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Video: Labour

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June 26, 2013 – Vincent Ferrao, Analyst, presents a brief overview of labour in Canada, 2011 National Household Survey.

Labour

Length: 3:32 minutes

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June 26, 2013
Labour Data
2011 National Household Survey

Vincent Ferrao
Analyst
Statistics Canada

The 2011 National Household Survey data on labour were released today. These data illustrate findings about the Canadian working population, including industry, occupation and interprovincial mobility.

In this video, I will be giving a quick overview of these data.

During the week of Sunday, May 1st to Saturday, May 7th, 2011, Canada had close to 18 million labour force participants 15 years of age and over. Of this number, 16.6 million had a job. The employment rate was 60.9%.

{Visual}: A pie chart illustrates the employment rate in Canada, showing the proportion of those with job statuses other than 'employed' as 39.1% in 2011.

Yukon and Alberta had the highest employment rates in Canada.

{Visual}: A map of Canada shows the employment rate in the Yukon and Alberta as 69.7% and 69%, respectively.

The lowest employment rates were in Newfoundland and Labrador and Nunavut.

{Visual}: A map of Canada shows the employment rate in Nunavut and Newfoundland and Labrador as 52.1% and 50.7%, respectively.

Workers 55 years and older made up 18.7% of the entire employed population. In the 2006 Census they accounted for 15.5%.

{Visual}: A bar graph shows the proportion of workers 55 years and older among the total working population in 2011 (18.7%) and 2006 (15.5%).

Just over 3 million people aged 55 years and older had a job. The employment rate of this age group was 34.9%, compared with 32.2% in the 2006 Census.

{Visual}: A bar graph shows the proportion of people 55 years and older who have a job in 2011 (34.9%) and 2006 (32.2%).

The three industrial sectors with the highest shares of employment in 2011 were retail trade, health care and social services, and manufacturing.

Retail trade employed 11.5% of workers; health care and social services, 11.4%; and manufacturing, 9.2%.

{Visual}: A horizontal bar graph shows the shares of employment in the retail trade (11.5%), health care and social services (11.4%), and manufacturing (9.2%) sectors.

The most common occupation for women was retail salesperson, followed by administrative assistant, registered nurse and registered psychiatric nurse, cashier, and preschool and elementary teacher.

{Visual}: A bar graph shows the shares of the most common occupations for women: retail salesperson (4.7%), administrative assistant (4.0%), registered nurse and registered psychiatric nurse (3.4%), cashier (3.3%), and preschool and elementary teacher (2.9%).

The most common occupation for men was retail salesperson, followed by truck driver, retail manager, carpenter, and caretaker and building superintendant.

{Visual}: A bar graph shows the shares of the most common occupations for men: retail salesperson (3.3%), truck driver (2.9%), retail manager (2.5%), carpenter (1.7%), and caretaker and building superintendant (1.7%).

The Northwest Territories had the highest proportion of employed people in 2011 who were living in another province or territory five years earlier.

{Visual}: A map of Canada shows the proportion of employed people in the Northwest Territories who were living in another province or territory five years earlier as 19.2%.

Of the provinces, Alberta and Prince Edward Island had the highest proportions of employed people who were living in another province or territory five years earlier.

{Visual}: A map of Canada shows the proportion of employed people in Alberta (7.6%) and Prince Edward Island (7.3%) who were living in another province or territory five years earlier

In 2011, roughly four in five workers went to work by car, truck or van.

Twelve percent of workers used public transport, compared with 11% in the 2006 Census.

{Visual}: A bar graph shows the proportion of people who went to work by car, truck or van as 79.6%, and the proportion of those who went to work using public transport as 12%.

The average commute time for Canadian workers was 25.4 minutes.

The longest commute times were observed in the metropolitan areas of Toronto, Oshawa and Montréal.

{Visual}: A map of Canada shows the average commute times in Toronto (32.8 minutes), Oshawa (31.8 minutes) and Montréal (29.7 minutes).

Thank you for watching this quick overview. A document on the use of languages in the workplace was also published by Statistics Canada today. Visit the website for a more in-depth look at these data and for more information on your municipality, province or territory.

If you have any questions, sign up for our live chat session on June 28, from 12:30 to 1:30 p.m., Eastern Daylight Time. Visit the website and select this icon to register.

{Visual}: Statistics Canada's website appears, showing the icon for the "Chat with an expert" module.

{Visual}: The image fades into the Canada wordmark against a black background.

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