provider resources based on supply ratios alone.

Note: Scott's Medical Database (SMDB) information may undercount physicians due to Provincial/Territorial licensing authority data supply interruptions. SMDB data does not reflect licensing authority updates for the following jurisdictions and years: British Columbia 2004; Québec 2003; Ontario 2002; Alberta and the Yukon 2000.

Refer to the technical notes for more details.

CIHI: Canadian Institute for Health Information

Return to health data footnote 117 referrer

Source: Statistics Canada.

How to cite: Statistics Canada. 2013. Central East (Health Region), Ontario and Ontario (table). Health Profile. Statistics Canada Catalogue no. 82-228-XWE. Ottawa. Released December 12, 2013.
http://www12.statcan.gc.ca/health-sante/82-228/index.cfm?Lang=E (accessed May 15, 2021).

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Health Profile, December 2013, 2011 Census data
Table summary
The table shows total, male, and female census data grouped by geography (appearing as column headers) for selected characteristics (appearing as row headers).
Characteristic Central East
(HR)
Ontario
Change geography 1 Change geography 2
Total Male Female Total Male Female
Age characteristics
Total population by age groupsCensus data: Footnote 1 1,498,650 725,000 773,645 12,851,820 6,263,140 6,588,685
0 to 4 years 80,560 41,125 39,440 704,260 360,590 343,670
5 to 9 years 82,200 42,070 40,130 712,755 365,290 347,465
10 to 14 years 91,540 46,795 44,750 763,755 391,630 372,125
15 to 19 years 106,290 54,665 51,625 863,635 443,680 419,950
15 years 20,770 10,660 10,110 168,840 86,700 82,140
16 years 21,485 11,100 10,390 172,840 89,195 83,645
17 years 21,320 11,055 10,265 171,405 88,230 83,170
18 years 21,390 10,875 10,515 173,930 89,225 84,705
19 years 21,330 10,975 10,355 176,620 90,330 86,290
20 to 24 years 99,750 50,945 48,805 852,910 432,490 420,415
25 to 29 years 89,275 43,790 45,490 815,120 400,045 415,075
30 to 34 years 85,410 40,225 45,180 800,365 383,340 417,030
35 to 39 years 92,160 43,560 48,605 844,335 405,845 438,485
40 to 44 years 104,480 49,275 55,205 924,075 447,920 476,155
45 to 49 years 126,875 61,080 65,795 1,055,880 517,510 538,370
50 to 54 years 120,670 58,680 61,990 1,006,140 492,560 513,580
55 to 59 years 103,805 50,015 53,790 864,620 418,755 445,865
60 to 64 years 91,230 43,640 47,590 765,655 370,370 395,275
65 to 69 years 66,695 31,855 34,840 563,485 270,875 292,610
70 to 74 years 51,965 24,010 27,955 440,780 206,350 234,435
75 to 79 years 43,580 19,815 23,775 356,150 161,345 194,805
80 to 84 years 32,955 13,700 19,255 271,510 113,620 157,890
85 years and over 29,205 9,770 19,435 246,400 80,925 165,475
Median age of the populationCensus data: Footnote 2 41.1 39.9 42.1 40.4 39.4 41.3
% of the population aged 15 and over 83.0 82.1 83.9 83.0 82.2 83.9
Marital status
Total population 15 years and over by marital statusCensus data: Footnote 3 1,244,345 595,015 649,330 10,671,050 5,145,630 5,525,420
Married or living with a common-law partner 715,495 356,975 358,515 6,158,605 3,078,940 3,079,665
Married (and not separated) 632,585 315,675 316,910 5,367,400 2,681,320 2,686,075
Living common law 82,905 41,300 41,605 791,210 397,620 393,590
Not married and not living with a common-law partner 528,850 238,045 290,815 4,512,440 2,066,690 2,445,750
Single (never legally married) 347,170 181,975 165,195 2,985,020 1,583,760 1,401,260
Separated 38,620 15,510 23,110 319,805 133,790 186,015
Divorced 69,590 26,460 43,135 593,730 231,160 362,570
Widowed 73,470 14,100 59,375 613,880 117,980 495,905
Family characteristics
Total number of census families in private householdsCensus data: Footnote 4 428,555 Note ...: not applicable Note ...: not applicable 3,612,200 Note ...: not applicable Note ...: not applicable
Size of census family: 2 persons 192,405 Note ...: not applicable Note ...: not applicable 1,686,655 Note ...: not applicable Note ...: not applicable
Size of census family: 3 persons 101,095 Note ...: not applicable Note ...: not applicable 812,960 Note ...: not applicable Note ...: not applicable
Size of census family: 4 persons 95,060 Note ...: not applicable Note ...: not applicable 783,500 Note ...: not applicable Note ...: not applicable
Size of census family: 5 or more persons 39,995 Note ...: not applicable Note ...: not applicable 329,085 Note ...: not applicable Note ...: not applicable
Total number of census families in private householdsCensus data: Footnote 5 428,560 Note ...: not applicable Note ...: not applicable 3,612,205 Note ...: not applicable Note ...: not applicable
Total couple families by family structure and number of children 348,200 Note ...: not applicable Note ...: not applicable 3,007,560 Note ...: not applicable Note ...: not applicable
Married couples 306,865 Note ...: not applicable Note ...: not applicable 2,612,895 Note ...: not applicable Note ...: not applicable
Without children at home 122,510 Note ...: not applicable Note ...: not applicable 1,090,740 Note ...: not applicable Note ...: not applicable
With children at home 184,360 Note ...: not applicable Note ...: not applicable 1,522,150 Note ...: not applicable Note ...: not applicable
1 child 68,455 Note ...: not applicable Note ...: not applicable 559,155 Note ...: not applicable Note ...: not applicable
2 children 81,305 Note ...: not applicable Note ...: not applicable 676,880 Note ...: not applicable Note ...: not applicable
3 or more children 34,595 Note ...: not applicable Note ...: not applicable 286,110 Note ...: not applicable Note ...: not applicable
Common-law couples 41,340 Note ...: not applicable Note ...: not applicable 394,670 Note ...: not applicable Note ...: not applicable
Without children at home 22,690 Note ...: not applicable Note ...: not applicable 236,010 Note ...: not applicable Note ...: not applicable
With children at home 18,650 Note ...: not applicable Note ...: not applicable 158,660 Note ...: not applicable Note ...: not applicable
1 child 8,925 Note ...: not applicable Note ...: not applicable 77,160 Note ...: not applicable Note ...: not applicable
2 children 6,685 Note ...: not applicable Note ...: not applicable 55,605 Note ...: not applicable Note ...: not applicable
3 or more children 3,035 Note ...: not applicable Note ...: not applicable 25,890 Note ...: not applicable Note ...: not applicable
Total lone-parent families by sex of parent and number of children 80,355 Note ...: not applicable Note ...: not applicable 604,645 Note ...: not applicable Note ...: not applicable
Female parent 65,230 Note ...: not applicable Note ...: not applicable 486,470 Note ...: not applicable Note ...: not applicable
1 child 37,325 Note ...: not applicable Note ...: not applicable 282,085 Note ...: not applicable Note ...: not applicable
