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Video: Education

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June 26, 2013 – Sarah Jane Ferguson, Analyst, presents a brief portrait of education in Canada, 2011 National Household Survey.

Education

Length: 3:57 minutes

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June 26, 2013
Education Data
2011 National Household Survey

Sarah Jane Ferguson
Analyst
Statistics Canada

The 2011 National Household Survey data on education were released today. These data illustrate findings about the educational characteristics of people in Canada. In this video, I will be giving a quick overview of these data.

In 2011, almost two-thirds of adults aged 25 to 64 had a postsecondary qualification at the trades, college or university level.

An additional 23.2% had a high school diploma as their highest level of educational attainment. 12.7% had no certificate, diploma or degree.

{Visual}: A pie chart demonstrates the proportions for each level of educational attainment.

Among adults aged 25 to 64, Ontario, British Columbia and Yukon were the provinces or territories with the highest proportions of university graduates at the bachelor's degree level and above.

{Visual}: A map of Canada illustrates the proportions of university graduates at the bachelor's degree level and above in Ontario (28.9%), British Columbia (27.3%) and Yukon (25.8%).

Among the three postsecondary credentials, only trades certificates were held by a lower proportion of younger adults than older adults.

10.7% of young adults aged 25 to 34 had a trades certificate compared with 12.8% among adults aged 55 to 64.

{Visual}: A bar graph illustrates the proportion of young adults aged 25 to 34 with a trades certificate (10.7%) compared with older adults, aged 55 to 64 (12.8%).

On the other hand, a higher proportion of younger adults had a university degree compared with older adults.

{Visual}: A bar graph illustrates the proportion of young adults aged 25 to 34 with a university degree (31.9%) compared with older adults, aged 55 to 64 (20.2%).

Women accounted for 59.1% of young adults aged 25 to 34 with a university degree.

This was higher than the 47.3% share they represented among older university degree holders aged 55 to 64.

{Visual}: A pie chart illustrates the proportion of women among university degree holders aged 25 to 34 (59.1%) compared with men (40.9%) in this age group. Another pie chart illustrates the proportion of women among university degree holders aged 55 to 64 (47.3%) compared with men (52.7%) in this age group.

At the trades level, about 8 in 10 Registered Apprenticeship certificates – including electricians and plumbers – were held by men in either age group.

{Visual}: A pie chart illustrates the proportion of men among those aged 25 to 34 with a Registered Apprenticeship certificate (79.9%) compared with women (21.1%) in this age group. Another pie chart illustrates the proportion of men among those aged 55 to 64 with Registered Apprenticeship certificate (80.1%) compared with women (19.9%) in this age group.

The term STEM stands for a grouping of the following fields of study: 'science and technology', 'engineering and engineering technology' and 'mathematics and computer sciences'.

Immigrant adults aged 25 to 64 represented just under one-quarter of Canada's total adult population but over one-third of adults with a university degree.

Half of STEM university degrees were held by immigrants, including those who have lived in Canada for many years, as well as newcomers.

{Visual}: A bar graph demonstrates the share of university STEM degree holders by immigrant status of people aged 25 to 64. It represents the proportion of immigrant adults of Canada's total population at 24.6%, with non-immigrant adults at 75.4%. It also shows the proportion of immigrants among adults in this age group with a university degree as 34.3%, with non-immigrant adults at 65.7%. The final bar represents the proportion of STEM degree holders who are immigrant adults, which is 50.9% compared with 49.1% who are non-immigrants.

Among Aboriginal people aged 25 to 64, almost one-half had a postsecondary qualification in 2011.

In comparison, almost two-thirds of non-Aboriginal people in the same age group had a postsecondary qualification.

{Visual}: A bar graph illustrates the proportion of Aboriginal people aged 25 to 64 who had a postsecondary qualification, which is 48.4%. The proportion of non-Aboriginal people who had a postsecondary qualification is shown as 64.7%.

More than 4 in 10 First Nations people aged 25 to 64 had a postsecondary qualification.

The proportion of First Nations people with a postsecondary qualification was higher among those without registered Indian status than among those with registered Indian status.

{Visual}: A bar graph illustrates the proportions of First Nations people aged 25 to 64 who had a postsecondary qualification, as well as those with and without registered Indian status. The proportions are shown as 44.8% for all First Nations people, 52.1% for those without registered Indian status, and 42.3% for those with registered Indian status.

Over half of Métis aged 25 to 64 had a postsecondary qualification.

{Visual}: A pie chart illustrates the proportion of Métis aged 25 to 64 who had a postsecondary qualification as 54.8%, with 45.2% having no postsecondary qualification.

More than one-third of Inuit aged 25 to 64 had a postsecondary qualification.

{Visual}: A pie chart illustrates the proportion of Inuit aged 25 to 64 who had a postsecondary qualification as 35.6%, with 64.4% having no postsecondary qualification.

Thank you for watching this quick overview. Visit the Statistics Canada website for a more in-depth look at these data and for more information on your municipality, province or territory.

If you have any questions, sign up for our live chat session on June 28, from 12:30 to 1:30 p.m., Eastern Daylight Time. Visit the website and select this icon to register.

{Visual}: Statistics Canada's website appears, showing the icon for the "Chat with an expert" module.

{Visual}: The image fades into the Canada wordmark against a black background.

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