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Video: Housing

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September 11, 2013 – Jerry Situ, Senior analyst, presents a brief overview of housing in Canada, 2011 National Household Survey.

Housing

Length: 3:57 minutes

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September 11, 2013
Housing data
2011 National Household Survey

Jerry Situ
Senior Analyst
Statistics Canada

The 2011 National Household Survey data on housing were released today. These data illustrate findings about the characteristics, costs, and affordability of homes in Canada. In this video, I will give a quick overview of these data.

In 2011, almost seven out of ten Canadian households owned their homes.

This rate is similar to that of the 2006 Census, and it follows 15 years of increase between 1991 and 2006.

{Visual}: A line chart shows the homeownership rate from 1971 to 2011. It is a steady increase to 69% in 2011, except between the years of 1991 and 2006 when the rate of increase is higher.

The Atlantic Provinces had the highest homeownership rates in Canada.

{Visual}: A map of Canada shows the homeownership rates in Newfoundland and Labrador, New Brunswick, and Prince Edward Island, and Nova Scotia, as 77.5%, 75.7%, 73.4%, and 70.8% respectively.

The lowest rate among the provinces was in Quebec.

{Visual}: A map of Canada shows the homeownership rate in Quebec as 61.2%.

In the territories, the rate was below the national average. Only Nunavut had fewer households who owned versus rented their home.

{Visual}: A map of Canada shows the homeownership rate in Nunavut as 21%.

One in eight households lived in condominium dwellings.

Just over three-quarters were located in ten Census Metropolitan Areas, also called CMAs.

{Visual}: The ten Census Metropolitan Areas (CMAs) with the most condominiums are listed. They are: Toronto, Vancouver, Montréal, Calgary, Edmonton, Ottawa - Gatineau, Québec, Hamilton, Victoria and London. A pie chart indicates that 76.8% of condominiums were located in one of these CMAs. The remaining 23.2% are located outside of these CMAs.

In these ten CMAs, one in three homes built between 2001 and 2011 were condominium units. This proportion was smaller among older homes.

{Visual}: A bar graph shows that 34.3% of homes built between 2001 and 2011 were condominium units. It also gives the proportion of condominiums built during earlier periods of construction: 27.1% from 1991 to 2000; 21.2% from 1981 to 1990; and 9.4% from 1980 or before.

The higher proportion of condominium units among recently built homes was balanced by a smaller proportion of non-condominium rental units. One in ten homes built between 2001 and 2011 were rented, while the rate was higher among older homes.

{Visual}: A bar graph shows that 10.6% of homes built between 2001 and 2011 were non-condominium rental units. It also gives the proportion of non-condominium rental units built during earlier periods of construction: 17.0% from 1991 to 2000; 27.1% from 1981 to 1990; and 41.2% from 1980 or before.

Owners living in condominiums were different than other homeowners. In condominiums, just under half were non-family households, which are one person households or a group of roommates. While in homes that were not condominiums, less than one in five were non-family households.

{Visual}: A stacked bar graph shows that 45.5% homeowners living in condominiums were in non-family households. Of other homeowners, 15.6% were in non-family households.

Owners in condominiums were also more likely to be in younger households or senior households.

About 20% of condominium owners were under 35 years old, while only 10% of owners not in condominiums were under 35 years old. For seniors aged 65 and over, they represented one-quarter of condominium owners; while only one-fifth of owners not in condominiums were seniors.

{Visual}: A stacked bar graph shows that 19.8% of condominium owners were under 35 years old, while 26.1% of them were aged 65 and over. Of other homeowners, 10.5% were under 35 years old, while 20.7% were aged 65 and over.

Housing agencies, such as the Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation, measure housing affordability against a threshold based on whether the household spends 30% or more of its total income on shelter costs.

{Visual}: A horizontal bar gives a visual proportion of the 30% affordability threshold.

Shelter costs include, where applicable, utilities, mortgage payments, property taxes, condominium fees, and monthly rent.

In 2011, the average monthly shelter cost paid by all households in Canada was $1,050. For owners, it was about $1,150; and for renters, about $850.

{Visual}: A bar graph shows the average monthly shelter cost paid by all households in Canada as $1,050, the cost paid by owners as $1,141, and the cost for renters as $848.

Approximately one-quarter of households exceeded the affordability threshold. For owners, less than one fifth was above the limit; while for renters, two fifths were above the limit.

{Visual}: A bar graph shows that 25.2% of households exceeded the affordability threshold. For owners, 18.5% was above the limit. For renters 40.1% was above the limit.

Thank you for watching this quick overview. Visit the Statistics Canada website for a more in-depth look at these data and for more information on your municipality, province or territory.

If you have any questions, sign up for our live chat session on Friday, September 13, 2013, from 12:30 to 1:30 p.m., Eastern Daylight Time. Visit the website and select this icon to register.

{Visual}: Statistics Canada's website appears, showing the icon for the "Chat with an expert" module.

{Visual}: The image fades into the Canada wordmark against a black background. The video fades to black.

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