2 children 19,690 Note ...: not applicable Note ...: not applicable 145,375 Note ...: not applicable Note ...: not applicable
3 or more children 8,220 Note ...: not applicable Note ...: not applicable 59,015 Note ...: not applicable Note ...: not applicable
Male parent 15,125 Note ...: not applicable Note ...: not applicable 118,175 Note ...: not applicable Note ...: not applicable
1 child 9,885 Note ...: not applicable Note ...: not applicable 77,820 Note ...: not applicable Note ...: not applicable
2 children 4,030 Note ...: not applicable Note ...: not applicable 31,265 Note ...: not applicable Note ...: not applicable
3 or more children 1,215 Note ...: not applicable Note ...: not applicable 9,085 Note ...: not applicable Note ...: not applicable
Total children in census families in private households 503,755 Note ...: not applicable Note ...: not applicable 4,083,925 Note ...: not applicable Note ...: not applicable
Under six years of age 96,035 Note ...: not applicable Note ...: not applicable 839,960 Note ...: not applicable Note ...: not applicable
6 to 14 years 156,120 Note ...: not applicable Note ...: not applicable 1,323,750 Note ...: not applicable Note ...: not applicable
15 to 17 years 61,425 Note ...: not applicable Note ...: not applicable 496,005 Note ...: not applicable Note ...: not applicable
18 to 24 years 114,245 Note ...: not applicable Note ...: not applicable 888,985 Note ...: not applicable Note ...: not applicable
25 years and over 75,925 Note ...: not applicable Note ...: not applicable 535,230 Note ...: not applicable Note ...: not applicable
Average number of children at home per census family 1.2 Note ...: not applicable Note ...: not applicable 1.1 Note ...: not applicable Note ...: not applicable
Household and dwelling characteristics
Total number of persons in private households 1,478,265 717,455 760,810 12,655,130 6,179,005 6,476,125
Number of persons not in census families 197,745 87,820 109,925 1,951,440 889,600 1,061,845
Living with relativesCensus data: Footnote 6 41,035 14,995 26,040 295,100 113,180 181,925
Living with non-relatives only 46,165 25,825 20,335 425,360 233,900 191,465
Living alone 110,550 47,000 63,550 1,230,980 542,525 688,455
Number of census family persons 1,280,520 629,635 650,885 10,703,690 5,289,410 5,414,280
Average number of persons per census family 3.0 Note ...: not applicable Note ...: not applicable 3.0 Note ...: not applicable Note ...: not applicable
Total number of persons 65 years and over in private households 209,625 94,900 114,725 1,752,725 796,110 956,615
Number of persons not in census families aged 65 years and over 64,245 17,250 46,995 563,605 155,405 408,200
Living with relativesCensus data footnote 6 15,620 3,075 12,540 105,130 22,345 82,785
Living with non-relatives only 4,095 1,970 2,125 30,835 14,715 16,125
Living alone 44,530 12,205 32,325 427,640 118,350 309,290
Number of census family persons aged 65 years and over 145,380 77,645 67,735 1,189,120 640,705 548,415
Total number of private households by household typeCensus data: Footnote 7 534,785 Note ...: not applicable Note ...: not applicable 4,887,510 Note ...: not applicable Note ...: not applicable
Census-family households 407,065 Note ...: not applicable Note ...: not applicable 3,475,030 Note ...: not applicable Note ...: not applicable
One-family-only householdsCensus data: Footnote 8 351,005 Note ...: not applicable Note ...: not applicable 3,103,515 Note ...: not applicable Note ...: not applicable
Couple-family householdsCensus data: Footnote 9 293,575 Note ...: not applicable Note ...: not applicable 2,642,680 Note ...: not applicable Note ...: not applicable
Without children 122,705 Note ...: not applicable Note ...: not applicable 1,171,505 Note ...: not applicable Note ...: not applicable
With children 170,865 Note ...: not applicable Note ...: not applicable 1,471,175 Note ...: not applicable Note ...: not applicable
Lone-parent-family households 57,430 Note ...: not applicable Note ...: not applicable 460,840 Note ...: not applicable Note ...: not applicable
Other family householdsCensus data: Footnote 10 56,065 Note ...: not applicable Note ...: not applicable 371,515 Note ...: not applicable Note ...: not applicable
One-family households with persons not in a census family 35,860 Note ...: not applicable Note ...: not applicable 242,850 Note ...: not applicable Note ...: not applicable
Couple-family householdsCensus data: Footnote 11 24,425 Note ...: not applicable Note ...: not applicable 167,865 Note ...: not applicable Note ...: not applicable
Without children 7,075 Note ...: not applicable Note ...: not applicable 52,945 Note ...: not applicable Note ...: not applicable
With children 17,355 Note ...: not applicable Note ...: not applicable 114,920 Note ...: not applicable Note ...: not applicable
Lone-parent-family households 11,435 Note ...: not applicable Note ...: not applicable 74,985 Note ...: not applicable Note ...: not applicable
Two-or-more-family households 20,200 Note ...: not applicable Note ...: not applicable 128,660 Note ...: not applicable Note ...: not applicable
Non-census-family households 127,720 Note ...: not applicable Note ...: not applicable 1,412,480 Note ...: not applicable Note ...: not applicable
One-person households 110,545 Note ...: not applicable Note ...: not applicable 1,230,980 Note ...: not applicable Note ...: not applicable
Two-or-more-person households 17,170 Note ...: not applicable Note ...: not applicable 181,500 Note ...: not applicable Note ...: not applicable
Total number of occupied private dwellings by structural type of dwellingCensus data: Footnote 12 534,785 Note ...: not applicable Note ...: not applicable 4,887,505 Note ...: not applicable Note ...: not applicable
Single-detached house 317,715 Note ...: not applicable Note ...: not applicable 2,718,880 Note ...: not applicable Note ...: not applicable
Apartment, building that has five or more storeys 84,485 Note ...: not applicable Note ...: not applicable 789,970 Note ...: not applicable Note ...: not applicable
Movable dwellingCensus data: Footnote 13 665 Note ...: not applicable Note ...: not applicable 15,800 Note ...: not applicable Note ...: not applicable
Other dwellingCensus data: Footnote 14 131,920 Note ...: not applicable Note ...: not applicable 1,362,860 Note ...: not applicable Note ...: not applicable
Semi-detached house 23,395 Note ...: not applicable Note ...: not applicable 279,470 Note ...: not applicable Note ...: not applicable
Row house 45,645 Note ...: not applicable Note ...: not applicable 415,225 Note ...: not applicable Note ...: not applicable
Apartment, duplex 25,880 Note ...: not applicable Note ...: not applicable 160,460 Note ...: not applicable Note ...: not applicable
Apartment, building that has fewer than five storeys 35,915 Note ...: not applicable Note ...: not applicable 498,160 Note ...: not applicable Note ...: not applicable
Other single-attached house 1,080 Note ...: not applicable Note ...: not applicable 9,540 Note ...: not applicable Note ...: not applicable
Total number of private households by household sizeCensus data: Footnote 15 534,785 Note ...: not applicable Note ...: not applicable 4,887,505 Note ...: not applicable Note ...: not applicable
1 person 110,550 Note ...: not applicable Note ...: not applicable 1,230,975 Note ...: not applicable Note ...: not applicable
2 persons 168,550 Note ...: not applicable Note ...: not applicable 1,584,415 Note ...: not applicable Note ...: not applicable
3 persons 96,395 Note ...: not applicable Note ...: not applicable 803,030 Note ...: not applicable Note ...: not applicable
4 persons 94,850 Note ...: not applicable Note ...: not applicable 783,925 Note ...: not applicable Note ...: not applicable
5 persons 40,230 Note ...: not applicable Note ...: not applicable 310,860 Note ...: not applicable Note ...: not applicable
6 or more persons 24,210 Note ...: not applicable Note ...: not applicable 174,305 Note ...: not applicable Note ...: not applicable
Number of persons in private households 1,478,265 Note ...: not applicable Note ...: not applicable 12,655,135 Note ...: not applicable Note ...: not applicable
Average number of persons in private households 2.8 Note ...: not applicable Note ...: not applicable 2.6 Note ...: not applicable Note ...: not applicable
Detailed mother tongue
Detailed mother tongue - Total population excluding institutional residentsCensus data: Footnote 16 1,485,985 720,320 765,660 12,722,060 6,210,335 6,511,730
  Single responses  1,452,460 704,195 748,265 12,434,770 6,071,955 6,362,815
    English  1,047,795 511,210 536,575 8,677,040 4,276,970 4,400,065
    French  17,785 8,145 9,640 493,300 232,785 260,510
    Non-official languages  386,885 184,840 202,050 3,264,435 1,562,190 1,702,240
      Selected Aboriginal languagesCensus data: Footnote 17 180 65 115 15,625 7,315 8,305
        Atikamekw    0 0 0 0 0 0
        Cree, n.o.s.  35 15 20 3,930 1,835 2,095
        Dene  0 0 0 20 5 10
        Innu/Montagnais  0 0 0 5 5 5
        Inuktitut  0 0 5 300 85 215
        Mi'kmaq  5 5 0 70 20 45
        Ojibway  140 50 90 8,255 3,925 4,330
        Oji-Cree  0 5 0 3,030 1,440 1,590
        Stoney  0 0 0 5 0 0
Selected non-Aboriginal languagesCensus data: Footnote 18 383,790 183,395 200,385 3,222,400 1,542,155 1,680,245
        African languages, n.i.e 235 125 105 3,080 1,585 1,495
        Afrikaans  170 75 95 2,060 1,030 1,030
        Akan (Twi)  665 330 340 9,680 4,565 5,115
        Albanian  1,065 540 525 17,440 8,870 8,565
        Amharic  1,425 655 770 9,190 4,295 4,895
        Arabic  9,770 5,150 4,615 133,390 69,890 63,500
        Armenian  3,085 1,475 1,605 13,070 6,330 6,740
        Bantu languages, n.i.e 315 140 170 3,040 1,445 1,595
        Bengali  8,775 4,440 4,335 38,685 19,745 18,935
        Berber languages (Kabyle)  5 0 0 120 70 60
        Bisayan languages  1,245 505 740 6,380 2,395 3,985
        Bosnian  90 45 45 6,140 3,045 3,095
        Bulgarian  625 295 335 9,015 4,390 4,625
        Burmese  130 45 80 1,400 685 715
        Cantonese  41,230 18,900 22,330 186,870 87,020 99,850
        Chinese, n.o.s.  39,365 18,685 20,680 195,120 92,170 102,950
        Creoles  1,345 625 715 9,650 4,355 5,295
        Croatian  1,050 550 500 33,830 16,505 17,320
        Czech  1,100 535 565 12,115 5,675 6,440
        Danish  450 210 240 4,745 2,230 2,515
        Dutch  5,050 2,455 2,595 58,135 28,150 29,985
        Estonian  770 320 445 5,025 2,170 2,850
        Finnish  930 380 545 11,350 4,905 6,450
        Flemish  135 55 85 2,710 1,180 1,530
        Fukien  1,070 525 550 3,410 1,620 1,795
        German  10,575 4,850 5,725 140,315 65,815 74,500
        Greek  10,160 5,040 5,120 56,890 28,455 28,435
        Gujarati  14,545 7,435 7,105 68,105 34,110 33,995
        Hakka  1,210 555 655 3,535 1,685 1,850
        Hebrew  90 50 40 11,415 6,085 5,330
        Hindi  5,255 2,615 2,635 47,645 23,880 23,765
        Hungarian  3,350 1,600 1,750 41,010 19,455 21,555
        Ilocano  1,390 550 835 8,050 2,990 5,060
        Indo-Iranian languages, n.i.e 330 170 160 2,845 1,520 1,330
        Italian  13,500 6,980 6,520 251,330 123,830 127,505
        Japanese  995 375 620 12,215 4,415 7,800
        Khmer (Cambodian)  180 75 105 7,210 3,345 3,860
        Korean  2,965 1,380 1,585 64,080 30,065 34,015
        Kurdish  405 215 195 5,760 3,100 2,660
        Lao  125 70 60 5,350 2,620 2,730
        Latvian  475 215 265 4,640 1,970 2,670
        Lingala  105 45 65 755 325 430
        Lithuanian  170 70 100 5,600 2,375 3,230
        Macedonian  4,920 2,425 2,490 16,305 7,930 8,370
        Malay  650 315 335 5,305 2,395 2,910
        Malayalam  1,850 950 900 10,745 5,460 5,285
        Maltese  545 260 285 5,830 2,930 2,905
        Mandarin  24,880 11,960 12,920 118,390 55,825 62,565
        Marathi  525 260 265 4,155 2,135 2,025
        Nepali  430 220 215 3,640 1,850 1,795
        Niger-Congo languages, n.i.e 545 265 280 5,780 2,925 2,860
        Norwegian  115 50 60 1,060 465 595
        Oromo  165 80 80 1,770 890 875
        Panjabi (Punjabi)  5,905 2,955 2,950 173,975 88,090 85,885
        Pashto  1,595 795 800 8,165 4,200 3,965
        Persian (Farsi)  10,400 5,250 5,150 98,905 50,110 48,790
        Polish  8,220 3,770 4,450 128,440 58,835 69,600
        Portuguese  5,265 2,525 2,740 147,725 71,605 76,125
        Romanian  2,895 1,370 1,520 41,980 19,835 22,140
        Rundi (Kirundi)  55 20 35 1,035 455 580
        Russian  2,135 910 1,220 93,080 42,590 50,490
        Rwanda (Kinyarwanda)  70 30 40 1,120 450 670
        Semitic languages, n.i.e 595 270 320 14,930 7,345 7,590
        Serbian  1,320 680 640 41,910 20,750 21,165
        Serbo-Croatian  170 90 80 5,250 2,565 2,685
        Shanghainese  380 160 220 1,410 585 830
        Sign languages, n.i.e 185 110 75 1,580 835 745
        Sindhi  900 405 490 6,530 3,055 3,475
        Sinhala (Sinhalese)  2,075 975 1,100 9,335 4,555 4,780
        Sino-Tibetan languages, n.i.e 90 40 50 1,780 900 875
        Slavic languages, n.i.e 140 75 65 2,005 1,000 1,005
        Slovak  600 270 330 10,250 4,665 5,585
        Slovenian  615 300 310 7,505 3,475 4,030
        Somali  1,370 565 805 22,685 9,750 12,930
        Spanish  10,980 5,160 5,815 178,335 85,410 92,915
        Swahili  560 270 300 4,745 2,255 2,490
        Swedish  275 115 160 2,505 1,060 1,440
        Tagalog (Pilipino, Filipino)  29,800 12,420 17,380 140,805 53,595 87,210
        Taiwanese  330 155 175 3,020 1,390 1,625
        Tamil  48,980 23,995 24,990 111,060 54,760 56,300
        Telugu  1,115 625 495 6,730 3,525 3,205
        Thai  225 55 170 2,915 995 1,915
        Tibetan languages  190 90 100 3,965 2,005 1,960
        Tigrigna  595 270 330 5,560 2,605 2,955
        Turkish  930 495 435 16,615 8,755 7,865
        Ukrainian  2,490 1,085 1,405 41,455 18,275 23,185
        Urdu  18,760 9,525 9,240 128,730 65,470 63,260
        Vietnamese  3,005 1,395 1,605 65,915 30,920 34,990
        Yiddish  40 20 20 5,105 2,350 2,760
      Other languagesCensus data: Footnote 19 2,915 1,370 1,545 26,410 12,725 13,690
  Multiple responses          33,530 16,130 17,395 287,290 138,385 148,910
    English and French  2,940 1,370 1,570 46,605 21,805 24,795
    English and non-official language  28,675 13,875 14,795 219,425 106,790 112,635
    French and non-official language  1,165 555 615 13,645 6,285 7,365
    English, French and non-official language 745 330 410 7,615 3,495 4,115
Knowledge of official languages
Knowledge of official languages - Total population excluding institutional residentsCensus data footnote 16 1,485,985 720,325 765,665 12,722,060 6,210,335 6,511,730
  English only 1,349,675 663,305 686,370 10,984,360 5,445,050 5,539,310
  French only 1,130 495 635 42,980 18,805 24,175
  English and French 87,535 37,490 50,040 1,395,805 627,725 768,085
  Neither English nor French 47,645 19,030 28,615 298,920 118,765 180,155
First official language spoken
First official language spoken - Total population excluding institutional residentsCensus data footnote 16 1,485,985 720,325 765,660 12,722,065 6,210,340 6,511,730
  English 1,414,230 690,245 723,985 11,844,580 5,819,520 6,025,055
  French 18,180 8,375 9,805 500,270 235,620 264,655
  English and French 6,760 3,075 3,690 84,230 39,330 44,895
  Neither English nor French 46,810 18,630 28,180 292,980 115,860 177,115
Official language minority (number)Census data: Footnote 20 21,565 9,915 11,650 542,390 255,285 287,100
Official language minority (percentage)Census data footnote 20 1.5 1.4 1.5 4.3 4.1 4.4
Detailed language spoken most often at home
Detailed language spoken most often at home - Total population excluding institutional residentsCensus data footnote 16 1,485,985 720,325 765,665 12,722,065 6,210,340 6,511,730
  Single responses 1,415,100 686,220 728,875 12,156,790 5,936,965 6,219,825
    English 1,167,420 568,465 598,955 10,044,810 4,930,610 5,114,200
    French 6,965 3,250 3,715 284,115 133,495 150,620
    Non-official languages 240,715 114,505 126,210 1,827,870 872,860 955,010
      Selected Aboriginal languagesCensus data footnote 17 45 20 25 5,935 3,000 2,930
        Atikamekw   0 0 0 0 0 0
        Cree, n.o.s. 0 0 0 1,920 950 970
        Dene 0 0 0 0 0 0
        Innu/Montagnais 0 0 0 5 0 0
        Inuktitut 0 0 5 80 20 60
        Mi'kmaq 0 0 0 10 5 5
        Ojibway 40 20 25 2,855 1,510 1,345
        Oji-Cree 0 0 0 1,065 505 555
        Stoney 0 0 0 0 0 0
      Selected non-Aboriginal languagesCensus data footnote 18 239,755 114,045 125,715 1,811,985 864,990 946,995
        African languages, n.i.e. 75 35 40 1,405 675 730
        Afrikaans 50 20 25 775 385 390
        Akan (Twi) 275 125 150 5,305 2,390 2,915
        Albanian 615 300 315 10,055 5,075 4,980
        Amharic 840 385 460 5,280 2,400 2,880
        Arabic 5,120 2,535 2,585 76,410 38,095 38,315
        Armenian 2,100 990 1,115 7,375 3,435 3,940
        Bantu languages, n.i.e. 80 40 40 885 420 465
        Bengali 6,275 3,145 3,130 26,895 13,495 13,405
        Berber languages (Kabyle) 0 0 0 40 20 20
        Bisayan languages 410 180 230 2,045 895 1,150
        Bosnian 55 30 25 3,525 1,765 1,760
        Bulgarian 375 175 200 5,165 2,535 2,630
        Burmese 75 30 45 885 425 460
        Cantonese 36,105 16,370 19,735 147,795 68,295 79,500
        Chinese, n.o.s. 29,830 14,165 15,665 135,665 64,765 70,895
        Creoles 695 315 380 4,720 2,120 2,600
        Croatian 280 130 145 13,185 6,320 6,865
        Czech 465 225 245 4,325 2,055 2,265
        Danish 15 5 5 335 170 170
        Dutch 295 125 165 5,395 2,535 2,855
        Estonian 230 75 160 1,260 475 785
        Finnish 185 85 95 2,280 1,005 1,270
        Flemish 5 0 0 230 105 130
        Fukien 335 155 180 1,045 495 550
        German 1,465 660 800 39,180 18,925 20,255
        Greek 4,460 2,115 2,345 23,590 11,185 12,405
        Gujarati 9,910 4,985 4,920 42,445 20,860 21,585
        Hakka 600 280 325 1,595 740 855
        Hebrew 30 15 15 5,240 2,630 2,610
        Hindi 2,935 1,450 1,485 24,650 12,200 12,450
        Hungarian 1,340 625 715 15,440 7,260 8,175
        Ilocano 460 185 275 2,920 1,170 1,745
        Indo-Iranian languages, n.i.e. 165 85 80 1,175 590 590
        Italian 4,405 1,995 2,405 88,835 39,140 49,695
        Japanese 410 180 230 5,765 2,535 3,235
        Khmer (Cambodian) 60 25 35 4,065 1,860 2,205
        Korean 2,100 1,010 1,090 47,245 22,575 24,675
        Kurdish 240 115 125 3,580 1,835 1,745
        Lao 50 25 20 2,855 1,445 1,410
        Latvian 90 35 50 1,270 535 730
        Lingala 35 15 20 240 95 140
        Lithuanian 20 10 10 1,780 765 1,015
        Macedonian 2,405 1,165 1,245 7,290 3,495 3,795
        Malay 205 105 100 1,925 920 1,005
        Malayalam 930 490 435 5,315 2,665 2,645
        Maltese 90 45 40 1,295 625 670
        Mandarin 22,045 10,830 11,215 96,610 46,980 49,630
        Marathi 250 125 125 1,980 1,015 965
        Nepali 270 140 135 2,480 1,260 1,220
        Niger-Congo languages, n.i.e. 180 80 100 1,830 870 960
        Norwegian 15 5 5 120 50 75
        Oromo 90 40 45 1,040 490 545
        Panjabi (Punjabi) 3,455 1,695 1,760 124,100 62,105 61,995
        Pashto 1,170 570 605 5,765 2,875 2,890
        Persian (Farsi) 7,240 3,515 3,720 69,200 33,860 35,335
        Polish 3,655 1,710 1,940 60,730 28,490 32,240
        Portuguese 1,760 790 970 70,210 33,690 36,520
        Romanian 1,645 780 860 22,845 10,960 11,880
        Rundi (Kirundi) 10 5 5 375 180 195
        Russian 1,155 550 600 64,425 30,385 34,045
        Rwanda (Kinyarwanda) 35 15 20 395 165 230
        Semitic languages, n.i.e. 325 155 170 10,360 4,980 5,375
        Serbian 685 350 335 26,000 12,665 13,335
        Serbo-Croatian 55 25 30 2,500 1,220 1,285
        Shanghainese 200 95 105 660 300 365
        Sign languages, n.i.e. 310 185 125 2,650 1,535 1,115
        Sindhi 395 175 225 2,835 1,265 1,565
        Sinhala (Sinhalese) 965 455 510 4,480 2,195 2,280
        Sino-Tibetan languages, n.i.e. 35 15 20 1,410 710 695
        Slavic languages, n.i.e. 35 15 20 565 265 300
        Slovak 200 90 105 3,185 1,485 1,700
        Slovenian 125 55 75 1,815 830 990
        Somali 850 330 520 15,450 6,520 8,935
        Spanish 5,675 2,710 2,965 106,735 51,645 55,085
        Swahili 225 100 125 2,025 940 1,080
        Swedish 30 15 15 410 200 210
        Tagalog (Pilipino, Filipino) 14,140 6,180 7,955 65,225 27,135 38,095
        Taiwanese 150 65 80 1,495 710 785
        Tamil 38,440 18,710 19,735 83,645 40,665 42,980
        Telugu 675 375 300 3,820 1,955 1,870
        Thai 70 20 50 1,320 650 675
        Tibetan languages 110 50 60 3,200 1,615 1,585
        Tigrigna 320 150 175 3,075 1,390 1,680
        Turkish 525 265 260 10,395 5,265 5,135
        Ukrainian 565 240 325 15,240 6,810 8,425
        Urdu 12,645 6,250 6,395 83,520 41,750 41,770
        Vietnamese 1,850 860 985 47,355 22,240 25,120
        Yiddish 0 0 0 530 260 275
      Other languagesCensus data footnote 19 915 440 470 9,950 4,865 5,085
  Multiple responses         70,890 34,100 36,785 565,270 273,370 291,895
    English and French 2,245 995 1,250 37,955 17,250 20,705
    English and non-official language 67,005 32,400 34,600 509,105 248,050 261,055
    French and non-official language 470 205 260 6,370 2,855 3,520
    English, French and non-official language 1,170 500 670 11,845 5,225 6,620
Detailed other language spoken regularly at home
Detailed other language spoken regularly at home - Total population excluding institutional residentsCensus data footnote 16 1,485,985 720,325 765,660 12,722,060 6,210,335 6,511,725
  None 1,269,565 616,190 653,375 10,611,255 5,199,975 5,411,280
  Single responses  212,515 102,295 110,220 2,066,620 989,785 1,076,835
    English  95,500 47,015 48,480 848,410 416,070 432,340
    French  12,685 5,365 7,320 227,040 101,685 125,355
    Non-official languages  104,335 49,915 54,420 991,165 472,030 519,140
      Selected Aboriginal languagesCensus data footnote 17 270 125 145 10,750 4,985 5,770
        Atikamekw    0 0 0 0 0 0
        Cree, n.o.s.  25 10 15 2,120 980 1,140
        Dene  0 0 0 15 10 10
        Innu/Montagnais  0 0 0 5 0 5
        Inuktitut  5 5 0 220 85 135
        Mi'kmaq  5 5 5 50 20 30
        Ojibway  240 105 130 6,505 3,030 3,470
        Oji-Cree  0 0 0 1,840 870 970
        Stoney  0 0 0 0 0 0
      Selected non-Aboriginal languagesCensus data footnote 18 102,600 49,125 53,470 966,445 460,560 505,885
        African languages, n.i.e 130 65 70 1,340 675 665
        Afrikaans  145 75 70 1,285 630 660
        Akan (Twi)  345 165 180 4,585 2,195 2,390
        Albanian  365 195 170 4,625 2,315 2,310
        Amharic  520 210 310 3,085 1,430 1,655
        Arabic  3,605 1,935 1,665 45,670 24,305 21,360
        Armenian  750 360 385 3,700 1,785 1,910
        Bantu languages, n.i.e 150 55 95 1,490 675 810
        Bengali  1,620 795 825 8,115 4,155 3,960
        Berber languages (Kabyle)  0 0 0 50 25 20
        Bisayan languages  315 130 185 1,600 585 1,010
        Bosnian  20 5 15 1,790 875 915
        Bulgarian  145 70 80 2,240 1,050 1,185
        Burmese  25 10 10 405 200 205
        Cantonese  7,025 3,430 3,600 41,885 19,995 21,890
        Chinese, n.o.s.  5,045 2,470 2,580 35,080 16,715 18,365
        Creoles  1,120 505 615 7,720 3,355 4,370
        Croatian  430 200 225 13,060 6,290 6,770
        Czech  345 165 185 3,765 1,645 2,115
        Danish  155 70 90 1,690 740 950
        Dutch  1,510 670 840 18,365 8,275 10,095
        Estonian  255 115 140 1,850 785 1,065
        Finnish  340 135 205 3,725 1,530 2,195
        Flemish  30 15 15 590 230 355
        Fukien  480 230 250 1,440 695 750
        German  3,620 1,560 2,060 44,850 20,385 24,470
        Greek  5,230 2,635 2,595 29,400 14,815 14,580
        Gujarati  3,110 1,600 1,515 17,855 8,935 8,915
        Hakka  345 170 180 1,010 480 530
        Hebrew  85 40 40 8,795 4,415 4,380
        Hindi  3,705 1,925 1,780 31,720 16,115 15,605
        Hungarian  940 440 505 11,610 5,225 6,380
        Ilocano  370 155 215 2,215 830 1,385
        Indo-Iranian languages, n.i.e 120 55 65 1,050 550 505
        Italian  5,140 2,610 2,535 100,275 49,240 51,035
        Japanese  470 195 275 5,765 2,425 3,350
        Khmer (Cambodian)  75 35 40 2,105 985 1,120
        Korean  665 305 365 11,915 5,615 6,300
        Kurdish  85 45 40 1,355 730 625
        Lao  50 25 20 1,600 815 785
        Latvian  170 70 105 1,525 620 900
        Lingala  175 90 85 1,220 505 715
        Lithuanian  30 10 15 1,685 675 1,010
        Macedonian  1,640 810 835 5,710 2,780 2,930
        Malay  230 110 120 2,010 875 1,135
        Malayalam  675 340 340 4,210 2,120 2,085
        Maltese  200 85 110 2,270 1,045 1,225
        Mandarin  3,725 1,715 2,010 22,435 10,105 12,330
        Marathi  120 60 55 1,255 620 640
        Nepali  90 40 50 655 325 335
        Niger-Congo languages, n.i.e 460 225 235 4,890 2,350 2,540
        Norwegian  40 20 20 475 205 265
        Oromo  60 30 30 450 235 225
        Panjabi (Punjabi)  2,055 1,030 1,030 36,175 18,600 17,575
        Pashto  315 165 150 1,565 845 715
        Persian (Farsi)  2,005 1,050 950 19,325 10,130 9,195
        Polish  2,355 1,080 1,275 36,540 16,475 20,070
        Portuguese  2,140 1,025 1,115 56,065 27,195 28,865
        Romanian  820 395 425 11,640 5,370 6,265
        Rundi (Kirundi)  30 15 15 535 225 310
        Russian  690 300 390 20,915 9,535 11,380
        Rwanda (Kinyarwanda)  30 20 15 555 220 335
        Semitic languages, n.i.e 155 70 85 3,145 1,560 1,585
        Serbian  440 205 230 11,025 5,500 5,525
        Serbo-Croatian  60 35 25 1,355 675 675
        Shanghainese  115 50 65 460 185 275
        Sign languages, n.i.e 145 50 90 1,530 620 905
        Sindhi  430 205 225 2,660 1,255 1,410
        Sinhala (Sinhalese)  1,055 510 545 4,160 2,055 2,105
        Sino-Tibetan languages, n.i.e 25 10 15 175 85 95
        Slavic languages, n.i.e 50 20 25 570 280 295
        Slovak  175 75 100 2,965 1,305 1,665
        Slovenian  195 90 105 2,445 1,075 1,370
        Somali  460 205 250 7,410 3,415 4,000
        Spanish  4,820 2,270 2,550 64,810 31,120 33,695
        Swahili  455 210 245 3,240 1,485 1,755
        Swedish  130 50 80 1,240 520 720
        Tagalog (Pilipino, Filipino)  10,105 4,110 5,995 48,070 17,385 30,690
        Taiwanese  110 50 60 1,050 480 570
        Tamil  9,280 4,655 4,630 23,860 11,970 11,885
        Telugu  265 150 110 1,730 910 820
        Thai  90 30 55 1,120 375 745
        Tibetan languages  40 15 25 445 235 210
        Tigrigna  235 110 125 1,945 930 1,015
        Turkish  325 175 150 4,610 2,460 2,150
        Ukrainian  705 295 410 12,170 5,285 6,880
        Urdu  4,880 2,510 2,370 34,535 17,635 16,895
        Vietnamese  910 425 490 15,425 7,320 8,105
        Yiddish  10 5 5 1,540 660 875
      Other languagesCensus data footnote 19 1,465 670 800 13,970 6,485 7,490
  Multiple responses          3,905 1,840 2,065 44,190 20,580 23,610
    English and French  530 240 290 6,970 3,210 3,760
    English and non-official language  1,690 835 850 15,600 7,690 7,910
    French and non-official language  1,650 750 905 21,270 9,505 11,765
    English, French and non-official language  30 10 20 350 170 180

Census data: Symbols

Census data: Symbol legend
Symbol Description
··· not applicable

Census data: Footnotes

Footnote 1

Refers to the age at last birthday before the reference date, that is, before May 10, 2011.

Refer to the Census Dictionary for more information.

Return to Census data footnote 1 referrer

Footnote 2

The median age is an age 'x', such that exactly one half of the population is older than 'x' and the other half is younger than 'x'.

Return to Census data footnote 2 referrer

Footnote 3

Refers to the marital status of the person, taking into account his/her common-law status. For more information, refer to the Census Dictionary: Marital status.

Return to Census data footnote 3 referrer

Footnote 4

Census family - Refers to a married couple (with or without children), a common-law couple (with or without children) or a lone parent family. For more information, refer to the Census Dictionary: Census family.

Return to Census data footnote 4 referrer

Footnote 5

Census family structure - Refers to the classification of census families into married couples (with or without children of either and/or both spouses), common-law couples (with or without children of either and/or both partners), and lone-parent families by sex of parent. A couple may be of opposite or same sex. A couple with children may be further classified as either an intact family or stepfamily, and stepfamilies may, in turn, be classified as simple or complex. Children in a census family include grandchildren living with their grandparent(s) but with no parents present.

Return to Census data footnote 5 referrer

Footnote 6

Non-relatives may be present.

Return to Census data footnote 6 referrer

Footnote 7

Refers to the basic division of private households into family and non-family households. Family household refers to a household that contains at least one census family, that is, a married couple with or without children, or a couple living common-law with or without children, or a lone parent living with one or more children (lone-parent family). One-family household refers to a single census family (with or without other persons) that occupies a private dwelling. Multiple-family household refers to a household in which two or more census families (with or without additional persons) occupy the same private dwelling. Family households may also be divided based on the presence of persons not in a census family.

Non-family household refers to either one person living alone in a private dwelling or to a group of two or more people who share a private dwelling, but who do not constitute a census family.

Return to Census data footnote 7 referrer

Footnote 8

Refers to households that consist solely of one census family without additional persons.

Return to Census data footnote 8 referrer

Footnote 9

Refers to households with opposite-sex or same-sex couples.

Return to Census data footnote 9 referrer

Footnote 10

Refers to one-census family households with additional persons and to multiple-census family households, with or without additional persons.

Return to Census data footnote 10 referrer

Footnote 11

Refers to households with opposite-sex or same-sex couples.

Return to Census data footnote 11 referrer

Footnote 12

Structural type of dwelling - Characteristics that define a dwelling's structure, for example, the characteristics of a single-detached house, a semi-detached house, a row house, or an apartment or flat in a duplex. Refers to the structural characteristics and/or dwelling configuration, that is, whether the dwelling is a single-detached house, an apartment in a high-rise building, a row house, a mobile home, etc.

Return to Census data footnote 12 referrer

Footnote 13

Includes mobile homes and other movable dwellings such as houseboats and railroad cars.

Return to Census data footnote 13 referrer

Footnote 14

The category 'Other dwelling' is a subtotal of the following categories: semi-detached house, row house, apartment or flat in a duplex, apartment in a building that has fewer than five storeys and other single-attached house.

Return to Census data footnote 14 referrer

Footnote 15

Household, private - Person or group of persons occupying the same dwelling. Refers to a person or a group of persons (other than foreign residents) who occupy a private dwelling and do not have a usual place of residence elsewhere in Canada.

Household size - Number of persons occupying a private dwelling. Refers to the number of usual residents in a private household.

Return to Census data footnote 15 referrer

Footnote 16

The population excluding institutional residents includes Canadian citizens (by birth or by naturalization) and landed immigrants (permanent residents) excluding those who live in institutions (institutional collective dwellings). Canadian citizens and landed immigrants either: (1) have a usual place of residence in Canada; (2) are abroad either on a military base or attached to a diplomatic mission; or (3) are at sea or in port aboard merchant vessels under Canadian registry or Canadian government vessels. Since 1991, the target population also includes persons with a usual place of residence in Canada who are claiming refugee status, who hold study permits, or who hold work permits, as well as family members living with them; for census purposes, this group is referred to as non-permanent residents. The population universe does not include foreign residents.

Return to Census data footnote 16 referrer

Footnote 17

The languages shown were selected based on the Aboriginal mother tongues most often reported as single responses in Canada in the 2011 Census of Population.

Return to Census data footnote 17 referrer

Footnote 18

The languages shown were selected based on the non-Aboriginal mother tongues (other than English or French) most often reported as single responses in Canada in the 2011 Census of Population.

Return to Census data footnote 18 referrer

Footnote 19

This is a subtotal of all languages collected by the census that are not displayed separately here. For a full list of languages collected in the census, please refer to Appendix D in the 2011 Census Dictionary.

Return to Census data footnote 19 referrer

Footnote 20

English is the first official language spoken by Quebec's official language minority, which consists of all individuals with English as a first official language spoken and half of those with both English and French. French is the first official language spoken by the official language minority in the country overall and in every province and territory outside Quebec, which consists of all individuals with French as a first official language spoken and half of those with both English and French.

Return to Census data footnote 20 referrer

Source: 2011 Census.

How to cite: Statistics Canada. 2013. Central East (Health Region), Ontario and Ontario (table). Health Profile. 2011 Census. Statistics Canada Catalogue no. 82-228-XWE. Ottawa. Released December 12, 2013.
http://www12.statcan.gc.ca/health-sante/82-228/index.cfm?Lang=E (accessed May 15, 2021).

National Household Survey data table

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Health Profile, December 2013, 2011 National Household Survey data
Table summary
The table shows total, male, and female National Household Survey data grouped by geography (appearing as column headers) for selected characteristics (appearing as row headers).
Characteristic Central East
(HR)
Ontario
[Global non-response rate (GNR) = 29.6%] [Global non-response rate (GNR) = 27.1%]
Change geography 1 Change geography 2
Total Male Female Total Male Female
Citizenship
Total population in private households by citizenshipNational Household Survey data footnote 1 1,478,265 718,760 759,505 12,651,795 6,181,445 6,470,345
Canadian citizens 1,373,265 669,270 703,995 11,784,075 5,777,980 6,006,095
Canadian citizens aged under 18 303,070 156,445 146,630 2,563,970 1,318,410 1,245,560
Canadian citizens aged 18 and over 1,070,195 512,825 557,365 9,220,105 4,459,570 4,760,540
Not Canadian citizensNational Household Survey data footnote 2 105,000 49,490 55,505 867,715 403,465 464,250
Immigrant status and period of immigration
Total population in private households by immigrant status and period of immigrationNational Household Survey data footnote 3 1,478,265 718,765 759,500 12,651,795 6,181,445 6,470,350
Non-immigrantsNational Household Survey data footnote 4 973,715 481,245 492,470 8,906,000 4,410,240 4,495,765
ImmigrantsNational Household Survey data footnote 5 490,750 230,680 260,065 3,611,365 1,706,385 1,904,985
Before 1971 84,265 40,200 44,070 723,030 341,820 381,210
1971 to 1980 66,235 30,420 35,820 464,380 217,990 246,390
1981 to 1990 77,005 36,230 40,780 538,285 258,095 280,190
1991 to 2000 128,460 59,985 68,480 866,220 408,270 457,950
2001 to 2011National Household Survey data footnote 6 134,775 63,855 70,915 1,019,460 480,210 539,250
2001 to 2005 73,960 34,940 39,020 518,405 245,850 272,550
2006 to 2011National Household Survey data footnote 6 60,815 28,910 31,900 501,060 234,360 266,695
Non-permanent residentsNational Household Survey data footnote 7 13,805 6,840 6,970 134,425 64,825 69,600
Age at immigration
Total immigrant population in private households by age at immigrationNational Household Survey data footnote 8 490,745 230,680 260,065 3,611,365 1,706,380 1,904,985
Under 5 years 40,855 20,405 20,455 350,090 173,590 176,505
5 to 14 years 83,175 42,330 40,855 640,595 323,135 317,460
15 to 24 years 113,810 50,010 63,795 845,915 378,010 467,905
25 to 44 years 201,020 94,860 106,160 1,447,265 684,940 762,330
45 years and over 51,875 23,075 28,800 327,500 146,710 180,790
Immigrant status and selected places of birth
Total population in private households by immigrant status and selected places of birthNational Household Survey data footnote 9 1,478,265 718,765 759,505 12,651,795 6,181,445 6,470,345
Non-immigrantsNational Household Survey data footnote 10 973,715 481,245 492,470 8,906,000 4,410,235 4,495,765
Born in province of residence 887,810 441,045 446,765 7,916,105 3,934,410 3,981,695
Born outside province of residence 85,905 40,200 45,710 989,900 475,825 514,070
ImmigrantsNational Household Survey data footnote 11 490,745 230,680 260,060 3,611,365 1,706,385 1,904,985
Americas 93,110 39,750 53,360 580,045 256,295 323,750
United States 9,045 3,930 5,110 115,045 49,740 65,305
Jamaica 25,030 9,850 15,185 111,475 46,140 65,330
Guyana 24,575 10,780 13,795 80,070 35,575 44,500
Haiti 885 390 495 9,280 3,800 5,480
Mexico 920 400 525 27,185 12,665 14,515
Trinidad and Tobago 14,150 6,225 7,925 54,680 24,370 30,310
Colombia 1,100 535 570 26,720 12,535 14,190
El Salvador 1,280 650 630 19,650 9,975 9,670
Peru 690 340 355 10,315 4,465 5,855
Chile 655 270 385 8,630 4,140 4,490
Other places of birth in Americas 14,775 6,390 8,385 117,000 52,895 64,100
Europe 104,655 50,495 54,160 1,206,005 576,930 629,075
United KingdomNational Household Survey data footnote 12 40,765 19,030 21,735 291,935 137,350 154,590
Italy 9,720 5,320 4,400 170,710 85,695 85,015
Germany 7,505 3,595 3,905 68,175 31,450 36,720
Poland 6,110 2,795 3,310 101,815 46,325 55,490
Portugal 3,365 1,680 1,685 103,765 50,910 52,855
Netherlands 5,095 2,660 2,430 53,395 26,960 26,435
France 750 330 420 12,935 6,020 6,915
Romania 2,765 1,265 1,505 40,700 19,140 21,555
Russian Federation 1,255 570 685 41,920 18,965 22,955
Greece 7,870 3,975 3,895 39,410 19,940 19,465
Ukraine 1,060 390 670 38,955 17,170 21,790
Croatia 910 475 435 27,940 13,370 14,565
Hungary 1,915 845 1,065 23,510 11,030 12,480
Bosnia and Herzegovina 440 270 165 22,105 11,265 10,835
Serbia 1,075 565 515 23,845 11,385 12,455
Ireland, Republic of 2,460 1,060 1,405 16,995 7,900 9,090
Other places of birth in Europe 11,585 5,670 5,915 127,905 62,045 65,860
Africa 20,100 9,865 10,225 195,905 95,160 100,740
Morocco 335 160 175 5,395 2,535 2,865
Algeria 120 55 60 2,415 1,340 1,075
Egypt 2,385 1,230 1,160 26,200 14,035 12,160
South Africa, Republic of 1,440 790 650 18,405 9,230 9,175
Nigeria 1,750 845 905 17,220 8,740 8,480
Ethiopia 2,005 960 1,045 13,150 6,060 7,095
Kenya 1,725 830 890 14,170 6,400 7,770
Other places of birth in Africa 10,340 4,995 5,350 98,955 46,830 52,120
Asia 271,310 129,810 141,500 1,617,325 772,130 845,200
India 35,345 17,845 17,500 310,410 153,835 156,570
ChinaNational Household Survey data footnote 13 64,070 29,900 34,170 267,780 123,410 144,370
Philippines 43,735 19,080 24,655 204,035 83,860 120,175
Hong Kong Special Administrative Region 19,555 9,020 10,530 105,855 49,885 55,970
Viet NamNational Household Survey data footnote 14 5,880 2,620 3,265 79,645 37,480 42,160
Pakistan 16,295 8,250 8,055 114,595 58,165 56,430
Sri Lanka 46,945 23,055 23,890 110,800 54,755 56,050
IranNational Household Survey data footnote 15 3,570 1,995 1,580 70,305 36,070 34,240
Korea, SouthNational Household Survey data footnote 16 2,960 1,485 1,475 55,485 26,190 29,295
Lebanon 2,530 1,305 1,220 30,135 15,770 14,365
Taiwan 1,595 705 885 17,420 7,765 9,660
Iraq 1,545 835 710 36,355 18,645 17,700
Bangladesh 7,145 3,715 3,435 30,210 15,595 14,615
Afghanistan 5,755 2,905 2,850 26,390 13,325 13,065
Japan 655 220 440 8,015 2,510 5,505
Turkey 1,005 525 485 13,875 7,215 6,660
Other places of birth in Asia 12,720 6,345 6,370 136,030 67,670 68,355
Oceania and otherNational Household Survey data footnote 17 1,575 755 825 12,085 5,860 6,220
Fiji 600 255 340 2,395 1,140 1,255
Other places of birthNational Household Survey data footnote 18 975 500 475 9,685 4,720 4,970
Non-permanent residentsNational Household Survey data footnote 19 13,800 6,840 6,965 134,425 64,825 69,600
Recent immigrants by selected place of birth
Total recent immigrant population in private households by selected places of birthNational Household Survey data footnote 20 60,810 28,910 31,900 501,060 234,365 266,695
Americas 8,130 3,945 4,185 82,225 38,805 43,425
United States 1,655 900 755 20,675 10,260 10,415
Mexico 200 85 120 6,640 3,010 3,625
Cuba 190 90 95 2,620 1,265 1,360
Haiti 440 215 230 3,785 1,505 2,285
Jamaica 1,780 850 925 8,610 4,135 4,480
Brazil 200 80 115 3,885 1,825 2,060
Colombia 345 180 160 10,720 5,115 5,605
Guyana 1,480 705 780 5,615 2,420 3,195
Peru 60 25 35 1,955 790 1,170
VenezuelaNational Household Survey data footnote 21 135 40 95 2,100 1,050 1,050
Other places of birth in Americas 1,650 775 880 15,615 7,430 8,185
Europe 3,025 1,445 1,585 59,945 28,535 31,410
France 70 45 25 1,805 885 915
Germany 225 115 105 2,040 995 1,040
Poland 120 45 80 3,190 1,135 2,050
Romania 260 105 155 4,725 1,990 2,740
MoldovaNational Household Survey data footnote 22 0 0 0 1,415 665 745
Russian Federation 125 35 90 7,885 3,500 4,385
Ukraine 120 65 55 5,635 2,285 3,355
United KingdomNational Household Survey data footnote 12 1,020 475 545 11,145 6,215 4,930
Other places of birth in Europe 1,085 560 530 22,105 10,860 11,245
Africa 3,400 1,535 1,870 40,950 19,620 21,325
Nigeria 565 270 295 7,410 3,665 3,740
Ethiopia 280 135 150 2,475 1,080 1,400
Mauritius 190 70 125 1,520 675 840
Somalia 55 0 45 2,430 1,050 1,380
Algeria 15 0 0 595 270 330
Egypt 390 205 180 6,240 3,215 3,020
Morocco 35 10 25 1,115 520 590
Tunisia 60 30 0 270 130 140
Cameroon 140 70 70 1,210 600 610
Congo, The Democratic Republic of the 270 85 185 1,790 800 985
South Africa, Republic of 170 85 80 1,430 725 710
Other places of birth in Africa 1,230 555 680 14,465 6,895 7,575
Asia 46,090 21,910 24,175 316,080 146,340 169,740
Philippines 8,900 3,870 5,030 53,235 21,660 31,570
ChinaNational Household Survey data footnote 13 13,310 6,125 7,190 53,950 24,195 29,755
India 8,100 4,270 3,835 67,170 32,785 34,385
Pakistan 2,550 1,185 1,360 23,370 11,210 12,160
IranNational Household Survey data footnote 15 420 240 180 16,925 8,060 8,860
South KoreaNational Household Survey data footnote 16 360 195 165 9,950 4,590 5,360
Sri Lanka 6,535 3,075 3,460 16,600 7,815 8,785
Iraq 310 180 130 12,085 5,925 6,155
Bangladesh 1,725 890 835 9,520 4,795 4,725
Lebanon 220 120 100 3,650 1,885 1,760
Viet NamNational Household Survey data footnote 14 220 90 130 4,810 1,825 2,990
Taiwan 220 110 105 2,280 1,045 1,235
Afghanistan 790 395 395 4,885 2,535 2,350
Japan 155 25 130 1,905 500 1,400
Turkey 115 60 60 3,255 1,670 1,580
Israel 30 20 0 2,825 1,400 1,420
Nepal 175 100 70 2,780 1,490 1,295
Hong Kong Special Administrative Region 330 120 210 2,120 860 1,265
United Arab Emirates 200 110 90 3,570 1,785 1,780
Saudi Arabia 220 125 90 2,470 1,330 1,140
SyriaNational Household Survey data footnote 23 125 80 40 2,030 1,050 975
Other places of birth in Asia 1,085 515 575 16,700 7,920 8,775
Oceania and otherNational Household Survey data footnote 17 165 75 85 1,860 1,060 795
Generation status
Total population in private households by generation statusNational Household Survey data footnote 24 1,478,265 718,760 759,500 12,651,795 6,181,445 6,470,350
First generationNational Household Survey data footnote 25 507,355 239,035 268,320 3,779,630 1,788,770 1,990,855
Second generationNational Household Survey data footnote 26 341,175 169,180 171,990 2,849,290 1,420,780 1,428,515
Third generation or moreNational Household Survey data footnote 27 629,730 310,545 319,190 6,022,870 2,971,895 3,050,975
Visible minority population
Total population in private households by visible minority 1,478,265 718,760 759,500 12,651,795 6,181,445 6,470,350
Total visible minority populationNational Household Survey data footnote 28 550,645 263,600 287,050 3,279,565 1,582,480 1,697,085
South AsianNational Household Survey data footnote 29 179,090 89,295 89,795 965,990 484,355 481,635
Chinese 126,090 60,325 65,770 629,140 301,575 327,570
Black 100,645 45,855 54,790 539,205 251,295 287,915
Filipino 58,535 26,215 32,320 275,380 116,825 158,555
Latin American 12,575 5,900 6,675 172,560 83,205 89,360
Arab 9,405 4,915 4,490 151,645 79,620 72,025
Southeast AsianNational Household Survey data footnote 30 10,375 5,100 5,275 137,875 67,645 70,230
West AsianNational Household Survey data footnote 31 12,775 6,590 6,190 122,530 62,515 60,010
Korean 4,065 2,090 1,975 78,290 38,045 40,250
Japanese 2,880 1,250 1,630 29,085 13,345 15,740
Visible minority, n.i.e.National Household Survey data footnote 32 17,780 7,905 9,875 81,130 37,300 43,830
Multiple visible minoritiesNational Household Survey data footnote 33 16,440 8,170 8,270 96,735 46,765 49,970
Not a visible minorityNational Household Survey data footnote 34 927,615 455,165 472,455 9,372,225 4,598,965 4,773,260
Ethnic origin population
Total population in private households by ethnic originsNational Household Survey data footnote 35 1,478,265 718,760 759,500 12,651,795 6,181,445 6,470,345
North American Aboriginal origins 36,385 17,335 19,055 441,395 210,490 230,905
First Nations (North American Indian) 29,155 13,890 15,265 345,870 165,000 180,875
Inuit 700 320 385 6,175 2,815 3,365
Métis 7,085 3,380 3,710 97,045 46,365 50,680
Other North American origins 346,875 171,230 175,645 3,059,480 1,507,105 1,552,380
Acadian 1,555 735 815 15,180 7,350 7,825
American 13,055 6,165 6,890 136,500 64,910 71,595
Canadian 335,870 166,160 169,705 2,946,095 1,453,390 1,492,705
New Brunswicker 45 35 10 265 120 150
Newfoundlander 1,455 630 830 9,590 4,820 4,770
Nova Scotian 230 105 125 1,135 605 525
Ontarian 205 50 150 2,290 1,035 1,255
Québécois 390 195 190 6,115 2,880 3,235
Other North American origins, n.i.e.National Household Survey data footnote 36 160 30 130 1,385 645 745
European origins 825,375 400,655 424,720 8,231,410 4,019,885 4,211,525
British Isles origins 599,315 288,935 310,375 4,989,725 2,423,095 2,566,630
Channel Islander 100 40 65 960 515 450
Cornish 200 90 105 695 355 345
English 364,615 174,560 190,050 2,925,660 1,414,400 1,511,260
Irish 246,140 115,655 130,480 2,069,110 980,610 1,088,495
Manx 265 150 110 1,990 1,050 945
Scottish 241,590 117,445 124,140 2,080,545 1,005,460 1,075,090
Welsh 24,395 11,455 12,940 192,650 91,285 101,365
British Isles origins, n.i.e.National Household Survey data footnote 37 31,145 14,770 16,375 293,170 139,080 154,090
French origins 101,385 47,370 54,015 1,363,370 650,845 712,520
Alsatian 0 0 0 1,045 465 580
Breton 0 0 0 340 155 185
French 101,375 47,360 54,010 1,362,320 650,350 711,970
Western European origins (except French origins) 147,655 71,810 75,840 1,711,125 835,600 875,520
Austrian 6,730 3,565 3,165 68,790 33,745 35,040
Belgian 2,980 1,345 1,630 52,635 25,910 26,720
Dutch 50,075 24,445 25,630 508,595 250,305 258,290
Flemish 240 125 115 4,860 2,430 2,440
Frisian 175 65 110 2,705 1,465 1,245
German 95,060 46,080 48,980 1,154,550 561,145 593,405
Luxembourger 105 45 60 955 480 475
Swiss 3,285 1,510 1,775 57,270 28,440 28,830
Western European origins, n.i.e.National Household Survey data footnote 38 25 15 0 675 300 370
Northern European origins (except British Isles origins) 22,330 11,060 11,265 255,555 123,125 132,435
Danish 5,705 2,940 2,765 53,145 25,695 27,455
Finnish 5,185 2,360 2,825 74,505 35,655 38,850
Icelandic 970 495 470 13,130 6,475 6,650
Norwegian 4,975 2,450 2,525 56,215 27,490 28,725
Swedish 6,030 3,035 2,995 67,795 32,095 35,700
Northern European origins, n.i.e.National Household Survey data footnote 39 860 440 425 8,985 4,350 4,640
Eastern European origins 90,345 44,150 46,195 1,219,960 589,425 630,540
Bulgarian 1,225 575 650 15,500 7,500 8,000
Byelorussian 415 200 215 8,785 3,920 4,860
Czech 3,360 1,600 1,755 39,795 19,100 20,700
Czechoslovakian, n.o.s. 1,035 510 520 14,380 6,765 7,615
Estonian 2,245 1,110 1,135 14,770 6,775 8,000
Hungarian 11,210 5,370 5,840 148,960 72,130 76,830
Latvian 1,425 750 675 16,320 7,825 8,495
Lithuanian 1,660 910 755 29,315 14,635 14,680
Moldovan 25 0 0 2,650 1,310 1,335
Polish 34,595 16,700 17,895 475,565 229,855 245,705
Romanian 4,895 2,510 2,380 85,115 41,445 43,670
Russian 8,360 4,210 4,155 186,940 88,190 98,745
Slovak 2,630 1,365 1,265 38,240 18,855 19,385
Ukrainian 29,325 13,980 15,345 342,005 165,060 176,940
Eastern European origins, n.i.e.National Household Survey data footnote 40 165 90 70 5,975 2,935 3,040
Southern European origins 140,760 70,395 70,370 1,671,705 831,840 839,860
Albanian 1,235 570 665 21,170 10,725 10,445
Bosnian 185 80 100 13,345 6,900 6,445
Croatian 3,210 1,820 1,390 74,020 37,140 36,885
Cypriot 705 290 415 3,920 1,810 2,110
Greek 22,980 11,690 11,295 140,970 72,215 68,755
Italian 59,880 30,750 29,130 883,990 442,710 441,280
Kosovar 85 35 50 1,675 815 865
Macedonian 8,990 4,540 4,450 34,065 17,265 16,800
Maltese 3,865 1,770 2,095 33,455 16,820 16,630
Montenegrin 30 0 20 2,050 1,110 940
Portuguese 22,425 11,030 11,390 295,030 146,645 148,385
Serbian 2,235 1,200 1,035 56,760 28,630 28,125
Sicilian 270 130 145 3,200 1,670 1,530
Slovenian 1,775 920 855 24,585 12,115 12,465
Spanish 20,400 9,460 10,935 164,650 77,185 87,465
Yugoslavian, n.o.s. 2,265 1,055 1,210 25,975 12,530 13,440
Southern European origins, n.i.e.National Household Survey data footnote 41 40 15 25 460 215 240
Other European origins